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Cl  £di&oru  peh* 


A  SELECTIVE  MICROFILM  EDITION 


PART  IV 
(1899-1910) 


Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Gregory  Jankunis 
David  W.  Hutchings 
Leslie  Fields 


Theresa  M.  Collins 
Gregory  Field 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 
Karen  A.  Detig 
Lorie  Stock 


Robert  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 


Sponsors 

Rutgers,  The  State  University  Of  New  Jersey 
National  Park  Service,  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Smithsonian  Institution 


University  Publications  of  America 
Bethesda,  MD 
1999 


Edison  signntur 


1  with  permission  of  McGraw-Edison  Company 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers 
at 

Rutgers,  The  State  University 
endorsed  by 

National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission 
18  June  1981 

Copyright  ©  1999  by  Rutgers,  The  State  University  •  •  • 

All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  including  any  portion  of  the  guide  and  index  or  of 
the  microfilm  may  be  reproduced,  stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted  hi  any  form  by  any 
means — graphic,  electronic,  mechanical,  or  chemical,  includingpliotocopying,  reeordingor  taphig, 
or  information  storage  and  retrieval  systems—' without  written  permission  of  Rutgers,  The  State 
University,  New  Brunswick,  New  Jersey. 

The  original  documents  hi  this  edition  are  from  the  archives  at  the  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
at  West  Orange,  New  Jersey. 


ISBN  0-89093-703-6 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  PAPERS 


Robert  A.  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 

Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Associate  Director  and  Coeditor 

Paul  B.  Israel 

Managing  Editor,  Book  Edition 
Helen  Endick 

Assistant  Director  for  Administration 


Associate  Editors 
Theresa  M.  Collins 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Keith  A.  Nier 

Research  Associates 

Gregory  Jankunis 
Lorie  Stock 


Assistant  Editors 
Louis  Carlat 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 


Secretary 
Grace  Kurkowski 


Student  Assistants 

Amy  Cohen  Jessica  Rosenberg 

Bethany  Jankunis  Stacey  Saelg 

Laura  Konrad  Wojtek  Szymkowiak 

Vishal  Nayak  Matthew  Wosniak 


BOARD  OF  SPONSORS 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New 
Jersey 

Francis  L.  Lawrence 
Joseph  J.  Seneca 
Richard  F.  Foley 
David  M.  Oshhisky 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Howard  L.  Green 


National  Park  Service 
John  Maounis 
Maryanne  Gerbauckas 
Roger  Durham 
George  Tselos 
Smithsonian  Institution 
Bernard  Finn 
Arthur  P.  Molelia 


EDITORIAL  ADVISORY  BOARD 

James  Brittain,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology 
R.  Frank  Colson,  University  of  Southampton 
Louis  Galambos,  Johns  Hopkins  University 
Susan  Hockey,  University  of  Alberta 
Thomas  Parke  Hughes,  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Peter  Robinson,  Oxford  University 

Philip  Scranton,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology/Hagley  Museum  and  Library 
Merritt  Roe  Smith,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 


FINANCIAL  CONTRIBUTORS 


PRIVATE  FOUNDATIONS 
The  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundation 
Charles  Edison  Fund 
The  Hyde  and  Watson  Foundation 
National  Trust  for  the  Humanities 
Geraldine  R.  Dodge  Foundation 


PUBLIC  FOUNDATIONS 
National  Science  Foundation 
National  Endowment  for  the 
Humanities 

National  Historical  Publications  and 
Records  Commission 


PRIVATE  CORPORATIONS  AND  INDIVIDUALS 


Alabama  Power  Company 

Anonymous 

AT&T 

Atlantic  Electric 

Association  of  Edison  Illuminating 
Companies 

Battelle  Memorial  Institute 
The  Boston  Edison  Foundation 
Cabot  Corporation  Foundation,  Inc. 
Carolina  Power  &  Light  Company 
Consolidated  Edison  Company  of  New 
York,  Inc. 

Consumers  Power  Company 
Cooper  Industries 
Corning  Incorporated 
Duke  Power  Company 
Entergy  Corporation  (Middle  South 
Electric  System) 

Exxon  Corporation 

Florida  Power  &  Light  Company 

General  Electric  Foundation 

Gould  Inc.  Foundation 

Gulf  States  Utilities  Company 

David  and  Nina  Heitz 

Hess  Foundation,  Inc. 

Idaho  Power  Company 


IMO  Industries 

International  Brotherhood  of  Electrical 
Workers 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  H.  Katz 
Matsushita  Electric  Industrial  Co.,  Ltd. 
Midwest  Resources,  Inc. 

Minnesota  Power 
New  Jersey  Bell 
New  York  State  Electric  &  Gas 
Corporation 

North  American  Philips  Corporation 
Philadelphia  Electric  Company 
Philips  Lighting  B.V. 

Public  Service  Electric  and  Gas  Company 

RCA  Corporation 

Robert  Bosch  GmbH 

Rochester  Gas  and  Electric  Corporation 

San  Diego  Gas  and  Electric 

Savannah  Electric  and  Power  Company 

Schering-Plough  Foundation 

Texas  Utilities  Company 

Thomas  &  Betts  Corporation 

Thomson  Grand  Public 

Transamerica  Delaval  Inc. 

Westinghouse  Foundation 
Wisconsin  Public  Service  Corporation 


219 


A  Note  on  the  Sources 

The  pages  which  have  been 
filmed  are  the  best  copies 
available.  Every  technical 
effort  possible  has  been 
made  to  ensure  legibility. 


PUBLICATION  AND  MICROFILM 
COPYING  RESTRICTIONS 


Reel  duplication  of  the  whole  or  of 
any  part  of  this  film  is  prohibited. 
In  lieu  of  transcripts,  however, 
enlarged  photocopies  of  selected 
items  contained  on  these  reels 
may  be  made  in  order  to  facilitate 
research. 


NEW  JERSEY  PATENT  COMPANY  RECORDS 


The  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  was  incorporated  in  the  State  of  New 
Jersey  on  April  25,  1903.  It  was  concerned  primarily  with  obtaining  and 
holding  phonograph-related  patents  granted  to  Edison  and  other 
experimenters.  It  also  held  some  securities  of  Edison  and  non-Edison 
companies.  In  1906  Edison  succeeded  one  of  the  incorporators,  Louis  M. 
Sanders,  as  president.  In  1911  the  company's  property  rights  were 
transferred  to  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Inc.,  in  exchange  for  stock  in  that 
corporation.  The  company  was  officially  dissolved  in  1931.  The  records 
cover  the  years  1 903-1 911,  with  a  small  amount  of  additional  material  from 
1917,  1925,  and  1926.  They  consist  of  minutes,  a  letterbook,  a  general 
ledger,  and  a  journal.  Unbound  correspondence  regarding  the  activities  of  the 
company  can  be  found  in  the  "New  Jersey  Patent  Company"  folders  in  the 
Document  File  Series. 

The  records  are  arranged  in  the  following  order:  (1)  minutes 
(1903-1906);  (2)  letterbook  (1908-1910);  (3)  ledger  (1903-1926);  and  (4) 
journal  (1903-1926). 


Minutes  (1903-1906) 

This  folder  consists  of  unbound  minutes  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  Included  are 
minutes  of  the  organizational  meeting  of  May  14, 1903;  copies  of  the  certificate  of  incorporation 
and  bylaws;  and  directors'  and  stockholders'  minutes  through  February  5, 1906. 

Letterbook  (1908-1910) 

This  letterbook  covers  the  period  February  1 908-June  1 91 0.  It  contains  four  letters  signed 
by  Edison  as  president  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  and  two  letters  by  Harry  F.  Miller,  secretary 
and  treasurer.  One  of  Edison's  letters  agrees  to  pay  Jonas  W.  Aylsworth  $20,000  and  Walter  H. 
Miller  $10,000  for  making  a  commercially  viable  eight-minute  record. 

Ledger  (1903-1926) 

This  ledger  covers  the  period  May  1903  to  February  1911,  with  additional  entries  from 
1917, 1925,  and  1926.  As  the  account  book  of  final  entry,  it  summarizes  transactions  pertaining 
to  the  business  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  Separate  accounts  detail  cash,  general  expense, 
experimental,  and  patent  transactions.  Included  are  accounts  with  Edison,  patent  attorneys,  and 
other  individuals  and  companies.  Edison's  account  covers  the  period  June  1 903-December  1910, 
with  two  additional  entries  from  1917.  The  entry  for  February  27,  1909,  includes  a  $5,000,000 
credit  to  Edison,  indicated  as  "By  Sundries." 

Journal  (1903-1926) 

This  journal  covers  the  period  May  1 903-February  1911,  with  additional  entries  from  May 
1917,  December  1925,  and  February  1926.  Chronological  entries  provide  information  about 
transactions  posted  to  various  accounts  and  recorded  in  the  corporate  ledger.  The  journal  is  a 
partial  record  and  does  not  provide  information  about  all  of  the  posted  transactions.  The  entries 
from  February  1911  detail  the  sale  of  the  company's  property  rights  to  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Inc., 
for  $200,000  in  stock.  The  entries  from  1 917  are  in  the  form  of  directors'  minutes  and  indicate  the 
sale  of  the  company's  stock  in  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Inc.,  and  the  purchase  of  outstanding  New 
Jersey  Patent  Co.  stock  from  Edison  and  his  wife,  Mina  Miller  Edison. 


New  Jersey  Patent  Company  Records 
Minutes  (1903-1906) 

This  folder  consists  of  unbound  minutes  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co. 
Included  are  minutes  of  the  organizational  meeting  of  May  14, 1903;  copies  of 
the  certificate  of  incorporation  and  bylaws;  and  directors'  and  stockholders' 
minutes  through  February  5, 1906. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


1  Pirst  meeting  of  the  incorporators  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent 


2  Company  held  at  the  office  of  Howard  W.  Hayes,  No.  763 

Broad  Street 

3  in  the  City  of  Newark,  on  this  fourteenth  day  of  May,  1903 

at  ten 

4  o'clock  in  the  forenoon. 


5  Present 

6  William  Pelzer 

7,  Prederick  C.  Pisoher 

8  Louis  M.  Sande  ra 


9  The  meeting  was  oalled  to  order  and  Louis  M.  Sanders 

10  was  elected  chairman  of  the  meeting  and  Perderick  C.  Pis- 

oher 

11  secretary. 


12  A  waiver  of  notice  of  first  meeting  signed  by  all  the 

13  incorporators  was  presented  and  read  at  the  meeting  and  on 

14  motion  was  ordered  to  be  spread  upon  the  minutes. 


15  Waiver  of  notice  iB  as  follows:- 


16  WAIVER  OP  NOTICE  OP  MEETING  OP  INCORPORATORS. 


17  We  the  undersigned  being  all  the  incorporators  of  The  "Nw 

"New  Jersey 

18  Patent  Company",  hereby  waive  notice  of  the  time, place  and 

purpose 

19  of  the  first  meeting  of  the  incorporators  of  said  Company, 

■  and 

20  do  fix  the  fourteenth  day  of  May, 1903,  at  ten  o'clock  in 

the 

21  forenoon  as  the  time  and  the  principal  office  of  the  said 

Company 

22  as  the  place  of  said  meeting.  And  we  hereby  waive  all  the 

23  rquirements  of  the  statutes  of  New/  Jersey  as  to  notice  of 

said 

24  meeting  and  the  publication  thereof  and  consent  to  the 

transaction 

25  of  such  business  as  may  come  before  the  meeting. 

26  Dated  May  14 ,  1903  William  Pelzer 

27  Prederick  C.  Pischer 

28  Louis  M.  Sanders 


1  A  duly  certified  copy  of  the  certificate  of  organiza¬ 

tion  YfU3 

2  then  presented  to  the  meeting  and  read  and  on  motion  was 

3  ordered  to  ho  spread  at  length  upon  the  minutes. 

4  The  certificate  of  organization  is  as  follows:- 

5  This,  is  to  oertify  that  We,  William  Pelzer,  Frederick  C. 

6  Fisoher  and  Louis  If.  Banders,  do  hereby  associate  ourselves 

into  a 

7  corporation,  by  virtue  of  the  provisions  of  an  act  of  the 

Legislature  of 

8  New  Jersey  entitled  "An  Act  Concerning  Corporations" 

(revision  of  1896) 

9  approved  April  21st,  1896,  and  the  several  supplements 

thereto  for  the 

10  purposes  hereinafter  mentioned,  and  to  that  end  we  do  by 

this  our 

11  certificate  set  forth 


12  FI  rot  :  The  name  of  the  corporation  is: 

13  "NEW  JERSEY  PATENT  COMPANY" 


14  Second:  The  location  of  the  principal  office  in  this 

State  is  at 

15  the  comer  of  Valley  Road  and  Lakeside  Avenue  in  the  Town¬ 

ship  of 

16  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex. 

17  The  name  of  the  agent  therein  and  in  charge  thereof 

18  upon  process  against  the  corporation  may  be  served  is  John 

19  F.  Randolph. 


20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 


Third:  The  objects  for  which  this  corporation  is  formed 

are  to 

apply  for,  obtain,  register,  purchase  or  otherwise  acquire, 
and  to  feh&d,  own, 

use,  operate,  Bell,  assign,  or  otherwise  dispose  of  any  and 
all  in¬ 
vent  ionB,  improvements  and  processes  and  letters  patent 
therefor  and 

any  and  all  formulae,  secret  processes,  trade  marks,  trade 
names 

and  distinctive  marks  in  the  United  States  and  other 
Countries,  and 

to  ubb,  exercise,  grant  licenses  in  respect  of  or  otherwise 
turn  to 

account  any  and  all  such  inventions,  improvements,  process¬ 
es.  letters 


patent,  formulae,  secret  peoesses,  trade  marks,  trade 


names, 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 

26 


and  distinctive  marks,  and  to  do  any  and  all  things  nec¬ 
essary 

or  useful  for  the  purpose  of  oarrying  out  the  foregoing  ob- 
j  ects  in  any 

part  of  thw  world  as  principal,  agent,  trustee,  or  other¬ 
wise. 

fourth:  The  total  arrount  of  the  capital  stock  is 

Ten  Thousand  Dollars  ($10,000.) 

the  number  of  shares  into  which  the  same  is  divided  is  one 
hundred 

(100)  and  the  pair  value  of  each  share  is  one  hundred  dol¬ 
lars  ($100.) 

The  amount  with  which  said  corporation  will  commence 

business  is  One  Thousand  Dollars  ($1,000.)  which  is  divid¬ 
ed  into  ten 

(10)  shares  of  the  par  vakue  of  One  hundred  dollars  ($100.) 
eaoh. 

Eifth:  The  names  and  residences  of  the  incorporators  and 

the 

number  of  shares  subscribed  for  by  each,  are  as  follows 
NAMES  P.  0.  ADDRESS  NO.  OE  SHARES 

William  Pelzer  New  York,  N.Y.  four  shares 

Erederick  C.  Eischer  Newark,  N.  J.  three  shares 

Louis  M.  Sanders  Washington,  D.C.  three  shares 

IN  WITNESS  WHEREOE,  We  have  hereunto  set  our  hands  and 
seals 

the  twenty-third  day  of  April,  One  thousand  nine  hundred 
and  three. 

Signed,  Sealed  and  Delivered  ) 

in  the  presence  of  )  William  Pelzer  (LS.) 

Howard  W.  Hayes  Ered'k  C.  Eischer  (LS.) 

Louis  M,  Sanders  (LS.) 

State  of  New  Jersey  ) 

)  ss. 

County  of  Essex  )  Be  it  remembered  that  on  this 

twenty -third 

day  of  April  in  the  year  of  Our  Lord  One  j 

thousand  nine  hundred  and  three,  before  me'the  subscriber, 
a  Master  in 


1  Chancery  of  New  Jersey,  personally  appeared  William  Pelzer 

2  Frederick  C.  Fischer  and  Louis  H.  Sandersm  who,  I  am  satis¬ 

fied 

3  are  the  persons  named  in  and  who  executed  the  foregoing 

4  Certificate  of  Incorporation,  and  I  hairing  first  made 

known  to 

5  them  the  contents  thereof,  they  severally  acknowledged  that 

they 

6  signed,  sealed  and  (faeiixaxral  executed  the  same  as  their 

voluntary  act  and 

7  deed,  for  the  uses  and  purposes  therein  expressed, 

8  Howard  W.  Hayes, 

9  Master  in  Chancery 

10  of  New  Jersey. 

11  Endorsed: 

12  "Received  and  recorded  in  the  office  of  the  Clerk 

of  the 

13  County  of  Essex  this  24th  day  of  April  1903. 

14  Book  27  of  Incor.  Bus.  Co.  page  33. 

15  Arthur  Ho rt  on, 

16  Clerk" 


17  "Filed  Apr.  25,  1903. 

18  S.  D.  Dickinson, 


19  Secretary  of  State." 

20  The  following  By-Laws  were  then  presented  to  the  meeting 

and 

21  read  and  discussed  section  by  section  and  adopted  unani¬ 

mously.  On 

22  motion  they  were  ordered  to  be  spread  at  length  upon  the 

minut  es . 

23  BY-LAWS 


24 

25 

Dlg'set  o  rs  26 

27 

28 


"NEW  JERSEY  PATENT  COMPANY" 


The  number  of  directors  shall  be  three  of  whom  two 

shall  be  a  quorum.  They  shall  be  ejected  by  the  stock¬ 
holders  ; 

at  their  regular  annual  meeting  and  shall  hold  office 
one  year 


1  and  until  their  suoceBBors  shall  he  elected. 

2  -2- 

3  The  officers  of  the  Company  shall  he  a  President,  a  Vioe 

4  President,  a  Secretary  and  Treasurer,  who  shall  he  eleoted 

hy 

5  the  Board  of  Directors  and  shall  hold  their  respective 

offices  for  one 

6  year  and  Until  their  successors  shall  he  elected. 

■B  -3- 

8  The  Board  of  Directors  shall  appoint  such  other  minor 

9  offioera  and  agents  as  they  shall  deem  advisable  and  may 

/  delegate 

10  the  power  to  the  General  Manager. 

11  -4- 

12  The  Board  of  Directors  shall  fix  the  salaries  of  the 

officers 

13  and  agents  of  the  Company. 

14  *  -5- 

15  Vacancies  among  the  officers  or  directors  shall  he  filled 

16  hy  the  Board  of  Directors. 

17  -6- 

18  Tho  Board  of  Directors  shall  regularly  meet  on  the 

19  first  Monday  of  the  month  of  May,  August,  November  and 

Pebruary  in  each  year 

20  Special  Meet ings  shall  he  called  hy  the  President  at  the 

21  request  of  two  directors  and  ten  days  notice  shall  he  given 

of  the  same 

22  The  meetings  within  this  state  shall  he  held  at  West  Orange 

23  At  the  meetings  the  order  of  business  shall  he: 

24  1.  Roll  Call 

25  2.  Reading  of  Minutes 

26  3.  Report  of  Standing  Committee.;? 

27  4.  Report  of  Special  Committees 

28  5.  Unfinished  business 

29  6.  New  Business 


2 

Stockhold-  3 
ers 

Meetings  4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

Treasur-  11 
er' s 

Bond  12 

13 

14 

Stock  15 

Certifi¬ 
cate  10 

17 

18 
19 

Dividends  20 
21 

22 

Seal  23 

24 

25 

By-Laws  26 

27 

28 


7.  Adjournment. 

-7- 

An  annual  meeting  of  stockholders  fior  the  election  of 
Directors  shall  ho  held  at  West  Orange,  N.J.,  on  the  first 
Monday  of  May  in  each  year  at  twelve  o'clock  noon 
and  the  polls  shall  remain  open  one  hour. 

Notice  of  such  meeting  shall  be  given  by  the  secretary 

by  mailing  a  notice  to  each  stockholder  at  least  five  days 
before 

each  meeting. 

-8- 

The  T rat| surer  shall  give  a  bond  to  the  Company  in  such 

sum  and  with  such  Bifficient  sureties  as  shall  be  approved 
by 

the  Board  of  Directors. 

-9- 

Stock  of  the  Company  shall  be  transferred  only  on  the 
stock  Certificate  Book  of  the  Company  and  shall  be  signed 
by  the  President  and  Treasurer  and  the  corporate  seal  shall 
be  affixed  thereto. 

-10- 

Dividends  of  the  net  profits  of  the  Company  may  be 

deolared  from  time  to  time  by  the  Directors  in  their  dis¬ 
cretion. 

-11- 

The  seal  of  the  Company  shall  bear  the  corporate  name  of 

the  Company  with  a  suitable  device  and  the  words  "Incorpor¬ 
ated  1903“ 

-12- 

The  By-Laws  may  be  altered  or  amended  by  a 
two-thirds  vote  of  thoso  present  at  any  regular  or  special 
meeting  of  the  Board  of  Directors, 


1  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to  the  elec¬ 

tion 

2  ofl  directors  of  the  Corporation  to  serve  for  the  ensuing 

year 

3  and  until  their  successors  are  elected. 

4  Motion  carried  unanimously. 


5  The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  directors 

and 

6  the  following  persons  were  unanimously  elected. 

7  William  Pelzer 

8  Frederick  C.  Fischer 

9  Louis  M.  Sanders 


10  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  directors  he  authorized 

11  to  levy  an  assessment  of  100  per  cent  on  the  capital  stock 

12  already  sub scribed  for. 

13  Motion  carried  unanimously. 


14  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  directors  of  the  corporation 

15  have  power  from  time  to  time  to  issue  the  stock  of  the  Com¬ 

pany 

16  up  to  the  amount  authorized  by  the  certificate  of  organiza¬ 

tion 

17  in  their  discretion,  either  for  cash  or  for  property  pur¬ 

chased, 

18  and  to  purchase  such  patents,  patent  rights,  trade  mark  sip 

19  trade  names,  seoret  processes,  formulae  and  inventions 

either 

20  for  cash  or  by  the  issue  of  such  stock  aB  they  may  deem 

21  advisable. 

22  Motion  carried  unanimously. 

23  On  motion  the  meeting  then  adjourned. 

24  Frederick  C.  Fischer, 

25  Secretary. 


1  First  meeting  of  the  directors  of  the  "New  Jersey  Patent 

Company" 

2  held  this  eighteenth  day  of  May,  1903,  at  ten  o'clock  in 

the  forenoon 

3  in  the  office  of  Howard  W.  Hayes,  765  Broad  Street,  Newark 

N.  J. 

4  pursuant  to  notioe, 


5  Present 

6  William  Pelzer 

7  Frederick  C.  Fisoher 

8  louis  M.  Sanders 


9  The  meeting  was  oalled  to  order  and  Louis  M.  Sanders 
10  was  chosen  chairman  and  Frederick  C.  Fischer  Secretary. 


11  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to  the  elec¬ 

tion 

12  of  officers  for  the  ensuing  year. 

13  Motion  carried. 


The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  officers 
and  the 

following  were  elected. 


Louis  M.  Sanders 
William  Pelzer 
Frederick  C.  Fischer 


President 
Vice  President 
Secretary  and  Treasurer 


The  statutory  oath  was  then  administered  to  the 
Secretary. 

Moved  and  seconded  that  an  assessment  of  one 
hundred  per  cent  he  levied  on  the  stock  already  subscribed 
Motion  carried. 

The  treasurer  then  reported  that  an  assessment 


assessment 


1  of  one  hundred  per  cent  on  the  stock  already  subscribed  had 

2  been  paid  in  full. 

3  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  Treasurer  be  authorized 

4  to  purchase  the  necessary  books  and  stationery  and  to  de¬ 

fray 

5  the  expense  of  incorporation. 

6  Mot  ion  oarried. 

7  The  following  resolution  was  then  presented  and  on  motion 

8  duly  seconded  was  unanimously  adopted. 

9  "Resolved  that  the  Treasurer  be  authorized  to 

10  "dispose  of  the  stook  in  the  treasury  of  the  Coiuxiany 

11  "at  par,  first  offering  it  to  the  present  stock- 

12  "holders  of  the  Company  in  proportion  to  their 

13  "respective  holdings.", 

14  Louis  H.  Sanders  then  tendered  his  resignation 

15  as  President  and  director  of  the  Company  to  take  effect  at 

the 

&6  adjournment  of  the  present  meeting. 

17  On  motion  his  resignation  was  accepted. 

18  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  Board  proceed  to  the 

19  election  of  a  director  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the  board 

20  Mot  ion  carried. 

21  The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a  director 

22  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the  board  and  John  V.  Miller  was 

23  elected  director. 

24  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to  the 

25  eleot ion  of  a  President  to  fill  the  vacancy  caused  by 

26  the  resignation  of  Louis  M.  Sanders. 

27  Mot  ion  oarried. 


X  She  mooting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a 

2  President  and  John  V.  Miller  was  elected  President. 

3  William  Pelzer  then  tendered  hia  resignation  as 

4  Vice  President  and  direotor  of  the  Company,  to  take  effect 

5  on  the  adjournment  of  the  present  meeting. 

6  On  Motion  Mr,  Pelzer's  resignation  as  Vioe  President 

7  and  direotor  was  accepted. 

8  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to 

9  the  election  of  a  direotor  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the 

10  Board  caused  by  the  resignation  of  Mr.  Pelzer. 

11  Mot  ion  carried. 

12  The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a 

13  director  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the  Board  and  Howard 

14  W.  Hayes  was  duly  elected  director. 

15  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to  the 

16  election  of  a  Vice  President,  to  fill  the  vacancy  caused 

17  by  the  resignation  of  Mr.  Pelzer. 

18  Mot  ion  carried. 

19  The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a 

20  Vice  President  and  Howard  W.  Hayes  was  duly  elected 

21  Vioe  President . 

22  Prederick  C.  Pischer  then  tendered  his  resignation 

23  as  Secretary  and  Treasurer  and  director  of  the  Company 

24  to  take  effect  on  the  adjournment  of  the  present  meeting 

25  On  motion  his  resignation  was  aooapted. 


X  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  Board  prooeed  to  the 

2  election  of  a  director  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the  Board 

3  Motion  carried. 

4  The  mooting  than  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a 

6  director  to  fill  tho  vacancy  in  the  Board  and  John 

6  F.  Randolph  wa3  elected  director. 

7  Moved  and  seconded  that  the  meeting  proceed  to 

8  the  Election  of  a  Secretary  and  Treasurer  to  fill  the 

9  vacancy  caused  hy  the  resignation  of  Mr.  Fischer. 

10  Motion  carried. 

11  The  meoting  then  proceeded  to  the  election  of  a 

12  Secretary  and  Treasurer  and  John  F.  flandolph  was  elected 

13  Secretary  end  Treasurer. 

14  On  motion  the  meeting  adjourned. 

15  Fred’M  C.  Fi sober. 

16  Secretary. 


X  Special  Meeting  of  the  Board  of  Directors 

2  -of  t  he- 

S  Hew  Jersey  Patent  Company. 

4  Held  at  the  office  of  the  Company  on  Monday  June  22,1903 

5  at  throe  o'clock  P.  M. 

6  Present:  Howard  W.  Hayeo  and  J.  P.  Bandolph,  a  majority 

of 

7  of  the  Board  of  Directors. 

8  The  Vice  President,  Howard  W.  Hayes,  in  the  chair. 

9  On  motion  duly  seconded  and  unanimously  carried  the 

Treasurer 

10  was  authorized  to  open  a  Bank  acoount  in  the  name  Oi  the 

11  Compary,  and  that  all  checks,  araftB  and  notes  drawn  hy  the 

12  Company  should  he  signed  hy  him. 

13  There  being  no  further  business  u  on  motion  duly  seconded 

14  the  meeting  adjourned.' 

15  J.  B.  Bandolph 


16 


Seoretary . 


SpeoiaX  Meeting  of  the  Board  of  Directors 


2  -of  the- 

3  Hew  Jersey  Patent  Company. 

4  Held  at  the  office  of  the  Company  on  August  31st,  1903 

5  at  eleven  thirty  o'clock  A.  .M. 

6  Present:-  Howard  W.  Hayes  and  J.  P.  Bandolph  a  majority 

7  of  the  Board. 

8  The  Vice-President,  Howard  W.  Hayes,  in  the  chair. 

9  Upon  motion  duly  seconded  and  unanimously  carried  the 

10  following  resolution  was  adopt ed:- 

11  "RESOLVED,  that  William  E.  Gilmore,  of  the  City  of  Orange 

12  Hew  Jersey,  he  and  he  hereby  is  authorised  to  execute  in 

13  the  name  and  on  behalf  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Company, 

14  a  corporation  organized  under  the  laws  of  the  State  of  Hew 

15  Jersey,  licenses  under  any  Patents  owned  in  whole  or  in 

16  part  by  the  said  corporation,  or  under  which  it  holds 

17  licenses  to  such  persons  or  corporations,  and  under  such 

18  terms  as  he  may  deem  advisable." 


There  being  no  further  business  upon  motion 
duly  seconded  the  meeting  adjourned. 

J.  P.  Randolph, 


Secretary. 


1  Special  Meeting  of  the  Board  of  Directors 

2  -of  the- 

3  New  Jersey  Patent  Company 


4  Hold  at  the  office  of  the  Company  on  September  11th,  1903 
at  twelve 

6  o'clock  noon  pursuant  to  notice. 

6  Present:-  Mesons.  John  V.  Miller  and  J.  P.  Randolph 

7  The  President  in  the  Chair. 

8  The  Secretary  reported  that  the  purpose  of  this  meeting 

was  t,o 

9  elect  a  direotor  to  fill  the  vacancy  in  the  Board  caused  by 

the 

10  resignation  of  Howard  W.  Hayes. 

11  On  motion  duly  made  and  seconded  and  by  the  affirmative 

13  vote  of  all  present  William  35.  Oilmore  was  regularly  nomi¬ 

nated 

13  and  duly  eleoted  Director  and  Vioe-President  to  fill  the 

vacancy  for 

14  the  unexpired  ten. 

15  There  being  no  further  business  upon  motion  duly  seconded 

16  the  meeting  adjourned? 

17  J.  P.  Randolph, 


18 


Secretary. 


1  Special  Koeting 

2  Special  mooting  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  New 

3  Jersey  Patent  Company  held  this  twenty-sixth  day  of 

4  January i  nineteen  hundred  and  six,  at  the  laboratory 

5  of  Thomas  A.  Edison,  at  four  o’clock  in  the  afternoon 

6  pursuant  to  notice. 

7  Present 

8  John  V.  Hiller 

9  John  7?.  Randolph 

10  Ur.  John  V.  ’filler,  the  President,  presided  as 

11  chairman  of  the  meeting. 

12  Mr.  John  P.  Randolph  the  Secretary,  then  read  the 

13  copy  of  the  notice  sent  to  the  directors  specifying  the 

14  purpose  of  this  meeting. 

15  "West  Orange,  N.J.,  Jan.  15th, 1906. 

16  Dear  Sir:- 

17  A  special  meeting  of  the  hoard  of  directors  of  the  New 

IB  Jersey  Patent  Company  will  be  held  on  the  twenty-sixth 

19  day  of  January,  1906,  for  the  purpose  of  amending  and 

20  changing  the  charter  of  this  Company  and  pass  the 

21  necessary  preambles  and  resolutions  for  the  consideration 

by 

22  of  the  stockholders  at  a  meeting  to  be  called  them 

23  to  specially  act  upon  the  same. 

24  Yours  truly, 

25  John  P.  Randolph, 

26  Secretary." 


X  The  meeting  then  proceeded  to  the  discussion  of  the 

2  amendments  and  changes  necessary. 

3  It  vma  on  motion  duly  made  and  seconded  and  by  the 

4  unanimous  consent  of  all  present  - 

5  HESOLVED,  That  the  charter  of  this  Company,  dated 

6  April  23,  1903,  be  amended  as  follows:  Insert  at  the  end 

7  of  Seotion  3,  mating  the  following  a  part  thereof,  viz:- 

8  -1- 

,9  To  manufacture,  purchase  or  otherwise  acquire 

10  goods,  wares,  merchandise  and  personal  property  of  every 

11  class  and  descript  ion,  and  to  hold,  own,  mortgage,  sell 

12  or  otherwise  dispose  of,  trade,  deal  in  and  deal  with 

13  the  same. 

14  -2- 

15  To  acquire  and  undertake  the  goodwill,  property, 

16  rights,  franchise  and  assets  of  evejy  kind  and  the  liabili- 

17  ties  of  any  person,  firm,  association  or  corporation, 

18  either  wholly  or  partly,  and  to  pay  for  the  same  in  cash, 

19  stock  or  bonds  of  the  corporation,  or  otherwise. 

20  -3- 

21  To  enter  into,  make,  perform  and  carry  out  contracts 

22  of  every  kind  and  for  any  lawful  purpose  with  any  person, 

23  fin#,  association  or  corporation. 


1  -4- 

2  To  borrow  or  raise  money  without  limit  as  to  amount 

3  by  the  iesue  of  or  upon  debentures  or  debenture  stock,  or  in 

4  such  other  manner  as  the  corporation  shall  think  fit. 

5  -5- 

6.  To  draw,  make,  endorse,  accept,  discount,  execute, 

7  and  issue  promissory  notes,  bills  of  exchange,  warrants, 

8  bonds,  debentures  and  other  negotiable  or  transf errable  in- 

9  strunents. 

10  -6- 

11  To  take  out  patents,  acquire  those  taken  out  by  others, 

12  acquire  or  grant  licenses  in  respect  to  patents,  or  work 

13  transfer,  or  do  whatever  else  with  them  may  be  thought  fit. 

14  -7- 

15  To  conduct  business  in  any  of  the  states,  territories, 

16  colonies  or  dependencies  of  the  United  States,  in  the 

17  District  of  Columbia,  and  in  any  and  all  foreign 

18  countries,  to  have  one  or  more  offices  therein,  and  to 

19  hold,  purchase,  mortgage  and  convey  real  and 

20  personal  property,  without  limit  as  to  amount  therein, 

21  but  always  subject  to  the  laws  thereof. 

22  -8  - 

23  To  remunerate  any  person  or  corporation  for  services 

24  rendered,  or  to  be  rendered,  in  placing  or  assisting  to 

25  place  or  guaranteeing  the  placing  of  any  of  the  shares 

26  of  stock  of  the  corporation,  or  any  debentures  or  other 

27  securities  of  the  corporation,  or  in  or  about  the  formation 


1  or  promotion  of  the  corporation,  or  in  the  conduct  of  its 

2  business. 

3  -9- 

4  Subject  to  the  provisions  of  law  to  purchase,  hold  and 

5  re-issue  the  shares  of- its  capital  stock. 

6  -10- 

7  To  do  any  or  all  of  the  things  herein  set  forth  to  the 

8  same  extent  as  natural  persons  might  or  oould  do,  and 

9  in  any  part  of  the  world. 

10  The  forfegoing. clauses  shall  be  construed  both  as  objeots 

11  and  powers. 

12  In  general,  to  carry  on  any  other  business  in  connection 

13  with  the  foregoing,  whether  manufacturing  or  otherwise, 

14  and  to  have  and  to  exercise  all  the  powers  conferred  by  the 

15  laws  of  New  Jersey  upon  corporations  formed  under  the  "Act 

16  Concerning  Corporations"  (revision  of  1896)  and  the  acts 

17  amendatory  thereof  and  supplemental  thereto;  it  being 

18  hereby  expressly  provided  that  the  foregoing  enumeration 

19  ofl  specific  powers  shall  not  be  held  to  limit  or  restrict 

20  in  any  manner  the  powers  of  the  corporation. 

21  The  board  of  directors  shall,  in  addition  to  the 

22  powers  conferred  by  statute,  have  power:- 

23  -11- 

24  To  hoi'fl  their  meetings,  to  have  one.  or  more  offices, 

26  and  to  keep  the  books  of  the  corporation  within  or  without 


X  the  State  of  New  Jersey,  at  such  places  as  may  befrom  time 

2  to  time  designated  by  them,  but  the  Company  shall  always 

3  keep  at  its  principi.1  and  registered  office  in  New  Jersey  a 

4  transfer  book  in  which  the  transfers  of  stock  can  be  made 
efite  entered  and  registered,  and  also  a  stock  book  containing 

6  the  names  and  addresses  of  the  stockholders  and  the 

7  number  of  shares  held  by  them  respectively,  which  said 

8  transfer  book  and  stock  book. shall  be  at  all  times 

9  during  business  hours  open  to  the  inspection  of  the  stock 

holders 

10  in  person.  Any  stockholder  of  record  shall  be  entitled 

11  to  a  list  of  the  stockholders,  with  the  addresses 

12  thereof  and  the  number  of  shares  held  by  each  respectively 

13  upon  prepayment  to  the  registered  agent  in  New  JsrBey 

14  of  a  reasonable  charge  for  making  a  copy  thereof. 

15  -12- 

16  Subject  as  aforesaid,  to  determine  from  time  to  time 

17  whether  and  if  allowed,  under  what  conditions  and 

18  regulations,  the  accounts  and  books  of  the  company 

19  (other  than  the  stock  and  transfer  hook)  or  any  of  them, 

20  shall  be  open  to  the  inspection  of  the  stockholders,  and 

21  the  stockholder's  rights  in  this  respect  are  and  shall  be 

22  restricted  or  limited  accordingly. 

23  -13- 

24  Without  the  assent  or  vote  of  the  stockholders  to  make, 

26  alter,  amend  and  rescind  the  by-laws  of  this  corporation, 

26  1  to  fix  the  amount  to  be  reserved  as  working  capital,  to 

27  authorize  and  cause  to  be  executed  mortgages  and 

28  liens  without  limit  as  to  amount  upon  the  real  and 

29  personal  property  of  the  corporation,  provided  always, 


1 

that  a  majority  of  the  whole  hoard  concur  therein. 

2  -14- 

3  With  the  consent  in  writing  and  pursuant  also  to  the 

4  affirmative  vote  of  the  holders  of  a  majority  of  the  stock 

issued 

5  and  outstanding,  at  a  stockholders'  meeting  duly  called 

6  for  that  purpose,  to  sell,  assign,  transfer  or  otherwise 

7  dispose  of  the  property  of  the  corporation  as  an  entirety 

8  provided  always  that  a  majority  of  the  whole  hoard 

9  concur  therein. 

10  -15- 

11  If  the  hy-laws  shall  so  provide,  hy  resolution, 

12  passed  hy  a  majority  vote  of  the  whole  hoard,  to  designate 

13  two  or  more  of  their  number  to  constitute  an  executive 

14  committee,  which  committee  shall  for  the  time  being 

15  as  provided  in  said  resolution  or  in  the  hy-laws,  have 

16  and  exercise  all  the  powers  of  the  hoard  of  directors .which 

17  may  he  lawfully  delegated,  in  the  management  of 

18  the  business  and  affairs  of  the  company,  and  shall 

19  have  power  to  authorise  the  seal  of  the  corporation 

20  to  he  affixed  to  all  papers  which  may  require  it. 

21  The  corporation  reserves  the  right  to  amend,  alter, 

22  or  change  any  provision  contained  in  this  certificate 

23  of  incorporation,  in  the  manner  now  or  hereafter 

24  prescribed  hy  statute  and  all  rights  conferred  on 

25  stockholders  herein  are  granted  subject  to  this 


reservat ion. 


X  WRTH3SR  RESOLVED,  That  a  moo  tins  of 

2  to  talcfl  action  upon  the  foregoing  ros 

3  to  he  held  at  the  principal  office  of 

side 

4  Avenue  and  Valley  Road,  West  Orange, 

5  the  fifth  day  of  February,  nineteen  ft 

6  at  eleven  A.  15. 

7  There  being  no  further  business  the 

8  adjourned. 

9 

10 


the  stockholders 
olut ion  be  called 
the  Company  at  Lake- 
New  Jersey,  on 
undred  and  six, 

meeting 


Secretary. 


5 

6 
7 


9 

10 
11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 


Special  meeting  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Company 
held  this  fifth  day  of  Pebruary,  1906,  at  the  laboratory  of 
Thomas  A.  Edison  at  eleven  A.  U.  pursuant  to  notice. 

Present 

John  V.  Hiller 
John  P.  Bandolph 
William  E.  Gilmore 

The  President  called  the  meeting  to  order  at  eleven 
o ' clock 

The  Secretary  then  read  the  notice  sent  to  the  stock¬ 
holders  specifying  the  purpose  of  this  meeting,  a  copy  of 
which  notice  is  as  followB:- 

"West  Orange,  N.J.,  Jan.  26,  1906. 

Dear  Sir:- 

A  special  meeting  of  the  at ockholde rs  of  the  New 
Jersey  Patent  Company  will  be  held  on  the  fifth  day  of 
Pebruary,  1906,  for  the  purpose  of  taking  action  on  the 
amendments  and  changes  to  the  charter  and  by-laws 
of  this  Company,  which  amendments  and  changes 
have  been  reoommended  by  resolution  of  the  board 
of  directors  at  a  meeting  held  on  the  twenty-sixth  day  of 
January,  1906;  and  for  such  other  business  as  may 
come  before  the  meeting  at  that  time. 

Yours  respectfully, 

John  P.  Bandolph 

Secretary. 


adopted  by  the 


The  Secretary  then  read  the  resolution 
board  of 

directors  at  their  meeting  hold  January  2.0, ,  1906,  which  is 


particularly  set  out 
board 

ofi  directors  held  on  a 


Inutes  of  the  meeting  of  the 


After  discussing  the  amendments  and  changes  to  the 
charter 

section  for  section,  it  wa3 


8  That  the  resolutions  embodying  the  amendments 

9  suggested  by  the  directors,  be  and  the  same  are  hereby  a- 

dopt ed 

10  and  ejiproved,  and  the  following  named  stockholders 

11  William  33.  Gilmore,  John  ]?.  Randolph  and  John  V.  Miller, 

12  being  all  stockholders  and  owning  all  the  stock  of  the 

corporation 

13  signed  their  written  assent  to  such  changes  and  amendments. 


14  There  being  no  further  business  the  meeting  adjourned. 


16 


Secretary, 


1  Annual  meet  lng  of  the  stookhol dors  of  the  j>T e\i  Jersey 

2  Patent  Company  hold  this  fifth  dan  of  February,  1906,  at 

the 

3  Laboratory  of  Thomas  A.  Edison,  corner  Lakeside  Avenue  and 

4  Valley  Road,  at  On®  o'clock  P.  M. ,  pursuant  to  notice. 

5  The  meeting  was  called  to  order  by  William  E.  Gilmore 

6  who,  upon  motion,  was  unanimously  chosen  chairman,  and 

7  Mr.  Randolph  was  appointed  Secretary  of  the  meeting. 

8  The  Secretary  then  stated  that  Mr.  John  V.  Miller 

9  had  this  day  transferred  his  st, ock  in  this  Company  to  Mr? 

10  Thomas  A.  Edison. 

11  Upon  motion  duly  made  and  seconded,  it  was 

12  RESOLVED , 

13  That  the  time  within  which  sjrock  can  be 

14  transferred  ypon  the  books  of  the  Company  be  and  the  same 
16  is  hereby  waived,  and  that  Mr.  Edison  be  and  he  Aa  hereby 

16  entitled  to  vote  the  number  of  shares  he  now  holds. 

17  Mot  ion  carried. 

18  The  Secretary  then  read  the  roll  of  stockholders  entitled 

19  to  vote  at  thfcomeeting  with  the  following  result 

20  RARE  NO. OP  SHARES 

21  Thomas  A.  Edison  30  shares 

22  John  P.  Randolph  30  " 


23  William  E.  Gilmoi 


40 


1  being  all  the  stockholders  in  interest  holding  all  the 

stock 

2  issued  and  outstanding  of  the  Company. 

3  The  Secretary  presented  and  read  a  copy  of  notice  of 

4  the  meeting  with  proof  of  the  due  mailing  thereof  to  each 

stock- 

5  holder  of  the  Company  at  least  five  day3  before  the  meeting 

as 

6  required  by  the  by-laws. 

7  The  stock  book  of  the  Company,  together  with  a  full 

8  true  and  complete  list  in  alphabetical  order  of  all  the 

9  stockholders  entitled  to  vote  at  the  ensuing  election, 

10  with  the  residences  of  each  and  the  number  of  shares 

11  held  by  each ,  were  produced  and  remained  during 

12  the  election  open  to  inspection. 

13  Upon  motion  duly  made  and  seconded  the  reading 

14  of  the  minuteB  of  the  last  annual  meeting,  together 

IB  with  all  the  stockholders’  and  directors'  meeting  to  the 

16  present  date,  were  read  and  upon  motion  duly 

17  made  and  seconded  and  by  the  unanimous  consent 

18  of  all  the  stockholders  presont,i  t  was 

19  HBSOIiVKD,  That  the  actions  taken  and  the  resolut  ions 

20  passed  and  a  doptsd,  and  the  contracts  entered  into  by 

21  the  stockholders  and  the  board  of  directors  and  the  offi¬ 

cers 

22  from  the  date  of  the  last  annual  m  eting  of  the  stock- 

23  holders  to  this  date  be  and  the  same  are  hereby  ratified 

24  adopted  and  confirmed. 


1  Upon  motion  duly  made  and  seconded  Messrs.  William 

2  Seize r  sr-d  John  B.  Helm  Wfo  appointed  ins;  actors  of  elec¬ 

tion 

3  and  duly  s'vo rn . 

4  The  following  By-laws  vrero  then  prasonted  to  the 

5  meeting  and  after  being  discussed  section  by  sect icn ,  it 

6  was,  on  motion  duly  mads  and  seconded  and  by  the 

7  unanimous  -vote  of  all  present,  RESOLVED,  that  the  By-Laws 

8  as  presented,  he  and  they  hereby  are  adopted  and  that 

9  all  other  By-Laws  inconsistent  therewith  be  rescinded 

10  The  By-Laws  are  as’ follows 

11  BY- LAV/S  OB  THE  NEW  JERSEY  PATENT  COMPANY. 


12  All  meetings  of  stockholders  shall  be  held  at  the 

13  corner  of  Lakeside  Avenue  and  Valley  Hoad,  West  Orange 

14  the  registered  office,  in  New  Jersey. 


Stockhold-J-5  A  majority  of  the  Bftockh.tJiflued  and  outstanding 
ers 

Meetings  l6  represented  by  the  holders  thereof,  either  in  person  or  by 

17  proxy  shall  be  a  quorum  at  all  meetings  of  stockholders. 


18  The  annual  meeting  of  stockholders,  after  the  year  1906, 

19  shall  be  held  on  the  second  Monday  of  .Tune,  in  each 

20  year  at  ten  o'clock  in  the  forenoon,  when  they  shall 

21  elect,  by  a  plurality  vote,  by  ballot,  the  board  of  direc¬ 

tors 

22  as  constituted  by  these  by-laws,  each  stockholder  being 

23.  entitled  to  one  vote  in  person  or  by  proxy,  for  each 
24  share  of  stock  standing  registered  in  his  or  her  name 

26  on  the  twentieth  day  preceding  the  election,  exclusive  of 
the 

26  day  of  such  election. 


I  Kot  ice  of  the  annual  mealing  shill  be  mailed  to  each 

£  stocfchold oz'  at  hlJj  o  c  her  address  as  the  same  app  are  upon 

S  the.  ro corcls  of  the  oorapaiy  at  least  ten  days  prior  to  the 

mooting. 

4  At  Much  annual  meeting,  if  a  majority  of  the  stock 

5  shall  not  be  represented,  tho  stockholders  present  shall 

have 

6  power  to  adjourn  to  a  day  certain,  and  notice  of  the  m  et- 

ing 

7  of  the  adjourned  day  shell  be  given  by  dopo3iting  the  same 

8  in  the  post-office  addressed  to  each  stockholder  at  least 

9  five  days  before  such  adjourned  meet  ing,  exclusive  of  the 

10  day  of  mailing,  but  if  a  majority  of  the  stock  be  present 

II  in  person  or  by  proxy,  they  shall  have  po  e’er  from  time 

12  to  time  to  adjourn  the  annual  meeting  to  any  subsequent 

13  day  or  days,  and  no  notice  of  the  adftoufcned  mooting  need 

14  be  given. 


15  Special  meetings  of  the  stockholders  shall,  at  the 
10  request  of  a  majority  of.  the  directors,  be  called  by  the 
17  secretary  by  mai  ling  a  notice  at  at  ing  the  object  of 

18  such  mee  ting,  at  least  two  days  prior  to  the  data  of 

19  meeting,  to  each  stockholder  of  reoord  at  his  address 

20  as  the  same  appears  on  tho  records  of  the  company. 


Directors  21 
22 

23 

24 

25 


The  directors,  three  in  number,  shall  be  chosen  from 
the  stockholders  and  shall  hold  office  for  one  year  or 
until  others  are  elected  and  qualified  in  their  stead. 
Tho  number  of  directors  may  be  increased  or  decreased 
by  amendment  of  this  provision  of  the  by-laws. 


A  majority  of  the 
quo  ru$ 

for  th*  transact  ion  of  Vci) 


s!;all  constitute  a 


Director's3  Meetings  of  the  hoard  may  he  called  hy  the  president  on 

Meetings; 

Quorum.  4  one  day's  notice  hy  mail  or  personally  to  each  director. 


5  The  directors  may  hold  their  meetings  and  have  an 

6  office  and  keep  the  hooks  of  the  company  (except  the  stock 

7  and  transfer  hooks)  outside  of  tho  State  of  3Tew  Jersey. 


8 

Powers  of  9. 
Directors 

10 

11 

12 


The  hoard  of  directors  shall  have  the  management  of  the 
business  of  the  company,  and  may,  subject  to  the  provisions 

of  the  statute,  of  the  charter  and  these  by-la?/s,  exercise 
all  such 

powers  and  do  all  such  things  as  may  he  exercised  or  done 
hy  the  corporation. 


Executive  43 
Committee 

14 

16 

16 


There  may  he  an  executive  committee  appointed  hy  the 
hoard  who  shall  meet  when  they  see  fit .  They  shall  have 

authority  to  oxnroise  all  the  powers  of  the  hoard  at  any 
time 

when  the  hoard  is  not  in  session. 


17 

Officers.  18 
19 


21 


At  the  first  meeting  after  the  annual  election  of  direc¬ 
tors 

when  there  shall  he  a  quorum,  the  hoard  of  directors  shall 
elect  a.  president  and  vice-president  from  their  own  number 
who  shall  hold  office  for  one  year  and, until  his  successor 
is  appointed  and  qualified. 


22  The  hoard  shall  also  annually  choose  a  secretary 

23  and  a  treasurer,  who  need  not  he  a  member  of  the  hoard, 

24  who  shall  hold  offioe  for  one  year,  subject  to  removal 


at  any  time 

1  by  the  board  with  or  without  cause.  The  board 

2  may  also  appoint  and  remove  suoh  other  offioers  and  agents 

3  as  they  deem  proper. 


President  4 

5 

6 

7 

8 


Vice-  9 
President 

10 


The  president  shall  be  the  chief  executive  officer,  and 

head  of  the  company,  and  in  the  recess  of  the  board  of 

directors  and  of  the  executive  committee  shall  have  general 

control  and  management  of  its  business  and  affairs 

He  shall,  with  the  treasurer,  Bign  all  certificates  of 
stock. 

The  vice-president  shall  perform  all  duties  of  the  pre¬ 
sident 

in  his  absence. 


11  The  secretary  shall  be: ex-officio  clerk  of  the  board  of 

12  directors  and  of  the  standing  committees;  he  shall  attend 

13  all  sessions  of  the  board,  and  shall  record  all  votes 

14  and  the  minutes  of  all  proceedings  in  a  book  to  be 

15  kept  for  that  purpose. 

16  He  shall  give  notice  of  all  calls  for  instalments  to 

17  be  paid  by  the  stockholders,  and  shall  see  that  proper 

notioe 

18  is  given  of  all  meetings  of  the  stockholders  and  of  the 

19  board  of  directors. 

20  He  shall  be  sworn  to  the  faithful  discharge  of  his 

21  duty  and  shall  perform  such  duties  as  may  be 

22  required  by  the  board  of  directors  or  the  president. 


23 


The  24 
Treasurer 

25 


27 


The  treasurer  shall  keep  full  and  accurate  accounts 
of  receipts  and  disbursements  in  books  belonging  to 
the  company  and  shall  deposit  all  moneys  and 
other  valuable  effeots  in  the  name  and  to  the 
credit  of  the  company  in  such  depositories  as 


1  may  be  designated  by  the  President  or  the  board  of  direc¬ 

tors. 

2  He  shall  disburse  the  funds  of  the  Company  as  may 

3  be  ordered  by  the  President  or  the  board,  taking  proper 

vouchers 

4  for  such  disbursements,  and  shall  render  to  the  president 

5  and  directors  at  the  regular  meetings  of  the  board,  and 

6  whenever  they  may  require  it,  account  of  all  his  tranBao- 

t  ions 

7  as  treasurer  and  of  the  financial  condition  of  the  comjjany 

8  He  shall,  with  the  president,  sign  all  certificates  of 

stock. 

Treasurer'S  The  Treasurer  shall  give  a  bond  to  the  Company 

Bond 

10  for  the  faithful  discharge  of  his  duties  in  such  sum 

11  and  with  such  surety  as  the  board  may  require. 


12  If  the  office  of  any  director  or  member  of  the  exe- 
Vacancles  13  cutive  committee,  or  of  the  president,  vice-president, 

14  secretary  or  treasurer,  one  or  more,  becomes  vacant, 

15  by  reason  of  death,  resignation,  disqualification  or 

16  otherwise,  the  remaining  directors,  although  less 

17  than  a  quorum,  by  a  majority  vote,  may  elect  a 

18  successor  or  successors,  who  shall  hold  offloe  for 

19  the  unexpired  tern. 


Duties  of  go  In  case  of  the  absence  of  an  officer  of  the  company, 
Officers 

May  I56  21  or  for  any  other  reason  that  may  seem  sufficient  to 

Delegated 

22  the  board,  the  board  of  directors  may  delegate  his 

23  power  and  duties  for  the  time  being  to  any  other 

24  officer,  or  to  any  director. 


Fiscal  26 


The  fiscal  year  of  the  company  Bhall  begin  the 


Year. 


26  first  day  of  March  in  each  year. 


1  Dividends  upon  the  capital  stock  of  the  company  when 

2  earned  shall  he  payable  at  such  times  as  the  hoard  of 

3  directors  may  deem  advisable. 


Dividends  5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 
11 
12 


Before  payment  of  any  dividends  or  making  any 

distribution  of  profits,  there  may  be  set  aside  out  of  the 
net 

profits  of  the  company  such  sun  or  sums  as  the  directors 
from  time  to  time  in  their  absolute  discretion  think 
proper  as  a  reserve  fund  to  meet  contingencies,  or  for 
equalizing  dividends,  or  for  repairing  or  maintaining 
qny  property  of  the  company,  or  for  any  other  such 
purpose  as  the  directors  shall  think  conducive  to  the 
interests  of  the  company. 


Waiver  of  13  Any  stockholder  or  director  may  waive  any  notice 
Notice 

14  required  to  be  given  under  these  by-laws. 


15 


26 

26 


The  stockholders  by  the  vote  of  a  majority  of  the  stock 
issued  and  outstanding,  may  at  any  annual  or  special 
meeting  alter,  or  amend  thBae  by-laws  if  notioe  thereof 
be  contained  in  the  notice  of  the  meeting. 

The  board  of  directors  by  a  vote  of  the  majority  members 
may  alter  or  amend  these  by-laws  at  any  time  provided 
three  days'  notioe  in  writing  shall  have  been  givon,to  each 
of  the  directors  of  the  proposed  amendment,  or  the  same 
may  be  amended  at  any  regular  or  special  meeting 
of  the  board  without  notice,  provided  all  the  directors 
are  present  and  consent  unanimously  to 
any  proposed  amendment. 


1  Upon  motion  duly  made  and  aeoonded  the  meeting 

2  proceeded  to  the  nomination  and  election  of  three  directors 

3  by  ballot ,  in  accordance  with  the  by-laws  and  the 

4  polls  were  opened  at  one  fifteen  P.  M.  and  the  stock- 
6  holders  prepared  their  billots  and  delivered  them  to 

6  the  inspectors. 

7  After  all  the  ballots  had  been  cast  the  inspectors 

8  reported  the  following  result:  That  there  had  been 

9  three  ballots  oast  representing  one  hundred  shares  of  stool: 

10  being  all  the  oapital  stock  of  the  Company  issued  and 

11  put  standing;  that  the  ballots  had  been  oast  for 

12  Thomas  A.  Edison,  'William  E.  Gilmore  and  John  E. 

13  Randolph;  and  that  each  of  said  stockholders 

14  received  one  hundred  votes. 

15  The  chairman  then  declared  Messrs.  Thomas 

16  A.  Edison,  William  E.  Gilmore  and  John  E.  Randolph 

17  elected  directors  to  serve  for  the  ensuing  year  and 

18  until  their  suooeBsora  should  be  elected. 

19  On  motion  the  meeting  adjourned  to  Monday 

20  the  19th  day  of  Eebruary,  at  eleven  A.  M. 

21 
22 


Secretary. 


1  Meeting  of  the  hoard  of  directors  of  the  New  Jersey 

2  Patent  Company  held  this  fifth  day  of  Pehrrary,  1906,  at 

the 

3  laboratory  of  Thomas  A.  Edison,  corner  lakeside  Avenue  and 

4  Valley  Road,  at  two  o'clock  in  the  afternoon,  for  the  pur¬ 

pose 

5  of  organizing  the  hoard  of  directors  and  electing  officers 

6  for  the  ensuing  year. 

7  Hr.  William  E.  Gilmore  presided  as  temporary  chairman 

8  of  the  meeting  and  Mr.  John  E.  Randolph  as  temporary 

9  Secretary  of  the  meeting. 

10  The  chairman  oalling  the  meeting  to  order  stated 

11  its  purpose. 

12  It  was  moved  that  the  meeting  proceed  to  the 

13  election  of  officers  to  serve  for  the  ensuing  year  and 

until 

14  their  sucoeesorB  should  he  elected  or  chosen. 

16  On  motion  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison  was  nominated 

16  for  President. 

17  There  being  no  other  nominations  the  nominations 

18  were  ordered  closed  and  the  Secretary  was  instructed  to 

19  cast  the  ballot . 

20  He  reported  that  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison  had 

21  received  all  the  votes. 

22  The  chairman  then  declared  Mr.  Thomas  A. 

23  Edison  unanimously  elected  President  of  the  Company 

24  to  serve  for  the  ensuing  year  and  until  his 


1  successor  shoxild  be  chosen. 

2  On  motion  Mr.  William  IS.  Gilmore  was  nominated  &ax. 

3  for  Vico  President. 

4  There  being  no  other  nominations  the  nominations 

5  were  ordered  olosed  and  the  Secretary  was  instructed  to 

6  cast  the  ballot . 

7  He  reported  that  Mr.  William  E.  Gilmore  had  received 

8  all  the  votes. 

9  The  chairman  then  declared  Mr.  William  E.  Gilmore 

10  unanimously  elected  Vice-President  of  the  Company 

11  to  serve  for  the  snsuing  year  and  until  his  successor 

12  should  be  elected. 

13  On  motion  Mr.  «Tohn  P.  Randolph  was  nominated 

14  for  Treasurer. 

15  There  being  no  other  nominat ions  the  nominations 
15  were  ordered  closed  and  the  Secretary  was  instructed 

17  jto  oast  the  ballot. 

18  He  reported  that  Mr.  John  P.  Randolph  had  received 

19  all  the  votes. 

20  The  chairman  then  declared  Mr.  John  P.  Randolph 

21  unanimously  eleoted  Treasurer  of  the  Company  to 

22  serve  for  the  ensuing  year  and  until  his  successors 

23  should  be  chosen v*. 


X  On  mot  ion  duly  made  and  seconded  the  chairman 

2  was  requested  to  appoint  a  Secretary  to  hold  office  at  the 

3  pleasure  of  the  heard  of  directors. 

4  The  chairman' then  appointed  Mr.  Alphonse  West ee 

5  Secretary  of  the  Company  to  hold  office  at  the  pleasure  of 

6  the  hoard  of  directors.  ' 

7  There  being  no  further  business  the  meeting  adjourned 

8  to  meet  on  the  19th  day  of  February,  1906. 

9 


10 


Secretary, 


New  Jersey  Patent  Company  Records 
Letterbook  (1908-1910) 

This  letterbook  covers  the  period  February  1 908-June  1910  It  contains 
four  letters  signed  by  Edison  as  president  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  and 
two  letters  by  Harry  F.  Miller,  secretary  and  treasurer.  One  of  Edison's  letters 
agrees  to  pay  Jonas  W.  Aylsworth  $20,000  and  Walter  H.  Miller  $10,000  for 
making  a  commercially  viable  eight-minute  record.  The  front  cover  is  marked 
1 908  1 91 0  N.J.  Patent  Co."  The  spine  is  stamped  "Letters"  and  "3."  The  book 
contains  298  numbered  pages;  it  has  been  used  to  page  7. 

All  of  the  documents  have  been  selected. 


IT  E  W  JERSEY  PATENT  C  OK?  A  IT  Y 

Orange,  w.  J.,  Pet.  19,1903 

A  Rational  Bank, 

Newark,  Nc  J. 

At  a  special  meriting  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  this 
eld  Feb.  17,  1903,  Hr.  Harry  3?.  Miller  was  elected 
of  the  r.oir.j'a ay,  to  take  the  plo.ee  of  Mr.  John  ?.  Randolph 
and  lir.  Jno.  ?.  Miller  was  elected  Assistant  Treasurer; 


allowing  resolution  was  adopted: 


VTCU,  that  on  and  after  the  13  th  day  of  February,  1908, 
d  notes  drawn  by  the  New  Jersey  Patent  Ooaroany  3hail  be 
H.  F.  Miller  as  Treasurer,  or  by  J  V.  Miller  as 
Treasurer,  and  countersigned  bv  the  President  or  Vice- 


HIM  JKmip.Y  PA'l'RHT  COKPAJSY. 

jkjbsot  LABfW^fMsr,  .ormssb,  ipv  j-jfisKy. 


Mpv.  fith  190& . 

PVwftWSttl  3Mg., 

SS»« j  OTa  r§b  jr , 

Wii^fcid  rtv»4  fcd’.  1  Vto  «ki*&a 

^wl  -JP6.  jfc  for  IK  ttia*‘feii  of  Stock  of  the 

7Jgfig3xtin  S'hcno^jnaph  Co,  Vji.2.1  you  ^noet  *Jio  Bfwrn  and  ianUa 
nSi?  to  -tha  fi?).lq^j.t\R : 

%/H ’  J0MfV«9  tp  #?»  J!«p  jTfPfpy  fftfS*  op, 

Jo  jff.  K.  pplbe,;v 

\*\  h  ,v‘  ffffti- ' 

1  to  J«  K.  gejlm 

to  y.  L.  '.Sy#? 

K^rjs  rpy  tp-4/f 
^J(\. 

?«wj9i£ant . 


soy  laboratory  , 


pr<V(  JSRSlvV  COUP  A-'  -  « 

ORAPGP,  nBWS*‘ 


,7 unvary  IS  tin  OS- 


,  7,  S  >  t-ciSa*. 


■  i  y-ifth  Avc.,  Hew  Ypr*. 

Jnov.«.tf  «,*  »-•  5  f" 

o  ,«  -  *«•-**  -  ^  ”•  °*r:r: 

fl„d  ^uu**  no.  .  m-  on.  — »  *»  «*  *f 
mm  M  «-»  “  »“=■  °f  **”  “°W“y 


Yours  truly  i 


How  Jersey  Patent  Go. 

Edison  Laboratory.  Orange,  Hew  Jersey. 


Masers.  Aylsworth  &  Miller! 

In  consideration  of  making  the 
small  reoord  with  400  threads,  running  eight  minutes 
satisfactory  and  when  it  is  commercially  sold;  Me  agree 
to  pay  J-  W.  Ay Is worth  Twenty  thousand  ($20,000,00) 
Dollars  and  M.  H.  Miller  Ten  thousand  {$10,000.00) 

Dollars . 

Hew  J ■re^y.Patent'  Company  . 


fterf  jersey  rkeehi  coicpaity. 
EDI^C''}  ^J^QKATORi' .  xbRXNflli ,  iTKW  JERSEY. 


k.  ftotire,  Bsq.^ 

Vancouver ,  Wsts&t* 

Dear  Sir: 

Younu  of  tfc<*  3$A  $WMP  ** 

two  of  your  pate^u^  .  In  reply  f  1»9 

«L9  Sfa^a  and  b«S  to  £  1st  ft  tea*  oe  ova  not 

iqt^qs^ad  in.  te«-  w»  • 


,jr*%  rsjisjjY  bat:jjk(p  c  . 

Op*Mf>,  vw  f«rw- 

1<>. 

t ty  $>t  SAuturlot  <af  u«w 

Ifco  undersigned ,  being  required  peremptorily  Under  the 
fifth  Buh«divtsiea  of  Section  88  efthe  Ants  of  August  8,  1009,  to 
pay  the  amount  ot  th»  tax  assessed  against  it  UfteU*  said  Aftt  on 
or  before  the  thirtieth  day  of  Jufte,  1910,  and  haVihg  nd  other  way 
of  avoiding  the  imposition  of  the  penalty  of  five  pftf  0*flt»»  of 
the  said  tax  and  interest  nt  on*  per  eentu*  per  se«$h  uj>*n  *al« 
tax  fron;  th«  time  the  same  became  due  for  failure  to  moke  syjeb 
payment  provided  ip  tile  fitb  SUb-divisiOn  of  said  aotion  56,  hereby 
makes  the  payment  herewith  wjdor  pretest  on  the  grounds (1}  that  tfca 
requirement  that  such-  payment  shall  To*  made  and  the  proposed 
imposition  of  the  said  ppnalty,  are  contrsty  to  the  Constitution 
of  the  United  States  and  the  law  of  the  land,  and  are  null,  Vdld 
and  illegal;  and  (0)  that  section  58  of  the  Aot  of  August  5,  1900, 
is  unconstitutional. 

The  payment  is  made  under  compulsion  to  avoid  the 
imposition  of  the  penalty  of  five  per  centum  of  tfab  to*.  provided 
for  in  the  Aot  and  the  interest  provided  in  said  Aot  tot  failuw 
to  make  aald  payment,  and  you  and  the  Government  w«  held  liable 
for  any  damage  -tho  undersigned  may  buffer  by  he»eon  dt'  t&sklag  the 


New  Jersey  Patent  Company  Records 
Ledger  (1903-1926) 


This  ledger  covers  the  period  May  1 903  to  February  1911,  with  additional 
entries  from  1917,  1925,  and  1926.  As  the  account  book  of  final  entry,  it 
summarizes  transactions  pertaining  to  the  business  of  the  New  Jersey  Patent 
Co.  Separate  accounts  detail  cash,  general  expense,  experimental,  and  patent 
transactions.  Included  are  accounts  with  Edison,  patent  attorneys,  and  other 
individuals  and  companies.  Edison's  account  covers  the  period  June  1903- 
December  1910,  with  two  additional  entries  from  1 91 7.  The  entry  for  February 
27, 1909,  includes  a  $5,000,000  credit  to  Edison,  indicated  as  "By  Sundries." 
The  front  cover  is  labeled  "Ledger  N.J.  Patent  Co."  The  book  contains  138 
numbered  pages  and  an  index;  many  pages  are  blank. 


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New  Jersey  Patent  Company 
Journal  (1903-1926) 


This  journal  covers  the  period  May  1 903-February  1911,  with  additional 
entries  from  May  1917,  December  1925,  and  February  1926.  Chronological 
entries  provide  information  about  transactions  posted  to  various  accounts  and 
recorded  in  the  corporate  ledger.  The  journal  is  a  partial  record  and  does  not 
provide  information  about  all  of  the  posted  transactions.  The  entries  from 
February  1 91 1  detail  the  sale  of  the  company's  property  rights  to  Thomas  A. 
Edison,  Inc.,  for  $200,000  in  stock.  The  entries  from  1917  are  in  the  form  of 
directors'  minutes  and  indicate  the  sale  of  the  company's  stock  in  Thomas  A. 
Edison,  Inc.,  and  the  purchase  of  outstanding  New  Jersey  Patent  Co.  stock 
from  Edison  and  his  wife,  Mina  Miller  Edison.  The  front  cover  is  labeled 
"Journal.  N.J.  Patent  Co."The  book  contains  152  numbered  pages;  it  has  been 
used  to  page  57. 


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NORTH  JERSEY  PAINT  COMPANY  RECORDS 


The  North  Jersey  Paint  Co.  was  organized  in  April  1 908.  It  was  a  New 
Jersey  corporation  concerned  primarily  with  the  manufacture  and  sale  of 
waterproof  paint  for  use  with  cement.  Walter  S.  Mallory  served  as  the 
company's  president;  William  H.  Mason,  superintendent  of  the  Edison 
Portland  Cement  Co.  and  later  the  inventor  of  Masonite,  was  secretary- 
treasurer.  Edison  held  the  majority  of  issued  stock.  The  company  was  based 
in  Stewartsville,  New  Jersey,  the  site  of  the  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 
plant,  and  had  a  sales  office  in  New  York  City.  The  records  cover  the  years 
1908-1918.  They  consist  of  two  ledgers,  a  daybook,  and  a  cash  book. 

The  selected  records  are  arranged  in  the  following  order:  (1)  Ledger 
(1908-1910);  (2)  Ledger  (1911-1918);  and  (3)  Daybook  (1908-1918).  One 
cash  book  covering  the  period  1908-1918  has  not  been  selected. 


Ledger  (1908-1910) 


This  ledger  covers  the  period  May  1908-December  1910.  As  the  account  book  of  final 
entry,  it  summarizes  transactions  pertaining  to  the  business  of  the  North  Jersey  Paint  Co. 
Separate  accounts  detail  cash,  general  expense,  sales,  and  other  transactions.  Included  are 
accounts  with  Edison,  the  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co.,  and  other  individuals  and  companies. 

Ledger  (1911-1918) 

This  ledger  covers  the  period  January  1911  -December  1 91 8.  As  the  account  book  of  final 
entry,  it  summarizes  transactions  pertaining  to  the  business  of  the  North  Jersey  Paint  Co. 
Separate  accounts  detail  general  expense,  sales,  and  other  transactions. 

Daybook  (1908-1918) 

This  daybook  covers  the  period  May  1908-December  1918.  Chronological  entries  provide 
information  about  transactions  posted  to  various  accounts  and  recorded  in  the  general  ledgers. 

Cash  Book  (1908-1918)  [not  selected] 

This  cash  book  covers  the  period  July  1908-January  1918.  Chronological  entries  provide 
information  about  transactions  posted  to  the  cash  account. 


North  Jersey  Paint  Company  Records 
Ledger  (1908-1910) 

This  ledger  covers  the  period  May  1 908-December  1 91 0.  As  the  account 
book  of  final  entry,  it  summarizes  transactions  pertaining  to  the  business  of  the 
North  Jersey  Paint  Co.  Separate  accounts  detail  cash,  general  expense,  sales, 
and  other  transactions.  Included  are  accounts  with  Edison,  the  Edison  Portland 
Cement  Co.,  and  other  individuals  and  companies.  The  front  cover  is  stamped 
"Ledger  The  North  Jersey  Paint  Co."  The  book  contains  136  numbered  pages 
and  an  index;  some  pages  are  blank. 


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North  Jersey  Paint  Company  Records 
Ledger  (1911-1918) 

This  ledger  covers  the  period  January  1911-December  1918.  As  the 
account  book  of  final  entry,  it  summarizes  transactions  pertaining  to  the 
business  of  the  North  Jersey  Paint  Co.  Separate  accounts  detail  general 
expense,  sales,  and  other  transactions.  The  front  cover  is  stamped  "General 
Ledger  Accounts  North  Jersey  Paint  Compaint  [sic]  January  191 1 -December, 
1918"  and  "3-25. "The  spine  is  marked  "3"  and  "25."  The  pages  are  numbered, 
but  the  sequence  of  numbers  is  irregular.  Approximately  40  pages  have  been 
used. 


/77c?/?  a  factar//??  Account 

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NAME 

ADDRESS 


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North  Jersey  Paint  Company  Records 
Daybook  (1908-1918) 


This  daybook  covers  the  period  May  1 908-December  1918. 
Chronological  entries  provide  information  about  transactions  posted  to  various 
accounts  and  recorded  in  the  general  ledgers.  Page  headings  indicate  that  this 
book  was  kept  at  Stewartsville  (referred  to  as  New  Village  in  the  later  entries). 
The  cover  is  stamped  "Day-Book  The  North  Jersey  Paint  Co."  The  book 
contains  240  numbered  pages;  many  pages  are  blank. 


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PRIMARY  PRINTED  SERIES 

This  collection  contains  printed  documents  issued  by  both  Edison  and 
non-Edison  companies.  Although  the  bulk  of  the  material  consists  of 
promotional  brochures,  there  are  also  official  reports,  instruction  manuals, 
catalogs,  lists  of  equipment  and  devices,  and  reprints  of  scholarly 
papers.  The  items  selected  indicate  specifications  for,  or  improvements  in, 
various  Edison  products;  provide  instructions  for  their  sale  or  use;  describe 
unusual  promotions;  exemplify  strategies  for  marketing;  or  document  the 
commercial  activities  of  Edison's  employees,  business  partners,  and 
subsidiaries.  Other  printed  promotional  material  can  be  found  in  the  National 
Phonograph  Company  Records,  Edison  Storage  Battery  Company  Records, 
and  other  record  groups  in  the  Company  Records  Series. 

In  addition  to  publishing  occasional  brochures,  most  of  Edison's 
companies  issued  serial  publications.  These  included  a  succession  of 
phonograph-related  serials  published  by  the  National  Phonograph  Co.  and  the 
Edison  Business  Phonograph  Co.— The  Phonogram,  The  New  Phonogram, 
Edison  Phonograph  Monthly,  and  Tips— as  well  as  The  Kinetogram,  issued  by 
the  Edison  Manufacturing  Co.,  and  The  Edison  Aggregate,  published  by  the 
Edison  Portland  Cement  Co.  Sample  issues  of  each  publication  have  been 
selected  with  the  exception  of  Tips  and  the  Edison  Phonograph  Monthly,  for 
which  longer  runs  have  been  selected  in  order  to  include  news,  feature  stories, 
and  promotional  material  about  Edison  and  his  products. 

Approximately  1 0  percent  of  the  documents  have  been  selected.  The 
selected  items  are  listed  in  the  accompanying  bibliography.  The  unselected 
material  consists  mainly  of  promotional  brochures  that  provide  routine 
information  about  the  Edison  product  being  advertised;  most  publications  by 
non-Edison  companies;  and  duplicate  copies  of  selected  items.  In  addition,  film 
catalogs  and  phonograph  record  catalogs  have  generally  not  been  selected. 
The  film  catalogs  can  be  found  in  Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers  Microfilm  Edition: 
Motion  Picture  Catalogs  by  American  Producers  and  Distributors,  1894-1908. 
The  information  contained  in  the  record  catalogs  is  available  in  Allen 
Koenigsberg,  Edison  Cylinder  Records,  1889-1912,  2nd  ed.  (Brooklyn,  N.Y.: 
APM  Press,  1 987)  and  similar  publications. 

The  documents  are  arranged  in  three  groups:  (1)  Printed  Material— 
Edison  Companies;  (2)  Printed  Material — Non-Edison  Companies;  and  (3) 
Serial  Publications.  Within  each  group,  the  items  are  organized  alphabetically 
by  company  and  then  chronologically. 


PRINTED  MATERIAL  —  EDISON  COMPANIES 


Bates  Manufacturing  Company 

"Bates  &  Edison  Automatic  Hand  Numbering  Machines."  Form  230. 1904. 

Edison  Business  Phonograph  Company 

"Souvenir  of  the  Thirtieth  Anniversary  of  the  Edison  Business  Phonograph."  1908. 

[Reprint  from  Office  Appliances.  July  lanfl  ] 

The  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business  Phonograph  "  Form 
1475.  1908. 

"The  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business  Phonograph."  Form 
1795.  1910. 

Edison  Manufacturing  Company 

"Battery  Facts. . .  for  Gas  Engine  Manufacturers."  1899. 

"Edison  Primary  Batteries  and  Battery  Fan  Outfits."  Form  128. 1902. 

"Edison  Primary  Batteries."  Form  280. 1906. 

"Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes."  Form  320. 1907. 

"The  Bulletin  of  Edison  Films  for  the  Week  Ending  February  20, 1909 "  Form  418 

1909. 

"Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes."  Form  470. 1910. 

Edison  Ore  Milling  Syndicate,  Ltd. 

"The  Dunderland  Iron-Ore  Deposits  and  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison's  Process."  Ca.  1902. 
Edison  Portland  Cement  Company 

"Works  of  the  Edison  Portland  Cement  Company,  Stewartsville,  New  Jersey."  1902. 
"Edison  Portland  Cement  Co.,  New  Village,  N.J."  Ca.  1909. 

Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery,  1903."  1904. 

"A  Few  Suggestions  for  Central  Station  Managers,  Containing  Some  Advertisements 
We  Have  Used  and  Are  About  To  Use  for  the  New  Edison  Storage  Battery "  Ca 

1910. 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery:  Useful  Information."  Form  90. 1910. 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery."  Form  75. 1910. 

"The  1910  Edison  Storage  Battery,"  by  Walter  Holland.  1910.  [Bound  with  "A  Test  of 
the  Edison  Storage  Battery,"  by  the  Electrical  Testing  Laboratories.  Both  papers 
were  read  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Association  of  Edison  Illuminating 
Companies,  Thousand  Islands,  N.Y.,  September  6-8, 1910.] 

National  Phonograph  Company 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Phonograph  Outfits,  Phonograph  Supplies."  Form  49. 1899 
"Parts  of  Phonographs."  Form  270. 1901. 

"Phonograph  Accessories."  Form  337. 1902. 

"Edison  Phonographs.”  Form  335. 1902.  [With  attached  "Important  Supplement," 

"Jobbers  Discount  Sheet."  Form  355J.  1902. 

"Dealers  Discount  Sheet.”  From  387D.  1902. 


"Directions  for  Setting  Up  and  Operating  the  Edison  Home  Phonograph."  Form  476. 

Ca.  1903.  [Not  selected:  similar  directions  for  the  Gem,  Standard,  and  Triumph 
models.] 

"Just  Airs:  Souvenir  of  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition."  Form  550.  Ca.  1904. 

"Edison  Phonographs."  Form  740. 1905. 

"Edison  Coin-Slot  Phonographs."  Form  910. 1906. 

"How  to  Install  the  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business 
Phonograph."  Ca.  1907.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Records,  Parts,  and  Accessories:  Jobbers'  Discounts."  Form 
1286. 1908. 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Records,  Parts,  and  Accessories:  Dealers’  Discounts."  Form 
1286.  1908. 

"Edison  Amberol  Records:  What  They  Are  and  How  to  Play  Them  on  Your 
Phonograph."  Form  1415.  Ca.  1908. 

"Information  Concerning  and  Directions  for  Putting  the  Combination  Attachment  on  the 
Edison  Home  Phonograph."  Form  468A.  1909.  [Not  selected:  similar  directions 
for  the  Gem,  Standard,  and  Triumph  models.] 

"How  to  Make  Records  at  Home  with  an  Edison  Phonograph."  Form  1090.  Ca.  1910. 

"The  Edison  Phonograph:  A  Catalogue  of  Edison  Phonographs,  Records,  Reproducers, 
Attachments  and  Accessories."  Form  1780. 1910. 

'"My  South  Polar  Expedition'  Vividly  Told  by  Lieut.  E.  H.  Shackleton  on  an  Edison 
Amberol  Record."  Form  1801. 1910. 

"Jobbers'  and  Dealers'  Discounts  and  Net  Prices  on  Edison  Phonographs,  Records, 
Accessories  and  Parts."  1910. 

"Parts  of  Edison  Phonographs,  Reproducers,  and  Attachments."  1910. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Bates  Manufacturing  Company 

"Bates  &  Edison  Automatic  Hand  Numbering  Machines."  Form  230. 1904. 


BATES  & 
EDISON 

Automatic  Hand 
Numbering 
Machines 


Bates  and  Edison 
Automatic  Hand  Numbering 
Machines 


made  at  the  Edison  factories,  Orange, 
by  die  Bates  Manufacturing  Company. 
This  company  has  no  connection  with  any  con¬ 
cern  of  similar  name. 

The  Bates  machine  receives  its  name  from 
its  patentee,  who  sold  his  rights  to  Mr.  Edison. 
These  machines  rank  as  the  leading  devices  of 
their  kind  on  the  market. 

The  Edison  machine  is  put  out  to  meet  the 
demand  fora  lower  priced  numbering  machine 
than  the  Bates.  It  is  the  superior  of  all  low 
priced  machines. 

These  machines  are  the  only  two  hand 
numbering  machines  on  the  market  with  dial 
setting  movements. 

The  Edison  guarantee  for  quality  and  work¬ 
manship  goes  with  both  machines. 

Every  properly  equipped  business  system 
should  ,  have  one  or  more  of  these  machines; 
no  system  can  be  complete  without  one.  There 
is  no  business  or  profession  that  cannot  use 
one  with  advantage  and  profit.  A  few  of  their 
many  uses  are  numbering  checks,  pay-rolls, 
orders,  tickets,  labels,  vouchers,  invoices,  time 
cards,  time  books,  prescriptions,  etc.,  etc., 


Bates  Manufacturing  Co. 


Bates  Numbering  Machines 

Built  to  give  perfect  service  for  a  lifetime,  not  to 
see  how  cheaply  they  can  be  sold 

rpHESE  machines  are  made  in  three  styles: 
1  The  Bates  Automatic  Hand  Numbering 
Machine,  the  Bates  Platform  Automatic 
Hand  Numbering  Machine,  and  the  Bates  Line 
Dating  Machine. 

Bates  Numbering  Machines  are  everywhere 
regarded  as  the  standard  for  quality,  both  in 
construction  and  the  character  of  work  they 
perform.  No  similar  device  commands  so  high 
a  price,  and  the  fact  that  so  many  thousands 
are  yearly  sold  is.  the  best  possible  evidence  of 
the  place  accorded  them  in  the  business  world. 
“Almost  as  good  as  the  Bates”  is  the  best 
claim  ever  made  by  competing  devices. 

Bates  machines  have  these  points  of  excel¬ 
lence:  Their  workmanship  is  of  the  highest 
grade;  all  wearing  parts  are  made  of  steel;  all 
working  parts  are  entirely'onclOsed;  they  work 
noiselessly;  are  perfect  in  design;  simple  in 
operation;  have  an  entirely  automatic  action; 
do  absolutely  accurate  work;  are  compact  and 
light  in  weight;  have  improved  self-inking 
apparatus;  there  is  no  loss  of  space  between 
the  figures.  They  are  guaranteed  in  every 
particular,  and  with  proper  care  will  last  a 
lifetime  and  always  do  good  work. 


Bates  Automatic 
Hand  Numbering  Machine 


J 


Bates  Line  Dating  Machine 

Net  Price,  $9.00 


Styles  of  type. 

Style  J 

JAN  1-1974 

Style  G  Style  K 

AUG  25 1967  NOV  30  1980 

Special  Figura  to  Order 


Includes  bottle  of  inlc,  extra  pad,  and  stylo 


rpHIS  machine  is  similar  in  appearance,  size, 
A  and  construction  to  the  Bates  Automatic 
Hand  Numbering  Machine.  The  work¬ 
manship  is  of  the  highest  grade.  Every  wear¬ 
ing  part  is  made  of  steel,  including  the  dating 
wheels,  and  all  parts  receive  the  finest  finish. 
The  parts  are  interchangeable  to  the  smallest 
screw.  The  machine  weighs  about  sixteen 
ounces,  making  it  light  to  handle,  and  yet  is 
sufficiently  solid  and  firm  to  ensure  speed  and 
ease  in  operation.  It  works  with  slight  fric¬ 
tion  and  noiselessly. 

Every  wheel  except  the  month  wheel  can  be 
“thrown  out”  at  will,  so  that  the  machine  will 
register  the  month,  day  and  year;  the  month 
and  year;  the  month  and  day,  or  the  month 

The  inking  device  is  similar  to  that  attached 
to  the  Bates  Automatic  Numbering  Machine, 
by  which  the  figures  receive  ink  automatically 
from  a  thick  felt  pad  which  is  practically  in¬ 
destructible.  The  machine  is  equipped  with  a 
gauge  plate,  which  enables  the  operator  to 
print  an  impression  on  any  given  line. 


Letter  Wheels 


■YTTE  make  to  order  machines  having  letter 
’  *  wheels,  either  preceding  or  following 
the  figure  wheels.  ' 

The  letters  will  be  engraved  to  match  the 
figures  of  the  machine  in  which  the  letter 
wheels  are  to  be  mounted. 

These  letter  wheels  (which  are  substituted 
for  figure  wheels)  will  be  furnished  at  a  net 
price  of  $1.00  additional  per  letter  wheel,  and 
|  will  be  engraved  with  any  number  of  letters 
|  to  and  including  nine. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Edison  Business  Phonograph  Company 

"Souvenir  of  the  Thirtieth  Anniversary  of  the  Edison  Business  Phonograph." 
1 908.  [Reprint  from  Office  Appliances  July  1 908.] 

"The  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business 
Phonograph."  Form  1475. 1908. 

"The  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business 
Phonograph."  Form  1795. 1910. 


SOUVENIR  OF  THE 

THIRTIETH  ANNIVERSARY  OF  THE 

EDISON  BUSIN  ESS  PHONOGRAPH 

CONTAINING  A  STORY  OF  THE  LIFE  OF  THE 
INVENTOR  AND  AN  ARTICLE  ON  MAKING 
THE  EDISON  BUSINESS  PHONOGRAPH  AND 
A  DESCRIPTION  OF  THE  NEW  INVENTION 
THE  UNIVERSAL  ELECTRIC  MOTOR 


{.Reprinted  from  Office  Appliances  for  July  1 90S] 

MAKING  THE 

EDISON  BUSINESS  PHONOGRAPH 

By  FRANK  E  .  TUPPER 

EASTERN  MANAGER  FOR  OFFICE  APPLIANCES 

A  Trip  Through  the  Orange,  N.  J.,  Factory,  Where  the  Marvelous 
Voice  Writing  Machines  are  Built 


THE  celebrated  English  literateur,  Dean 
Swift,  said  that  the  man  who  ,  makes  two 
blades  of  grass  grow  where  one  grew  before 
deserves  well  of  his  kind.  Had  Swift  Jiyed ' 
in  the  present  generation,  where  it  is  not  unusual 
to  find  men  growing  two  blades  where  but  one 
had  been  before,  it  is  probable  diat  he  would  have 
.made  better  provision  for  acknowledgment  due 
such  a  man  as  Thomas  A.  Edison,  the  great 
inventor,  who  has  done  more  than  any  other  man 
to  advance  the  American  nation  in  the  commercial 
world.  Here  indeed  is  a  man  who  has  made' 
several  blades  grow  where  none  had  previouly 
existed. 

That  a  man  could  start  out-in  life  with  scarcely 
any  education,  apart  from  that  picked  up  at  his 
home,  and,  thrown  upon  his  own  resources  when  f 
but  a  mere  child,  develop  from  newspaper  vendor 
to  publisher,  to.  telegraph  operator  and  then  to 
inventor  of  some  of  the  most  widely  used  products 
in  the  world,  seems  little  short,  of  miraculous. 
Yet  that,,  in  brief,  is  the  story  of  Thomas  Alva 
Edison,  “the  wizard  of  Menlo  Park,”  acknowl¬ 
edged  the  greatest  living  inventor  and  the  man 
who  originated  and  perfected  the  Edison'  Business 
Phonograph. 

Had  a  royalty  been  offered  Edison  for  inven¬ 
tions  of  direct  commercial  value  it  is  exceedingly 
improbable  that  we  would  have  been  favored  with 
more  in  this  line;  With  scarcely  an  exception  his 
inventions  have  been  of  pronounced  value  to  the  ' 
business  world,  and  his  discovery  of  the  business 
phonograph  is  by  no  means  an  exception.  The 
perfected  business  phonograph  is  today  one  of  the 
most  essential  and  valuable  aids  of  the  business  man. 

Edison  Himself 

From  the  time  he  took  out  his  first  patent,  for 
an  electrically  operated  vote  recorder,  in  1869,  ‘up 
to  the  present,  Mr.  Edison  has  given  the  major  ' 
part  of  his  time  to  the  phonograph.  With  all  his 
patents,  and  they  include  so  many  that  at  the  age 
of  24  the  United  States  Patent  Commissioner  re¬ 
ferred  to  him  as  “the  young  man  who  had  kept 
the  path  to  the  patent  office  hot  with  his  foot¬ 


steps,”  the  phonograph  has  always  held  a  first 
place  in  his  esteem.  For  this  reason  the  an¬ 
nouncement  some  time  ago  that  lie  had  perfected 
the  business  phonograph  was  received  with  more 
than  ordinary  interest. 

With  all  his  inventions,  including  telegraph  im¬ 
provements,  electrical  engines,  incandescent  lamps, 
batteries  and  scores  of  things  electrical,  it  is  signifi¬ 
cant  that  the  great  genius  maintains  a  financial  and 
active  interest  in  the  phonograph,  although  he  has 
disposed  of  his  interest  in  most  of  the  Edison 
companies. 

While  the  intent  of  this  article  is  to  give 
readers  of  Office  Appliances  an  insight  into  the 
making,  development  and  uses  of  the  Edison 
Business  Phonograph,  it  would  not  be  complete 
i  without  at  least  a  brief  reference  to  the  career  of 
that:  wonderful  creative  mind  whose  genius  made' 
the.  rnachine  possible. 

Mr.  Edison  was  born  February  11,  1847;  at 
Milan,  Erie  county,  Ohio.  Samuel  Edison,  his 
father,  was  of  Dutch  origin,  and  his  mother, 
Nancy.  Elliot,  Scotch.  His  inventive  '  instincts 
were,  evidenced  early  in  life,  and'  when,  but  IS 
years  .of  age  he  made  some  important  improve¬ 
ments  in  telegraph  apparatus.  The  rejection  of  his 
first  patented  invention,  a  vote  recorder,  already 
referred  to,  by  the  Massachusetts  legislature,  de¬ 
cided  him  to  make  it  a  rule  to  always  investigate 
minutely  the  necessity  of  any  particular  invention 
'  before  attempting  its  reduction  to  practice.  This 
accounts  for  the  noteworthy  fact  that  Edison’s 
inventions  have  been  of  greater  value  to  the  com¬ 
mercial  world  than  those  of  any  other  man. 

Mr.  Edison  worked  put  many  important  patents 
before  accumulating  enough  funds  to  experiment 
on  a  large  scale.  Finally,  the  sale  of  an  invention 
for  $40,000  established  him  with  an  experimenting 
..shop  in  New  York.  His  business  thrived,  and  he 
moved  to  Newark,  N.  J.,  and  took  a  shop  in  which 
he  employed  three  hundred  hands.  Even  with 
this,  for  those  days,  big  staff  Edison  kept  only  pay 
roll  accounts,  preserving  all  bills  and  giving  notes 
in  payment  usually.  Often  he  would  forget  the  jj 
note  until  it  was  protested,  when  he  would  hustle 


for  money  and  pay  it.  He  held  that  this  saved 
the  luimbuggery  of  bookkeeping,  which  he  didn’t 
understand,  and  was  cheaper,  as  protest  fees  were 
only  $1.50  each.  Despite  these  business  methods 
he  had  excellent  credit. 

In  1876  the  Edison  laboratories  and  works 
were  moved  to  Menlo  Park,  N.  J.,  and  ten  years 
later  the  present  plant  in  West  Orange  was  estab¬ 
lished.  There  is  ample  room  for  growth  on  the 
present  site,  and  new  buildings  are  being  added 
from  time  to  time. to  keep  pace  with  the  demands 
of  the  increasing  business.  All  the  more  recently 
erected  buildings  are  of  uniform  size  and  built  of 
concrete.  The  whole  group  of  Edison  buildings 
presents  a  picture  of  astounding  industrial  activity 
when  it  is  considered  that  it  is  a  direct  result  of  the 
inventions  and  enterprise  of  one  lone  man. 

Tlie  great  inventor’s  enormous  capacity  for 
work  is  well  known.  He  has  worked  sixty  hours 
continuously  without  sleep  and  with  little  food,  to 
find  the  cause  of  a  machine’s  refusal  to  work  as  he 
intended  it  should.  His  widely  quoted  “two 
per  cent  inspiration  and  ninety-eight  per  cent 
perspiration”  doubtless  came  as  a  result  of  such 
experiences. 

Notwithstanding  the  fact  that  Mr.  Edison  has 
been  the  recipient  of  honors  from  leading  scientific 
institutions  all  over  the  world,  and  gifts  from 
crowned  heads,  statesmen  and  captains  of  industry, 
lie  has  always  been  of  a  retiring  nature  and  dis¬ 
inclined  to  publicity.  His  laboratory  work 
occupies  most  of  his  time,  and  when  not  there 
he  is  usually  with  his  family  at  his  beautiful  home 
in  Llewellyn  Park,  N.  J.  Of  simple  habits,  he  is  a 
total  abstainer  and  of  late  has  become  a  vegetarian. 
While  it  was  generally  supposed  that  he  retired 
from  active  work  along  commercial  lines  when  he 
had  completed  three  score  years,  he  still  spends 
many  hours  in  his  laboratory  and  lias  announced 
his  intention  of  perfecting  molds  from  which 


concrete  houses  can  be  built  in  a  day  or  two  at  a 
price  within  the  reach  of  the  average  working  man. 

Discovering  the  Principle 

■  The  discovery  of  the  principle  of  the  phono¬ 
graph  Mr.  Edison  attributes  to  an  accident.  Pie 
was  talking  into  the  mouthpiece  of  one  of  his 
telephones  when  the  voice  vibration  sent  the  fine 
steel  point  into  his  finger.  This  led  him  to  the 
conclusion  that  by  recording  the  actions  of  -the 
point  and  afterwards  sending  it  over  the  same  sur¬ 
face  it  would  reproduce  conversation.  He  experi¬ 
mented  with  a  strip  of  telegraph  paper  and  found 
that  the  point  made  an  alphabet.  He  then 
reproduced  words  and  by  continued  experiments 
perfected  the  phonograph  as  known  today  in  every 
civilized  country. 

As  early  as  1878  Mr.  Edison  predicted  among 
the  future  applications  of  the  phonograph  its  use 
for  letter  writing  and  all  kinds  of  dictation.  Like 
most  commercial  successes,  the  business  phono¬ 
graph  has  passed  through  many  and  varied  experi¬ 
mental  stages.  The  first  Edison  company  to 
exploit  phonographs  was  organized  in  1878,  and 
was  capitalized  at  $600,000.  The  public  was  slow 
to  appreciate  the  great  commercial  value  of  the 
machine,  and  it  has  taken  thousands  of  dollars  and 
reams  of  printed  matter  to  place  it  where  it  is 
today,  one  of  the  most  valued  of  office  appliances 
and  used  in  modern  offices  all  over  the  world. 

The  making  of  the  Edison  Business  Phono¬ 
graph  as  found  in  the  modern  office  is  as  interest¬ 
ing  a  study  in  manufacturing  as  can  be  found  in 
any  commercial  article.  The  plant  in  which  the 
various  parts  are  made  and  assembled  into  the 
completed  “voice-writing”  outfit  occupies  eleven 
five-story  concrete  buildings,  exclusive  of  five 
buildings  used  as  chemical  laboratories  for  research 
work.  The  employes  number  some  4,000.  While 
the  Edison  amusement  phonographs,  kinetoscopes 
(moving  picture  machines),  Edison  batteries  and 
numbering  machines  are  produced  in  the  same 
plant,  the  making  of  the  business  machine  is  a 
most  important  feature’of  the  industry.  Its  parts, 
generally  speaking,  come  from  the  same  machinery 
and  skilled  hands  as  those  of  the  amusement 
phonographs. 

A  View  of  the  Plant 

The  electric  power  for  the  entire  plant  is  pro¬ 
duced  in  one  building,  which  contains  engines 
and  generators  equipped  to  furnish  some  3,000 
horse-power.  The  casting  department,  where 
the  base  and  other  parts  are  cast,  occupies  another 
building.  In  the  machinery  department,  where 
over  five  hundred  machines  of  the  most  modern 
type  do  work  that  would  not  be  possible  by  hand, 
the  smaller  parts  of  the  phonographs  are  made. 
Here  screws  are  turned  out  of  a  brass  rod  at  one 


operation.  Holes  are  bored  in  hard  steel  that  do 
not  vary  the  smallest  fraction  of  an  inch  on 
thousands  of  parts  turned  out.  One  large  room  is 
used  for  storing  the  immense  quantity  of  brass  and 
steel  that  goes  into  the  machines.  The  top  floor 
of  the  machinery  building  is  devoted  to  a  sort  of 
job  shop  for  the  plant.  The  japanning,  nickeling 
and  polishing  of  parts  is  given  careful  attention  in 
another  room.  The  reproducers  and  recorders 
are  assembled  and  tested  in  a  department  for  that 
purpose.  A  large  space  is  given  over  to  the 
making  of  reproducing  and  recording  points,  the 
most  vital  part  of  the  whole  machine.  These 
points  are  made  of  sapphire,  and  from  the  rough 
stone  first  given  the  men  who  make  them  to  the 
finished  points,  they  pass  through  twelve  distinct 
operations,  each  one  of  which  is  done  under  a 
powerful  microscope.  Diamond  dust  is  used  for 
grinding  the  sapphires,  and  the  utmost  care  has  to 
be  used  in  handling  them. 

When  ready  for  assembling,  the  different  parts 
of  all  types  of  phonographs  made  are  all  sent  to  a 
stock  room,  where  they  are  tested.  They  are  then 
handed  out  to  the  men  who  do  the  assembling. 
One  large  light  room  is  given  over  to  this.  Before 
the  machine  is  ready  for  the  final  testing  it  has 
passed  through  several  hundred  hands,  the  work 
of  each  man  in  the  assembling  departments  being 
tested  before  it  is  passed  along. 


The  assembling  of  the  business  phonograph  is 
done  in  a  separate  room.  After  the  final  tests  of 
the  mechanism  have  been  made  it  is  equipped 
with  an  electric  or  spring  motor  and  sent  to  the 
special  stock  room,  from  which  it  is  shipped.  In 
this  room  a  complete  stock  of  all  parts  of  the  busi¬ 
ness  machine  is  held. 

Making  the  Cylinders 

The  commercial  cylinders  are  longer  than 
those  for  the  amusement  machine,  being  made 
for  eight  minutes  dictation.  As  they  are  blanks 
they  are  made  by  a  different  process.  They  are 
moulded  in  plain  brass  cylinders,  and  the  composi¬ 


tion  is  poured  in  by  hand.  When  taken  out  of 
the  cylinder  they  are  allowed  to  stand  for  two 
weeks  before  being  touched.  The  bore  is  reamed, 
ends  trimmed  and  then  the  record  is  shaved  by  a 
machine  adjusted  to  take  an  exact  amount  off  each 
blank.  An  inspection  is  made  for  flaws.  It  is 
then  shaved  ready  for  use  and  after  a  final  inspec¬ 
tion  boxed  and  sent  to  the  stock  room.  Defective 
blanks  are  remoulded. 

The  cabinets  in  which  phonographs  are  sold 
are  made  in  a  building  which  would  be  considered 
a  good  size  for  an  exclusive  woodworking  factory. 
They  are  of  standard  finish  quartered  oak  and 
made  from  raw  materials.  The  bottom,  sides  and 
top  are  cut  exact  size  and  finished  separately,  then 
run  through  glue  and  put  in  moulds  until  set. 
When  joined  the  pieces  are  smoothed  off,  dipped 
in  filler,  thoroughly  shellacked  and  varnished  and 
the  words  Edison  Business  Phonograph  stamped 
on  by  a  process  of  decalcomania.  After  a  final 
coat  of  varnish,  oiling  and  polishing  the  cabinets 
are  adjusted  with  hinges  and  locks  and  are  ready 
for  market.  All  packing  cases  in  which  machines 
are  boxed  for  shipment  are  also  made  in  the 
cabinet  building. 

The  entire  Edison  plant  is  in  charge  of  P. 
Weber,  general  superintendent,  and  he  is  ably 
assisted  by  E.  L.  Aiken. 


The  Edison  Dictation  Pad. 


Handling  the  Product 

To  handle  the  product  of  such  an  immense 
plant  as  that  operated  by  the  Edison  Business 
Phonograph  Co.  it  is  manifest  that  there  must  be 
an  executive  and  sale  organization  above  the 
ordinary.  One  entire  building  at  the  factory  is 
utilized  for  the  administrative  force  and  a  fine  five- 
story  building  at  Fifth  avenue  and  Eighth  street, 
New  York,  is  maintained  for  the  selling  organiza¬ 
tion. 

Frank  L.  Dyer  is  president  of  the  company, 
C.  H.  Wilson  is  general  manager,  Wm.  Pelzer 
vice  president,  Alphonse  Westee  secretary  and 
treasurer,  F.  K.  Dolbeer  is  credit  manager,  and 
Nelson  C.  Durand  is  sales  manager  of  the  Edison 
Business  Phonograph  Company. 

The  Phonograph  of  Today 

While  we  have  referred  to  the  first  company 
selling  the  Edison  phonograph  as  being  organized 
in  1878  the  perfected  commercial  machine  as  now 
being  marketed  has  only  been  made  since  1905. 
The  machine  put  out  up  to  that  time  had  only  a 
limited  sale,  as  it  did  not  appeal  to  the  busy  man 
of  affairs  as  an  actual  time  and  money  saver  and 
practical  improvement  over  the  method  of  dic¬ 
tating  to  a  stenographer. 

To-day,  with  all  objections  of  the  old  machine 
eliminated  and  the  improvements  embodied  in  the 
latest  Edison  Business  Phonograph,  it  is  doubtful 
if  there  is  an  office  in  the  country  where  any  con¬ 
siderable  volume  of  correspondence  is  handled 
that  the  “voice  writing”  method  will  not  be 
acknowledged  as  the  most  expeditious,  convenient 
and  economical  obtainable.  It  must  be  used 
intelligently,  however,  and  not  expected  to  per¬ 
form  impossible  feats  or  to  run  indefinitely  without 
oiling  or  any  attention. 

The  Edison  Business  Phonograph  of  the  present 
day,  with  its  reproducer  for  instantly  repeating 
any  words  desired  by  the  dictator  after  an  inter¬ 


ruption,  its  indicator  showing  length  of  letters 
dictated  and  index  of  corrections  or  instructions  to 
the  transcriber,  stands  out  as  one  of  the  actual  office 
necessities  of  successful  business  concerns. 

When  the  operation  of  a  new  Edison  Business 
Phonograph  is  explained  it  would  seem  superfluous 
to  call  attention  to  its  advantages  over  the  old 
method  of  dictating  to  a  stenographer  who  has  to 
write  and  transcribe  the  notes  before  presenting 
them  in  typewritten  form.  Experience  has  proven, 
however,  that  no  matter  how  successful  a  thing 
may  be  or  how  obvious  its  improvement  over  that 
which  it  was  designed  to  replace,  a  lot  of  explain¬ 
ing  and  demonstrating  is  required  to  make  it  “go.” 
The  Edison  Business  Phonograph  is  no  exception 
to  the  general  rule. 

With  the  latest  Edison  “voice  writing”  ma¬ 
chine  a  person  can  dictate  at  leisure  or  as  fast  as 
he  can  talk,  and  get  equally  good  results.  If 
interrupted  while  dictating,  by  a  telephone  mes¬ 
sage,  caller  or  otherwise,  all  he  need  do  is  turn  the 


svvivel-plate  to  the  producer,  hear  what  he  last 
said,  and  proceed.  If  he  desires  correction  of  an 
error,  any  addition  made  to  the  letter,  extra  carbon 
copies  or  anything  not  thought  of  when  he  started 
to  dictate,  lie  can,  by  means  of  the  dictation  index 
slip  supplied  with  Edison  machines,  indicate 
exactly  what  he  wants  and  the  operator  can  follow 
instructions  without  any  loss  of  time.  Moreover, 
a  box  is  supplied  for  each  cylinder  and  the  index 
slip  is  numbered  to  correspond  with  that  on  the 
box.  Corresponding  scales  on  phonograph  and 
index  slips  make  it  extremely  easy  and  simple  to 
make  corrections  instantly.  By  referring  to  the 
index  slip  the  transcriber  can  at  once  ascertain  the 
length  of  a  letter  and  thus  make  allowance  for 
proper  spacing. 

The  Edison  in  Practice 

The  use  of  the  Edison  Business  Phonograph  in 
a  busy  office  means  an  actual  saving  of  fifty  per 
cent  in  stenographers’  time.  Only  the  time  of  the 


t 

i 


f 


dictator  is  used  in  producing  letters,  and  that  of 
the  transcriber  can  be  devoted  wholly  to  repro¬ 
ducing  them  in  typewritten  form.  No  time  is 
wasted  by  the  stenographer  waiting  for  the  dictator 
to  answer  the  telephone,  talk  to  a  caller  or  any  of 
the  dozen  and  one  things  that  come  up  to  interrupt 
him  while  dictating.  Many  users  of  the  phono¬ 
graph  keep  a  machine  at  home  and  dictate  to  it  at 
their  leisure.  This  applies  particularly  to  law¬ 
yers,  judges,  court  stenographers  and  others  who 
find  it  convenient  to  prepare  manuscript  at  home. 
In  this  way  many  trips  to  the  office  can  be  saved, 
as  the  cylinders  can  be  sent  there  by  messenger 
boy.  Oftentimes  when  not  possible  for  a  man  to 
get  to  his  office  he  can  answer  his  correspondence 
at  home  by  use  of  the  phonograph.  This  means 
hundreds  of  dollars  a  year  saved  for  lots  of  men. 

The  new  model  Edison  Business  Phonographs 
are  electrically  operated  by  the  Universal  motor 
for  any  type  of  alternating  or  direct  current.  The 
transcriber  can  start  or  stop  the  machine  instantly 
by  means  of  a  foot-trip  attached  to  the  mechanism. 


A  slight  pressure  of  the  foot  on  this  trip  starts  the 
machine,  and  it  stops  on  the  pressure  being  re¬ 
leased. 

The  introduction  of  the  business  phonograph 
was  first  the  cause  of  considerable  misgiving  on 
the  part  of  stenographers,  who  predicted  reduced 
salaries  or  employment  of  mere  typewriter  oper¬ 
ators.  With  the  new  Edison  machine  there  has 
been  the  reverse  of  this.  They  are  getting  higher 
salaries  for  more  and  better  work,  and  in  many 
cases  are  enjoying  shorter  hours.  The  company 
publishes  a  little  booklet  containing  extracts  from 
the  letters  of  fifty  young  business  men  and  women 
who  have  profited  by  use  of  the  Edison  Phono¬ 
graph  in  their  work  as  stenographers.  Points  of 
advantage  emphasized  in  these  letters  are:  “In¬ 
creased  speed,”  “less  strain  on  eyes,”  “notes 
never  cold,”  “salary  doubled,”  “work  regulated,” 
“not  half  as  tired,”  “improves  the  dictation,” 
“more  accurate  work,”  “leaves  employer  free,”  etc. 


With  stenographers  it  frequently  happens  that 
parts  of  sentences  are  misunderstood  or  the  short¬ 
hand  notes  are  incorrectly  transcribed.  This  is 
impossible  with  the  machine.  Just  what  is  dic¬ 
tated  to  it  is  reproduced.  Nothing  more.  Noth¬ 
ing  less. 

The  plan  of  selling  Edison  Business  Phono¬ 
graphs  through  dealers  has  been  in  operation  only 
a  few  months,  but  Nelson  C.  Durand,  sales  man¬ 
ager  of  the  company,  states  that  it  has  met  with 
unqualified  success  and  will  be  continued  per¬ 
manently.  Until  the  beginning  of  this  year  the 
machines  were  sold  only  through  branch  offices  of 
the  Edison  Company,  located  in  the  principal 
cities.  This  was  done  in  order  to  get  the  machines 
well  established  all  over  the  country  by  ex¬ 
perienced  men  who  were  in  direct  touch  with  the 
head  office  and  could  look  after  repairs  and  diffi¬ 
culties  always  accompanying  the  introduction  of  a 
new  machine.  As  soon  as  the  machine  had  been 
thoroughly  introduced  in  this  way  it  was  decided 


it  could  be  handled  in  a  satisfactory  way  by  office 
appliance  dealers  and  other  merchants.  The 
branch  offices  were  all  closed,  and  the  machines 
are  now  being  distributed  by  dealers. 

When  a  dealer  undertakes  the  sale  of  the  Edison 
Business  Phonograph  he  is  given  every  assistance 
by  the  company.  If  not  too  far  removed  from  the 
routes  of  their  traveling  men  a  specially  trained 
salesman  is  placed  at  his  disposal  until  he  gets  the 
machine  installed  in  a  number  of  offices  and  work¬ 
ing  smoothly. 


8 


The  Edison 

Universal  Electric  Motor 

By  NELSON  C.  DURAND 

SALES  MANAGER 

In  1878,  thirty  years  ago,  the  first  step  was 
taken  to  introduce  the  Edison  Business  Phono¬ 
graph  for  the  dictation  and  transcription  of  corres¬ 
pondence  by  a  company  formed  in  New  York  city. 

The  first  Business  Phonograph  employed  a 
sheet  of  tin  foil,  fastened  around  a  cylinder,  along 
which  the  recording  stylus  was  made  to  pass  by 
turning  a  crank  by  hand.  It  repre¬ 
sented  only  theembyro,  the  germ,  a 
faint  idea  of  the  wonderful  apparatus 
of  the  present  day.  To  plan  and 
build  for  its  perfection  and  adoption 
by  the  business  world,  required  the 
faith,  concentration  and  compre¬ 
hension  of  the  great  mind  that 
created  it. 

Edison  and  the  trained  assistants 
that  his  personality  has  attracted 
about  him  in  these  thirty  years,  have 
never  wavered  from  their  tasks,  and 
all  the  great  improvements  that  ap¬ 
pear  to-day  in  this  branch  of  the 
Phonograph  industry  must  be  at- 
•  tributed  to  the  perseverance  and  in¬ 
genuity  of  the  Edison  organization. 

This  article  is  written  with  the 
hope  that  the  reader  will  appreciate 
the  amazing  progress  of  producing 
the  present  Business  Phonograph  with  its  human¬ 
like  qualities  that  records  dictation,  is  capable  of 
instant  reproduction  and  by  means  of  the  universal 
electric  motor  allows  the  mechanical  amanuensis  to 
be  used  under  every  electrical  condition  in  a  busi¬ 
ness  office  in  which  the  incandescent  light  is  used. 

To  obtain  the  proper  comparison  of  the  pro¬ 
gress  of  the  Business  Phonograph  with  other  office 
appliances^  we  must  separate  the  mechanical  from 
the  electrical.  The  writer  does  not  know  of 
another  office  appliance  like  the  Business  Phono¬ 
graph  that  depends  essentially  for  its  operation 
upon  an  absolute,  uniform  and  relative  motion  of 
its  operating  parts  that  must  be  supplied  from  the 
electric  lighting  circuits,  conveniently  found  in 
the  business  man’s  office.  The  nearest  approach 
to  these  conditions  is  probably  the  electrically 
driven  adding  machine,  but  this  does  not  carry 
with  it  the  requirements  of  noiseless  transmission 
and  constant  operation  during  every  working  hour. 


Now  for  many  years  it  has  been  an  easy  matter 
for  the  manufacturer  to  produce  the  mechanical 
device  that  “talks”  perfectly  with  the  ordinary 
types  of  electric  motors,  that  are  used  by  adding 
machine  companies,  and  others  as  evidenced  by 
the  thousands  of  firms  which  to-day  consider  the 
voice  writing  system  indispensable  in  tbe  conduc¬ 
tion  of  their  correspondence.  The 
real  problem  has  been  the  produc¬ 
tion  of  one  single  universal  type  of 
electric  motor  that  would  make  the 
appliance  interchangeable  on  alii/ 
electric  lighting  circuits,  so  that:  it1'' 
would  take  its  place  as  a  standard 
machine  that  could  be  carried  in 
stock  by  dealers  in  small  quantities, 
and  sold  under  every  condition,  the 
same  as  our  more  favored  friend, 
the  typewriter. 

This  gives  us  the  opportunity  to 
further  explain  to  the  layman  that 
some  cities  employ  a  classof  electrical 
current  known  as  “direct  current” ; 
some  have  “alternating  current”; 
and  the  majority  of  cities  employ 
electrical  circuits  of  several  varieties 
of  these  types. 

Some  business  houses  are  in  the 
direct  current  belt,  and  others  in  the  alternating 
current  belt.  Some  use  direct  current  of  their  own 
and  outside  alternating  current  in  emergencies.  . 

Each  kind  of  current  will  run  a  motor,  but 
each,  up  to  the  present  time,  required  a  different 
kind  of  motor. 

The  new  Edison  universal  motor  brought  out 
for  use  with  the  Edison  Business  Phonograph  will 
run  equally  well  on  all  currents  in  use  throughout 
the  world. 

Whether  the  business  man  uses  the  Phono- 


1 


L 


graph  in  his  office  or  home,  whether  he  uses  it  in 
travelling  from  point  to  point,  whether  he  moves 
from  one  part  of  the  city  to  another,  or  works 
days  on  one  circuit,  or  after  hours  on  another,  the 
universal  motor  gives  the  same  perfect  service. 

In  view  of  these  former  conditions  was  it  any 


wonder  that  the  Business  Phonograph  for  world¬ 
wide  use  has  waited  upon  the  advent  of  the  Edison 
universal  motor? 

The  practical  business  man  will  recognize  the 
present  opportunity  of  a  broad  selling  c-ampaign, 
which  the  new  conditions  make  feasible.  Only 
one  type  of  machine  need  now  be  carried  in  stock 
by  the  dealer,  and  rich  prospects  are  opened  up  in 
new  territory  which  employs  certain  classes  of 
alternating  current  for  which  no  Phonograph 
motor  had  previously  been  devised.  The  former 
difficulty  of  instructing  the  selling  agent  in  the 
technical  operation  of  perhaps  a  dozen  special 
motors  has  been  removed,  and  the  service  to  the 
customer  in  every  territory  will  be  improved. 

A  very  important  detail  in  the  construction  of 
the  Edison  universal  motor  consists  in  its  economy 
in  the  amount  of  electrical  current  which  it  con¬ 
sumes.  This  is  50 %  greater  than  other  types  of 
special  motors,  enabling  the  business  houses  to 
save  a  sufficient  sum  of  money  during  the  life 
time  of  the  machine  to  pay  for  the  original  cost. 

An  examination  of  the  Edison  Business  Phono¬ 
graph  illustrated  on  these  pages  will  give  the 
reader  a  clear  idea  of  its  unique  arrangement. 
Fig.  1  is  a  back  view,  showing  the  electrical  con¬ 
nections  by  which  the  user  attaches  the  Business 
Phonograph  to  any  incandescent  lamp  socket  by 
first  removing  the  lamp,  attaching  the  cord,  and 
then  replacing  the  lamp  in  the  connection  without 
interfering  with  the  light  which  he  needs  for  his 
work.  On  the  back  of  the  cabinet  a  scale  will  be 
noticed  on  which  are  marked  several  of  the  most 
prominent  classes  of  electrical  current  used  today. 


The  user  adapts  his  machine  to  the  local  electrical 
conditions  by  simply  moving  the  sliding  pointer  to 
the  correct  position  which  he  must  first  ascertain 
from  the  proper  authority. 

When  the  Business  Phonograph  is  set  upon 
the  platform  pedestal  these  electrical  changes  for 


the  motor  can  be  conveniently  and  quickly  made 
without  disturbing  the  arrangement  in  any  way. 

Fig-  2  gives  a  general  front  view  of  the  top 
of  the  machine,  which  is  raised  in  the  illustra¬ 
tion  to  expose  the  universal  electric  motor. 
The  motor  is  suspended  from  the  Phonograph 
proper  by  springs,  which  with  its  construction 
makes  it  noiseless  in  its  running.  A  screw  through 
tile  top  plate  provides  for  regulation  in  the  speed 
or  tone  of  the  dictation.  The  motor  case  is  of 
aluminum,  making  the  machineaslightas  possible. 

But  what,  in  addition  to  the  motor,  will  appeal 
most  strongly  to  the  purchaser  of  the  Edison 
Business  Phonograph  is  the  swivel  arm,  holding 
both  a  recorder  and  reproducer.  Many  small 
business  offices  and  professional  men  with  a  limited 
correspondence  can  thus  use  one  machine  for 
both  operations  of  dictating  and  transcribing  by 
passing  the  machine,  after  the  letter  is  dictated,  to 
the  stenographer,  who  simply  turns  to  the  repro¬ 
ducing  tool  to  hear  the  record. 

Thus  the  30th  anniversary  of  the  Edison  Busi¬ 
ness  Phonograph  is  very  fittingly  celebrated  with 
the  introduction  of  this  new  universal  type.  The 
writer  believes  that  this  advancement  in  the  pro¬ 
duction  of  a  universal  electric  motor  will  remain 
a  mark  for  other  manufacturers  to  reach  in  every 
line,  and  though  the  design  of  the  entire  Phono¬ 
graph  may  be  improved  in  detail  it  must  remain 
the  conception  of  the  ideal  mechanical  amanuensis. 


Electrical  Testing  Laboratories 

GENERAL  OFFICE  AND  LABORATORIES 


Sept.  24th,  1908. 


Edison  Business  Phonograph  Company, 
Orange, 


Gentlemen: - 


We  have  tested  the  operation  of  the  "Universal" 
eleotrio  motor  of  Business  Phonograph  Ho.E48,  under  various 
oonditions,  respecting  alternating  or  direot  current,  voltage 
and  frequenoy.  The  motor  was  delivered  to  us  installed  in  a 
phonograph  box  and  driving  its  mandrel.  Before  eaoh  test  the 
indioator  on  the  adjusting  devioe  on  the  baok  of  the  box  was  set 


to  the  marked  point  corresponding  to  the  conditions  of  operation 
The  results  of  the  aleotrioal  and  meohanioal  measure¬ 
ments  are  given  in  the  following  table: 


Current, 


Direot 
Alternating,  < 


60- 

40- 

26- 


Volts. 


na.o 

219  .0 
110.0 
217.6 
110.0 
109.0 


Amperes. 


0.199 

0.210 

0.220 

0.222 

0.218 

0.211 


Watts. 


21.9 

46.0 

24.0 

47.6 

23.8 

23.0 


Time  of 
100  Rev. 
Seoonds 


60.7 

69.6 

61.2 


Under  the  widely  varying  conditions  noted  above  no 
failure  of  the  motor  to  operate  satisfactorily  was  observed, 
fours  very  truly, 

ELECTRICAL  TESTING  LABORATORIES , 


C.H.S./P. 


Manager 


The 

Edison  Commercial  System 


Business  Phonograph 


THE  successful  introduction  of  varied  time-saving  devices  in  the  modern 
business  office  during  the  last  five  years  encourages  the  office  man¬ 
ager  to  recognize  every  appliance  that  promises  greater  convenience, 
economy  or  dispatch  of  the  day’s  work.  The  Edison  Business  Phonograph 
stands  preeminently  alone  in  these  accomplishments.  Where  many  devices 
are  saving  minutes  and  pennies  for  the  business  house,  voice  writing  is  saving 
days  and  dollars — not  alone  for  one  class  of  workers,  but  for  the  combined 
army  of  high  salaried  heads  and  routine  assistants  that  arc  employed  in  the 
world’s  business  correspondence. 

Many  have  wondered  that  a  world  wide  application  of  voice  writing  to 
correspondence  has  not  been  effected  ■  more  quickly,  but  an  explanation  of  this 
is  found  in  the  development  and  extension  of  new  systems  of  electric  lighting 
into  fully  90%  of  the  territory  of  the  world,  for  which  no  suitable  electric 
phonograph  motor  was  provided  until  the  recent  invention  of  the  Edison 
Universal  Motor  (described  on  pages  4  and  5)  which  makes  the  Business 
Phonograph  now  as  practical  as  the  typewriter  in  all  localities. 

The  Office  Manager  who  reads  the  following  pages  should  keep  in  mind 


Universal  Service  for  all  Electric  Power  and  Office  Conditions 


;raph  ,  for  every  convenience  has 
:ntal  voicewriting  machine  to  make 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Edison  Manufacturing  Company 

"Battery  Facts. . .  for  Gas  Engine  Manufacturers."  1899. 

"Edison  Primary  Batteries  and  Battery  Fan  Outfits."  Form  128. 1902. 

"Edison  Primary  Batteries."  Form  280.  1906. 

"Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes."  Form  320. 1907. 

"The  Bulletin  of  Edison  Films  for  the  Week  Ending  February  20, 1909." 
Form  418. 1909. 

"Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes."  Form  470. 1910. 


BATTERY 
FACTS . 


FOR  GAS  ...  . . 

ENGINE  MANUFACTURERS 


MARK 


EDISON  MFG.  COMPANY 

Factory:  Orange,  New  Jersey 
Office  and  Salesroom:  135  Fifth  Ave¬ 
nue,  corner  of  20th  Street,  New  York 


£berc  arc  $ix  good  reasons 

WHY  THE 


Edison-Lalande  Batteries 


COMMEND  THEMSELVES  TO  GAS 
ENGINE  MANUFACTURERS  .A  J 

W  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES  develop  a  heavy,  constant  current-con- 
»  tinuously — no  attention  necessary  until  the  entire  charge  is  exhausted 

^  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES  do  not  waste  while  idle 

3  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES  are  simple  in  construction,  easy  to  set  up, 
easy  to  renew 

4  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES  are  absolutely  free  from  all  noxious  fumes 
or  chemical  deposits.  No  creeping  or  crystalizalion  over  tops  of  jars 

^  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES  will  not  freeze 

6  For  portable  and  marine  gas  engines,  the  EDISON-LALANDE  BATTERIES 
are  made  with  liquid-tight  covers,  and  as  the  containing  vessels  of  these  types 
are  made  of  enameled  steel,  they  will  stand  any  amount  of  hard  usage 


£b«  largest 


GAS  AND  GASOLINE  ENGINE 
MANUFACTURERS  IN  THE 
COUNTRY  ARE  NOW  USING 


Edison-Lalande  Batteries 


jure  Voji  Ulitb  Us? 


READ  SOME  OF,  OUR  TESTIMONIALS 


Description 

The  element  employed  in  the  various  types  of  the  EDISON- 
LALANDE  BATTERIES  described  in  this  pamphlet  are  the 
following 


ZINC,  forming  the  negative  pole 

BLACK  OXIDE  OF  COPPER,  the  positive  pole 

CAUSTIC  POTASH  SOLUTION 

PARAFFINE  OIL  is  poured  on  the  top  of  the  solution,  thus  avoiding  both 
evaporation  and  creeping 


Simplicity 

The  greatest  attenllon  has  been  given  to  simplifying  the  con¬ 
struction  of  these  batteries,  in  order  that  their  management 
may  be  easily  accomplished  and  readily  understood  by  the 
general  public,  unfamiliar  with  the  use  of  batteries.  Complete 
directions  with  illustrated  diagrams,  showing  exactly  how  to 
set  up  and  operate,  accompany  each  battery 


€di$on=Calamk  Batteries 

FOR  STATIONARY  ENGINES 

TYPE  “BB”  CELL 


Slot  Machine  and  Small  Gas  Engine  Model 


Capacity,  (00  Ampere  Hours 
Price  Complete  Cell,  with  Porcelain  Jar,  $1.50 
PRICE  OF  RENEWAL  PARTS 

1  ZinfTrMate.'icapaclty^t^iarge)1,  C'k"SC'>’ .  $  1=5 

i  Can  Caustic  Potash  (capacity,  i  charge),  .  ’  .  .  .15 

Bottle  Heavy  Paraffine  Oil  (t  charge) . .05 

Total . $0.65 

■  V). 


fdisotiCalatule  Batteries 

^  FOR  STATIONARY  ENGINES 

TYPE  “Q”  CELL 


Small  Gas  Engine  Model 


She  over  all.  5  i".  Jar  only,  sK*7in. 

Capacity,  150  Ampere-Hours 
Price  of  Cell,  Complete  with  Porcelain  Jars,  $2,00 


PRICE  OF  RENEWAL  PARTS 

2  Zinc  Plates  (capacity,  I  charge),  I2c.  each,  .  . 

i  Copper  Oxide  Plate  (capacity,  i  charge),  y. 

I  Can,  i  charge  Caustic  Potash, 


edi$on=Calaitde  Batteries 

FOR  MARINE  AND  PORTABLE  ENGINES. 

TYPE  “ZM  CELL 

Small  Marine  and  Traction  Gas  Engine  Model 
with  Liquid-Tight  Steel  Enameled  Jar 


Sire  over  all,  4j£x6Jf  i»-  Jar  only,  4**6  in. 

Capacity,  100  Ampere-Hours 
Price,  Complete,  -  -  -  $1.75 

PRICE  OF  RENEWAL  PARTS 


few  suggestions 

FOR  STATIONARY 
GAS  ENGINE  WORK 
use  "R”  rather  than  “  Q  ”  cells  if  you- have  the  space, 
for  these  reasons 

The  internal  resistance  of  “  R  "  cells  is  less  than  “  Q  ”i  consequently 
the  available  current  is  greater.  5  ••  R  ”  cells  will  replace  6  of  “Q  ’’ 
Also  "  R”  cells  have  double  the  life  of  .“  Q"  cells  i  consequently 
they  last  twice  as  long  and  cost  only  slightly  more 
The  "  BB”  cell  is  the  smallest  size  suitable  for  stationary  work,  and 
has  two-thirds  the  life  of  the  Q.”  7  cells  ••  BB  ”  will  replace  6  of 
“  Q"  or  5  of  “  R.” 

IT  IS  CUSTOMARY  TO  USE  about  4  or  5  “R"  cells,  or  5 
or  6  "  Q  ”  cells  or  6  or  7“BB”  cells  for  .  stationary  gas  engine 

FOR  PORTABLE  o» 

GAS  ENGINE  WORK 

use  “  V  ”  rather  than  "  Z  ”  cells  for  reasons  mentioned  above. 

The  life  of  V  ”  cells  is  SO  per  cent  greater  than  Z  ” 

For  portable  engines  use  5  or  6  "V"  cells,  or  6  to  8  "1"  cells, 
The  ••  AA  ”  is  same  size  as  <•  R,”  and  lasts  twice  as  long  as  ••  V.”  • 
The  internal  resistance  of  "  AA  ”  cells,  is  less  than  ••  Vi”  consequently 
the  available  current  is  greater,  5  “A”  aa  will  replace  6  of“*  V.”  ' 
Use  Edison  SparK  Coils  with  these  batttfips,  See  page  2f, 


Tt  is  poor  economy  to  use 
Cheap  Spark  Coils. — 

EDISON  SPARK  COIL  FOR  GAS  ENGINE  WORK 


The  Principal  Points  in  Favor  of  the 

EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERY 


FORMERLY  KNOWN  AS  THE  EDISON'LALANDE  BATTERY 

1st*  High  and  constant  available  electromotive  force. 

2d.  No  local  action,  and  therefore  no  loss  of  energy,  while  the 
cell  is  idle— the  chemical  action  in  cell  is  less  than  one  per  cent,  per 
month. 

3d*  Extremely  low  internal  resistance. 

4th.  Heavy  current  delivery,  absolutely  constant. 

5th.  Cheap  materials,  easily  obtained. 

6th.  No  attention  or  inspection  required,  until  all  the  energy  of 
its  elements  is  exhausted. 

7th.  Convenience  of.  form,  and  freedom  from  noxious  fumes  or 
chemical  deposits.  No  creeping. 

8th.  No  polarization. 

9th.  Will  not  freeze  at  lowest  temperature. 

10th.  The  Edison  Primary  Battery  is  now  made  in  nine  different 
types,  each  one  of  which  is  especially  designed  for  the  kind  of  work 
named.  (Sec  page  15.) 

Particular  attention  is  directed  to  the  Edison  Primary 
cells ,  types  Z,  V  and  A  A,  illustrated  on  pages  2j,  24 
and  2s,  as  these  models  have  steel  enameled  Jars,  with 
liquid-tight  covers,  and  are  especially  suitable  for  use  with 
portable  gas  engines,  including  marine  and  traction 
engines,  also  slot  machines,  etc,,  etc.  All  these  types  are 
strongly  and  well  made,'  and  will  stand  any  amount  . 

0/  hard  usage.  They  arc  also  well  adapted  for 
PORTABLE  phonograph  batteries,  especially  type  V. 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 


COPPER  OXIDE  PLATES 

The  amount  of  copper  oxide  used  in  each  cell  is  so  calculated  that  it 
will  be  entirely  reduced  to  metallic  copper  when  the  zincs  arc  consumed 
and  the  solution  is  exhausted.  * 

TO  ASCERTAIN  IF  THE  OXIDE  PLATES  ARE  EX¬ 
HAUSTED:  Pick  into  the  body  of  the  oxide  plates  with  a  sharp  pointed 
knife.  If  they  are  red  throughout  the  entire  mass,  they  are  completely 
exhausted  and  need  renewing.  If,  on  the  contrary,  there  is  a  layer  of 
black  in  the  interior  of  the  plates,  there  is  still  some  life  left,  tile 
amount  being  dependent  entirely  upon  the  thickness  of  the  layer  of  black 
oxide  still  left. 


IT  IS  VERY  POOR  ECONOMY  TO  USE  EXHAUSTED 
OXIDE  PLATES  OVER  AGAIN,  as  the  battery  will  then  polarize 


TABLE  SHOWING  RELATION  BETWEEN 
OLD  AND  NEW  MODELS 


ADVICE  AS  TO  WHICH  TYPE  OF  CELL  TO  USE 
ON  VARIOUS  LINES  OF  WORK 


re  have  discontinued  making  Edison  Primary  cells,  type  “E,”  “G,” 
and  “P,”  and  have  substituted  newer  models  specified  below,  and 
ted  on  pages  17  to  25.  We  still  keep  on  hand  Renewal  Parts  for 
earlier  types  above  referred  to,  so  that  customers  having  these  cells 
•vice  will  not  be  inconvenienced. 

Old  type  E  is  now  represented  by  new  type  Q 

“  G  . RR 

“  K  .  S 

“  P  "  “  “  “  \V 

lie  only  change  in  these  cells  is  that  the  zincs  in  the  new  types  ore 
1  to  a  porcelain  knob  on  tile  cover,  and  consequently  have  a  hole  in 
eck  for  the  bolt  to  pass  through,  instead  of  being  made  with  a  hook, 
early  models.  The  oxide  plates,  caustic  soda  and  oil,  will  do  for  the 
ind  old  types  equally  well. 


FOLLOWING  LIST  WILL  BE  OF  SERVICE  TO  DEALERS  CARRYING 
A  LINE  OF  OUR  BATTERIES  ON  HAND 
c  plates  for  Z  and  BB  cells  arc  the  same  size 

"  E,  K,  Q,  S,  SS  and  V  cells 

G,  P,  RR,  \V  and  AA  “ 


:ic  Sodn  cans  for  Z  and  BB 
"  E,  Q  and  V 

"  G,  RR,  K,  S,  SS  and  AA 

"  P  and  W 

:s  of  Oil  for  Z  and  BB 

**  E,  K,  Q,  S  and  V 


Each  type  of  cell  hits  been  constructed  to  fill  special  requirements  of 

the  electrical  profession.  Thus  we  recommend  their  use  as  follows : 

Type  BB.  for  Slot  Machines,  Gas  Engines  and  Annunciators. 

Type  Q.  for  Gas  Engines,  Small  Fan  Motors,  Spark  Coils,  Large  Annun¬ 
ciators,  Burglar  Alarms  and  Slot  Machines. 

Type  RR.  for  Gas  Engines,  Railroad  Crossing  Signals,  Fan  Motors,  Pho¬ 
nographs,  District  Telegraph,  Fire  Alarm  Telegraph,  Local 
and  Main  Line  Batteries,  Turntable  Motors,  Electro¬ 
plating  and  Slot  Machines. 

Type  S.  for  Fan  Motors,  Phonographs,  Electro-plating,  Chemical 
Analysis,  Miniature  Lamps,  Sewing  Machines,  and  X-Ray 
Coils. 

Type  SS.  for  Railroad  Semaphore  Signals. 

Type  Z.  (Liquid-Tight)  for  Marine  and  Traction  Gas  and  Gasoline 
Engines,  Slot  Machines  and  Portable  Battery  for  Phono¬ 
graphs.  (Sec  page  23). 

Type  V.  (LiquidsTight)  for  Marine  and  Traction  Gas  and  Gasolene 
Engines,  Slot  Machines  and  Portable  Battery  for  Phono¬ 
graphs.  (Sec  page  24). 

Type  AA.  (Liquid-Tight)  for  Marine  and  Traction  Gas  and  Gasolene 


FOR  STATIONARY  GAS  ENGINE  WORK 


Use  “  RR”  rather  than  “Q”  cells,  if  you  have  tlic  space,  for  these 


The  internal  resistance  of  “RR”  cells  is  less  than  “Q,”  consequently 
the  available  current  is  greater.  5  “ RR”  cells  will  replace  G  of  “Q" 
Also  “RR”  cells  have  double  the  life  of  “Q”  cells;  they  last  twice  as  long 
.and  cost  only  slightly  more.  The  “BB”  cell  is  the  smallest  size  suitable 
for  stationary  work,  and  has  two-thirds  the  life  of  tlic  “Q.”  7  cells 

“BB”  will  replace  G  of  “Q”  or  5  of  “RR.”  It  is  customary  to  use  about 
4  or  5  “RR”  cells,  or  5  or  6  “Q”  cells,  or  G  or  7  “BB”cclls  for  station¬ 
ary  gas  engine  work. 

FOR  PORTABLE  GAS  ENGINE  WORK 

Use  “V’’  rather  than  “Z”  cells  for  reasons  mentioned  above. 

The  life  of  “V”  is  50  per  cent,  greater  than  “Z”  cells. 

For  portable  engines  use  5  or  G  “V”  cells,  or  6  to  8  “Z”  cells. 

The  "AA”  is  same  size  as  "RR,”  and  lasts  twice  as  long  as  "V.” 

The  internal  resistance  of  "AA”  cells  is  less  than  “V,”  consequently 
the  available  current  is  greater. 

6  “AA”  will  replace  6  of  "V.” 

Use  Edison  Spark  Coils  with  these  batteries.  (Sec  page  27). 

TABLE  SHOWING  WEIGHTS  OF  VARIOUS  TYPES 
EDISON  PRIMARY  CELLS 


ALL  PRICES  SUBJECT  TO  CHANGE  WITHOUT  NOTICE 


Price  List 

EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 

TYPE  “BB”  CELL 

FOR  STATIONARY  ENGINES 

SLOT  MACHINE  AND  SMALL  GAS  ENGINE  MODEL 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 

TYPE  “  Q  ”  CELL 

SMALL  FAN  MOTOR  AND  GAS  ENGINE  MODEL 

CAPACITY,  150  AMPERE-HOURS 

COMPLETE  CELL,  WITH  $2.20 
PORCELAIN  JAR,  Price  **  * — : 

PRICE  OF  COMPLETE  RENEWAL 

FOR  ABOVE .  $  .82 

RENEWAL  PARTS  ITEMIZED  BELOW 

Two  Zinc  Flutes  (capacity  one  charge), 

14c.  each  ......  -28 

One  Copper  Oxide  Plate  (capacity  one 

charge) .  •31 

Can  containing  one  chnrgc  Cnnstic  Soda  .17 

Bottle  Heavy  Paraffine  Oil,  one  charge  .06 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 

TYPE  “SS”  CELL 


CAPACITY,  300  AMPERE-HOURS 


COMPLETE  CELL,  WITH  <tO  25 
PORCELAIN  JAR,  Price  ■ 

COMPLETE  CELL,  WITH  $3  QQ 
GLASS  JAR,  Price  =  _ 

PRICE  OF  COMPLETE  RENEWAL 

FOR  ABOVE . $1.40 


RENEWAL  PARTS  ITEMIZED  BELOW 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 


LIQUID-TIGHT  STEEL  ENAMELED  JAR 

CAPACITY,  150  AMPERE-HOURS 


COMPLETE  CELL  WITH 
LIQUID-TIGHT  STEEL  EN-  <C9  Cfl 
AMELED  JAR,  .  Price  . 
COMPLETE  CELL  WITH 
PORCELAIN  JAR,  BUT 
WITHOUT  RUBBER  GAS-  <tQ  on 
KET  RING,  .  .  .  Price 

PRICE  OF  COMPLETE  RENEWAL  FOR 

ABOVE . .  $  .89 


RENEWAL  PARTS  ITEMIZED  BELOW 


EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 

TYPE  “A  A”  CELL 


LARGE  LAUNCH  AND  TRACTION  GAS  ENGINE  MODEL 

LIQUID-TIGHT  STEEL  ENAMELED  JAR 

CAPACITY,  300  AMPERE-HOURS 


COMPLETE  CELL,  WITH 
LIQUID-TIGHT  STEEL  EN-  cn 
AMELED  JAR,  Price 

COMPLETE  CELL,  WITH 
PORCELAIN  JAR,  BUT 
WITHOUT  RUBBER  GAS-  <tQ  Of) 
KET  RING,  .  .  Price  U 

PRICE  OF  COMPLETE  RENEWAL 


IS -J2 


Edison  9- in.  Suspension 
Battery  Fan  Motor  Outfit 


1902  Model 


General  Directions  for  Charging 
EDISON  PRIMARY  BATTERIES 


When  it  is  practicable,  always  allow  the  solution  to  cool  before 
setting  up  the  Battery.  Remove  any  scum  from  the  surface  of  the 
solution  before  pouring  on  the  oil.  Stir  the  solution  frequently  while  the 
caustic  soda  is  dissolving. 

It  is  most  important  that  the  oxide  plates  should  be  entirely  sub¬ 
merged  in  the  Caustic  Soda  solution,  so  that  the  top  edge  of  the  oxide 
plates  should  be  at  least  one  inch  below  the  layer  of  oil. 

It  is  also  of  vital  importance  that  the  oil  should  not  be  omitted. 


Edison 

Primary  Batteries 


Edison  Spark  Coil 


EDISON  MANUFACTURING  CO. 


Prices  of  Permanent  Parts 


rclain  Jars,  Type  "BB"  .  .  .  $c 

rclain  Jars,  Types  "Q"  and  "V" 
relain  Jars,  Types  "R,"  "RR"  and  “AA" 
relain  Jars,  Type  "S"  . 
relain  Jars,  Type  "SS" 
olain  Jars,  Type  "W”  , 

1  Enameled  Jar,  Type  "AA"  .  i 

Enameled  Jar,  Type  "V" 

Enameled  Jar,  Type  "Z”  . 
elain  Covers,  Types  "Z"  and  "BB"  . 
elain  Covers.  Types  "Q,"  "S,"  "V"  and  "  W" 


EDISON  PROJECTING 
KINETOSCOPE 

EXHIBITION  MODEL,  IMPROVED  T 
AND  FILM  MAGAZINES. 


MOTION  PICTURE  UNIVERSAL 
ADJUSTABLE  OBJECTIVE  LENS 


This  is  a  new  lens  for  motion  picture  work.  .It 
will  project  a  picture  of  any  desired  size  between 

the  location  of  the  machine  or  making  any  change 
in  the  focus  of  the  objective. 


CARRYING  CASES 


a  very  intense  illuminant,  and  for  man> 
found  great  favor  with  stcrcopticon  ex- 
;  a  convenient  clear  and  intense  light  foi 


when  electric  current  is  not  available. 

.  GASO-OXYGEN  GAS-MAKING 
OUTFITS 

The  Gaso-Oxvgen  Light  is  a  powerful  illumin- 
ant  and  one  of  the  best  substitutes  ,for  electric 
light.  It  is  safe,  economical  and  casy&o  operate. 
The  outfit  consists  of  an  oxygen  generating  appa¬ 
ratus,  saturator  and  burner.  The  jet  burns  upon 
a  lime  pencil  and  produces  a  brilliant  light.  Two 
outfits,  designated  No.  27  and  No.  28,  respectively, 
will  be  found  with  a  complete  list  of  parts  for 
each,  together  with  prices,  on  pages  Nos.  38-40. 
DYNAMIC  HIGH  POWEJR  CALCIUM 
LIGHT  BURNER 


PARTS  AND  SUPPLIES 

ISON  EXHIBITION  MODEL  PROJECTING 


The  Bulletin  of 

EDISON 

FILMS 

For  ■  Week,  Ending 
February  20,  1909 


MANUFACTURING  COMPANY 


A  Daughter  of  the  Sun  The  Uplifting  of  Mr.  Barker 


EDISON 

KINETOSCOPES 


Ma 


Edison  Projecting 
Kinetoscopes 


Made  by 

EDISON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY 
Orange,  New  Jersey 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


•TERMS 

Cash  with  order,  or  C.  O.  D.  upon  receipt  of  twenty-five  per  cent,  of 
the  amount  of  the  purchase  to  guarantee  transportation  charges.  Remit  by 
Bank  Draft,  Post  Office  or  Express  Money  Order,  or  Certified  Check. 

Deliveries  F.  O.  B.  at  point  of  shipment.  No  charge  for  boxing  or 
cartage. 

When  ordering  state  whether  shipment  is  to  be  made  by  freight  or  ex¬ 
press,  and  give  route  in  either  case.  Freight  shipments  take  from  three  to  four 
times  as  long  to  reach  destination  as  express  shipments,  but  the  latter  cost 
from  three  to  five  times  more. 

Use  catalog  numbers  for  mail  orders,  use  code  words  for  telegraphic 
orders,  and  spell  the  code  words  exactly  as  printed. 

Edison  Projecting  Kinctoscopcs  arc  sold,  without  territorial  restrictions. 
We  do  not  lease  or  rent  machines.  We  do  not  ship  machines  on  approval. 
We  do  not  deal  in  second-hand  machines,  or  take  old  machines  in  exchange 
or  trade. 

CAUTION 

Edison  Kinctoscopcs,  Projecting  Kinctoscopes  and  Films  arc  covered  by 
U.  S.  Patents  No.  493.2+6,  March  14,  1893;  No.  589,168,  August  31,  1897 
(re-issued  September  30,  1902,  No.  12,037  and  12,038,  and  January  12, 
190+,  No.  12,192) ;  No.  688,648  and  No.  688,649,  December  10,  1901,  and 
No.  714,845,  December  2,  1902.  The  public  is  warned  against  purchasing  or 
exhibiting  infringing  apparatus. 


Introduction 

Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes,  as  now  highly  devel¬ 
oped,  represent  the  motion  picture  art  at  its  best. 

In  the  thirteen  years  that  Edison  Projecting  Kinetoscopes 
have  been  before  the  public  they  have  always  enjoyed  the 

reputation  of  combining  safety,  reliability,  durability  and  all 

other  essential  features  of  a  perfect  motion  picture  machine. 
They  have  at  all  times  kept  pace  with  the  demands  of  the 
motion  picture  business.  Numerous  important  improve¬ 
ments  have  been  made  from,  time  to  time,  while  the  older 

tried  and  proven  features  have  been  retained.  They  are  now 

made  in  two  styles:  Underwriters’  Model  (Type  “B”) 
Projecting  Kinetoscopes,  Improved  Exhibition  Model  Pro¬ 
jecting  Kinetoscope. 

Each  is  a  perfect  motion  picture  machine  in  every 
respect,  although  differing  in  some  of  the  details  of  con¬ 
struction.  Both  are  adapted  for  Edison  standard  films,  as  well 
as  for  the  films  of  other  licensed  manufacturers.  The 
mechanism  of  each  is  so  simple  as  to  be  easily  understood 
by  anyone  of  ordinary  intelligence.  Both  are  made  with 
the  one-pin  movement. 

The  advantages  derived  from  the  use  of  Edison  machines 
are:  Durability,  compactness,  portability,  *  simplicity  of 
operation,  accuracy,  interchangeability  of  parts  and  the  pro¬ 
jection  of  steady  and  flickerless  pictures. 

A  general  description  of  both  models  is  arranged  in  this 
catalog  to  briefly  and  clearly  demonstrate  their  advantageous 
features. 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


Take-Up  Attachment 


The  Take-up  Attachment  automatically  winds  up  the  film  after  it  has  been  exhibited 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


The  question  of  Rheostats  is  one  about  which  there  has  been  r 
diversity  of  opinion,  due  principally  to  a  lack  of  knowledge  of  re 
not  practical  to  make  what  might  be  termed  a  "Universal  Rheostat" 

Direct  Current  circuits  of  100-125  volts  will  give  perfectly  satisf; 
ordinary  conditions  in  the  hands  of  an  intelligent  operator.  To  get 

For  Direct  Current  circuits  of  100-125  volts  the  Underwriters’  P 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 
Improved  Film  Rewinder 


One-Pin  Movement  Alterations 

Exhibition  Model  Two-Pin  Movement  Mechanisms  and  Underwriters’  Model  Two- 
Pin  Movement  Mechanisms  can  be  changed  to  One-Pin  Movement  Mechanisms  at  a  cost 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


Lenses 

All  lenses  furnished  by  us  are  of  the  highest  quality  and  specially  adapted  for  the 
work  intended.  Motion  Picture  Lenses  Nos.  4,  5  and  i  project  the  same  size  pictures 
respectively  as  I,  2  and  3,  but  are  of  much  better  quality,  in  fact  are  the  highest  grade 


Table  of  Projection 


|  Project  a  picture  3  ft.  wide  for  every  thirteen  feet  of  distance. 
1  Project  a  picture  3  ft.  wide  for  every  nineteen  feet  of  distance. 


Stereo.  Lenses;  while  the  Exhibition  Model  has  the  No.  2  and  2A  Lenses. 


Special  Lenses 


Universal 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


THE  SATURATOR 

The  Saturator  is  attached  to  the  side  of  the  generator,  so*as  to  be  in  a  convenient 
position  when  the  apparatus  is  in  use,  although  it  may  be  readily  detached  for  recharging  . 
or  for  transportation. 

4  **  *Je  Saturator  consists  of  a  polished,  nickel-plated  brass  cylinder  forming  a  chamber 
which  is  filled  with  absorbent  material  which  is  saturated  with  sulphuric  ether  or  88% 
gasoline. 

When  the  apparatus  is  in  use  oxygen  flows  through  an  ingenious  arrangement  of 
coils  within  the  Saturator  chamber,  passes  through  a  condensing  chamber  at  the  bottom 
of  the  Saturator  and  thence  returns  to  a  double  valve  controlled  by  two  thumb  screws. 
One  of  these  thumb  screws  permits  a  limited  amount  of  oxygen  to  pass  into  the  bottom 
of  the  saturation  chamber  and  causes  the  vaporization  of  the  ether,  which  is  conducted 
by  a  hose,  attached  to  the  top  of  the  Saturator,  to  the  calcium  light  jet.  The  other  thumb 
screw  controls  the  flow  of  pure  oxygen  (freed  from  water  vapor  by  passing  through  the 
coils  within  the  saturator)  which  is  conducted  by  another  tube  to  the  other  inlet  to  the 
calcium  light  jet. 

The  Saturator  holds  approximately  1  lb.  of  sulphuric  ether,  which  is  sufficient  for 
the  longest  entertainment  using  a  double  lantern. 

The  upper  end  of  the  Saturator  is  provided  with  a  large  removable  cap  which 
remove*  th  jttchanBlng  of  the  PacklnS  within  the  Saturator,  should  it  be  desired  to 

For  those  unfamiliar  with  the  use  of  ether  saturators  it  may  be  well  to  state  that 
the  ether  vapor  takes  the  place  of  the  hydrogen  gas  ordinarily  used.  In  other  respects 
te  operation  is  identical  with  that  of  the  operation  of  oxygen  and  hydrogen  cylinders. 
This  Saturator  is  more  perfect  in  design  and  operation  than  any  which  has  heretofore 
been  put  on  the  market. 


e  improvements  embodied  in 


19,28  Edl,on  0x>’S'"  Generator  and  Saturator  (without  burner  or  chemicals) . .  j 


EDISON  PROJECTING  KINETOSCOPES 


High  Power  Calcium  Light  Burner 

This  lime  light  burner  has  the  highest  efficiency  of  any  calcium  light  burner  on  the 
market,  and  is  particularly  well  adapted  for  the  projection  of  motion  pictures.  The  best 
calcium  light  is  not  as  powerful  as  the  electric  arc,  and  any  feature  that  adds  to  the 
candle  power  of  a  lime  light  burner  is  highly  desirable. 

The  mixing  chamber  of  this  burner  is  constructed  along  the  best  scientific  lines. 
The  gases  mix  thoroughly  before  they  reach  the  tip  of  the  burner.  Larger  bore  goose¬ 
necks  are  furnished  extra  on  special  order. 

When  exhibitors  desire  the  highest  degree  of  illumination,  the  large  bore  is  used 


with  a  lime  cylinder  1J4  inches  in  diameter.  The  lime  cup  of  the  Burner  is  of  the 
standard  size  to  take  inch  or  %  inch  limes;  limes  V/a,  inches  in  diameter  are  reduced 
at  the  bottom  to  fit  this  lime  cup. 

Actual  photometric  tests  demonstrate  that  this  Burner  produces  1,100  candle-power 
with  1  %  inch  limes.  Ordinary  lime  light  burners  produce  only  600  candle-power  with 


Cat.  No. 

19092  Hold  erTost  °.  '"I"1. .  .’.V.'. .  .'•••• 

18463  Extra  Goose-necks  1/12  inch  bore,  each. . 

18463A Extra  Goose-necks  1/16  inch  bore,  each...... 


Oxone 

HARD  AND  COMPACT!  WILL  NOT  CRUMBLE;  UNIFORM  SUPPLY  OF 
OXYGEN;  W/,%  PURE  GAS. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Edison  Ore  Milling  Syndicate,  Ltd. 

"The  Dunderland  Iron-Ore  Deposits  and  Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison's  Process " 
Ca.  1902. 


M>  thNcj  ' 

<w  4U  £-  2  ra o  jy  A/^sr^ty 

0  /96  V- /o- 2? 

77„>  y«Jc«s*  *»/?  ' 

p«perS  Se„J.  £  &/,*>.:,  */,/£  2?j  /9/a 

by  &  G'oyc/er^  /7ar£s  ■ 

TLhc 

Dijntverlanb  3ron»©re  Deposits 

•'..  ...anb...  * 

fllbr.  ZEbomas  H.  3Ei>  (son’s' fl^ocess. 


EDISON  ORE  MILLING 

•  .'  SYNDICATE,  LIMITED, 

Amberley  Souse,  '  fe 
;  v  Norfolk  Street, 

Strand,  Lon^n,  W.C. 


The 

Dunderland  Iron  Ore  Deposits 


.  .  .  and  .  .  . 

Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison’s  Process* 


The  Dunderland  Iron  Ore  Deposits  and 
Mr.  Thomas  A.  Edison’s  Process. 


•  There  has  been  for  some  time  a  well-founded  apprehension  that  both  the  nati\e 
and  foreign  sources  from  which  the  iron  and  steel  manufacturers  of  Great  Britain 
draw  their  supplies  of  pure  iron  ore  must  in  comparatively  few  years  become  ex¬ 
hausted.  The  Cumberland  deposits  are  being  worked  out,  and  Spanish  ore,  if  not 
approaching  exhaustion,  is  deteriorating  so  seriously  in  quality  as  to  raise  grave 
doubts  whether  it  will  be  worth  importing  in  the  near  future.  When  it  is  considered 
that  the  British  iron  and  steel  industry  imported  no  less  than  4)087,744  tons  of  ore 
and  112,735  tons  of  pig  iron  in  the  first  nine'months  alone  of  1901,  and:that  the 
continuance  in  work  of  the  great  steel  plants  of  the  country  depends  upon  the 
maintenance  of  this  supply,  both  in  bulk  and  quality,  the  necessity  of  new  sources 
of  supply  is  apparent. 

In  these  circumstances  the  discovery  of  any  new  and  extensive  source  of  supply 
is  necessarily  a  matter  of  the  utmost  importance  to  the  iron  and  steel  industry,  and 
such  a  source  of  supply  has  now  been  rendered  a  practical  possibility  by  the  appli¬ 
cation  of  the  new  Edison  process  to  the  Dunderland  Iron  Mines.  • 

The  Dunderland  deposits  are  situated  on  the  West  Coast  of  Norway,  sixteen 
miles  from  the  port  of  Mo,  on  the  Ranen  Fjord,  which  is  practicable  for  ships  of  large 
draught.  A  thorough  examination  has  been  made  of  one  set  of  deposits  by  means  of 
trenching,  boring,  etc.,  and  it  is  estimated  that  80  million  tons  of  ore  are  shown 
to  be  available  for  open  cast  quarrying.,  In  addition  it  is  confidently,  believed  that 
the  deposits  not.  yet  proved  contain  at  least  a  further  100  million  tons.  There  is 
available  on  the  property  water  power  sufficient  to  run  a  concentrating  plant  many 
times  larger  than  is  contemplated ;  and  freehold  land  amply  sufficient  for  the  con¬ 
struction  of  a  railway  between  the  port  and  the  mines,  and  for  the  necessary  wharves, 
mills,  etc.  The  railway  has  already'been  surveyed  in  detail  and  can  be  rapidly 
and  economically  constructed.  The  climate  is  reported  to  permit  of  work  being 
carried  on  in  all  seasons,  without' serious^  interruption.  Labour  is  cheap  and 
plentiful.,  ■ 

The  Dunderland  ore  fields  have  long  been  known  to  geologists  as  among  the  most 
extensive  in  Europe,  and  the  following  gentlemen  among  others  have  reported  upon 
them Professor  Henry  Louis;  M. A.,  A.R.S.M.  (of  the  Durham  School  of  Mines), 
Dr.  Theodor  Lehmann,  Freiburg  University,  and  Professor  Vogt,  Geologist  to  the 
Norwegian  Government.  • 

The  deposits  have  not  hitherto  been  commercially  worked  for  the  reason  that 
the  ore,  which  averages  40  per  cent,  metallic  iron,  is  not  sufficiently  rich  in  iron  to 
ship  in  a  crude  state  to  British  ports. 


When  this  ore,  however,  is  changed  by  concentration  from  a  40  per  cent,  to  a 
67  per  cent,  ore,  the  value  of  the  Duriderland  Mines  becomes  unique  at  once  on 
account  of  the  abundance  and  friability  of  ore  available,  and  the  natural  features  of 
the  situation.  As  Professor  Henry  Louis,  M.A.,  says:  "The  advantages  presented 
by  this  property — namely,  enormous  quantities  of  low  grade  ore  within  a  short  dis¬ 
tance  of  a  shipping  place,  and  with  ample  water  power  for  all  purposes,  are  most 
marked,  and  are  not  approached  by  any  other  property  in  Europe,  as  far  as  I  know.” 

It  is  proposed  to  erect  in  Dunderland  a  plant  designed  by  Mr.  Edison  to  con¬ 
centrate  a  million  and  a  half  tons  of  this  ore  per  annum.  Mr.  Edison  has  devoted, 
many  years  and  expended  approximately  five  hundred  thousand  pounds  sterling  in 
investigating  the  concentrating  problem  and  experimenting  on  a  large  scale  with  the- 
machinery.  The  Edison  Ore  Milling  Syndicate  Limited,  which  is  the  owner  of  Mr. 
Edison’s  European  patents  amongst  others,  has  devoted  the  last  three  and  a  half: 
years  to  testing  properties  to  which  the  process  should  be  applied,  and  secured  the 
Dunderland  property- as  in  all  respects  the  most  eligible. 

The  process  has  now  been  perfected  and,  by  its  enormous  output  and  low  work¬ 
ing  cost,  makes  a  notable  advance.in  the  science  and  practice  of  winning  and  preparing 
such  ores  for  the  furnace. 

The  process  consists  briefly  in  crushing  the  iron-bearing  rock  to  powder,  magT 
netically  separating,  the  powdered  iron  from  the  rock  dust,  and  moulding  the  powdered- 
iron,  after  mixing  with  a  binding  material,  into  briquettes. 

In  the  course  of  crushing  and  separating,  the  silica  and  phosphorus  are  so  largely 
eliminated  that  the  briquettes  become  pure  ore  of  the  highest  quality  and  value,  con¬ 
taining  on  an  average  65  per  cent,  to  67  per  cent,  metallic  iron. 

Mr.  E.  Windsor  Richards,  ex-President  of  the  Iron  and  Steel  Institute,  and 
Director  of  Bolckow,  Vaughan  and  Co.,  Guest,  Keen  and  Co.,  etc.,  in  his  report, 
says; — "These  analyses  show  that  .  ...  the  ore  has  been  changed  from  an 

impure  condition  to  one  high  in  iron  and  low  in  sulphur  and  phosphorus,  and  made, 
entirely  suitable  for  the  manufacture  of  high-class  steel  by  the  acid  processes." 

.  ^Th e-briquettes,  in  addition  to  being  high  in  iron,  conUin^jlcLahsarb-no-moistiircr 
and-consequeh U  v  eliedTa  L^3ideraEIe-eeonolrRLof~fujel-in-th&--ftHmftce.  The  plant  it- 
is,  proposed  to  erect  will  be  designed  to  produce  750000  tons  of  briquettes  per' 
annum  at  the  outset,  and  this  output  can  be. increased  at  a  comparatively  low  expendi¬ 
ture  upon  additional  plant. 

A  bank  of  magnets  is  now  in  operation  in  London,  and  illustrates  the  process  of  the' 
magnetic  separation  of  both  magnetite  and  specular  hematite. 


THE  PURE  IRON  ORE  SUPPLY. 


Professor  Henry  Louis,  M.A.,  Durham  School  of  Mines,  in  the  course  of  a  report 
the  Dunderland  Ore  Fields,  says 

The  data  on  which  this  report  is  based  were  obtained  during  my  lengthy  examina¬ 
tion  of  the  property  in  the  summer  of  1899,  and  the  results  of  the  prospecting  and 
boring  operations  carried  out,  ...  by  Dr.  Lehmann  in  the  summer  of  1900. 

LOCATION. — Tiie  property  is  situated  near  the  head  of  the  Ranen  Fjord,  on 
the  West  Coast  of  Norway,  almost  upon  the  Arctic  circle.  The  most  important  portion 


lies  along  the  northern  slope  of  the  Dunderland  Valley,  commencing  about  12  miles 
from  the  mouth  of  the  Dunderland  River,  and  extending  eastwards  up  the  river  for 
another  13  miles.  The  Ranen  Fjord  is  navigable  up  to  the  mouth  of  the  river  for 
the  largest  steamers,  and  is  said  to  remain  open  in  all  except  abnormally  severe  winters. 

EXTENT. — ’I’iie  property  comprises  some  560  mineral  concessions,  each  conces¬ 
sion  being  280  metres  along  the  outcrop  of  the  ore,  making  thus  a  total  length  of 
nearly  100  miles  of  mineral  belts;  the  necessary  surface  rights  are  included,  together 
with  the  land  needed  for  railways  and  a  shipping  station,  also  a  very  large  waterfall,  known  * 
as  Renfossen,  together  with  several  smaller  ones. 

ORE  DEPOSITS. — These  form  a  belt  of  mineralised  country  some  13  miles 
long,  consisting  of  beds  of  schist  impregnated  with  layers  and  patches  of  iron  ore. 
These  are  several  parallel  ore-bodies  varying  in  width  up  to  400  feet;  these  ore-bodies 
cannot  be  traced  continuously,  being  cut-  off  in  some  places  by  faults  and  folds  of  the 
strata,  and  buried  in  others  under  glacial  drift.  Only  the  Eastern  10  miles  of  the 
main  mineral  belt  have  been  properly  prospected ;  this  portion  has  been  proved  by 
trenching  and  boring  to  contain  75  million  tons  of  ore  workable  opencast  without 
hoisting,  no  deposit  narrower  than  60  feet  in  width  being  included  in  this  calculation. 
Taking  into  account  the  other  unproved  and  outlying  portions  of  the  property,  it  is 
safe  to  estimate  that  there  are  100  millions  of  tons  of  ore  available.  . 

COMPOSITION  OF  THE  ORE. — An  exhaustive  series  of  tests  has  given  the 
following  as  the  average  composition  of  the  proved  portion  of  the  deposit: — 

Metallic  iron  present  as  magnetite  .  ...  10  per  cent. 

Metallic  iron  present  as  hematite  .  29  per  cent. 


With  reference  to  the  available  water  power,  he  says: — 

There  is  on  the  Dunddrland  River  an  immense  waterfall,  over  100  feet  in  height, 
capable  of  yielding1  much  over  50,000  H.P.,,  so  that  the  mill  can  be  driven  by  this 
cheap  source  of  power,  there  being  also  ample  power  to  work  electrically  the  railways 
connecting  the  mines,  mill,  and  shipping  place,  thus  providing  cheap  transport,  whilst 
the  same  force  can  be  transmitted  to  the  workings  and  employed  for  drilling,  hauling 
the  ore,  and  all  other  purposes  for  which  power  may  be  required. 


And  summing  up  his  observations,  says  generally : — 


e  advantages  presented,  by  this  property — namely,  enormous  quantities  of  low 
>re  within  a  short  distance  of  a  shipping  place,  and  with  ample  water  power 
purposes,  are  most  marked,  and  are  not  approached  by  any  other  property 


silica,  tne  mini  concentrates  average  front  03  to  00 *5 ^  01  metallic  iron,  from  0*020  to  0*02 9% 
of  phosphorus,  about  0*013%  sulphur,  and  about  3  to  4%  of  silica;  or,  in  other  words, 
the  low  grade  (in  tlieir  crude  state  practically  useless)  Dunderland  ores  have  been  changed 
into  a  high-grade  Bessemer  ore,  which,  after  being  brought  into  the  form  of  hard,  compact 
briquettes,  will  prove  in  eveiy  respect  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  furnace,  either  if  it 
be  used  alone  by  itself  or  as  an  admixture  to  other  ores. 

As  in  this  process  of  concentration  it  requires  about  two  tons  of  the  crude  ore  to  make 
one  ton  of  concentrates,  the  quantity  of  ore  represented  in  the  Dunderland  deposits,  as 
far  as  they  can  be  mined  opencast,  is  equivalent  to  about  40  million  tons  of  rich  iron  ore 
briquettes,  which  will  keep  a  concentrating  plant  with  a  capacity  of  5000  tons  of  crude  ore 
(equivalent  to  2500  tons  of  briquettes)  per  day  going  for  more  than  fifty  years.  After  all 
the  upper  portions  of  the  ore  have  been  removed  by  quarrying,  at  least  another  100  million 
tons  cau  be  obtiiued  by  underground  mining. 


After  observations  on  the  Helgeland  and  Fuglstrand  group  of  deposits,  com¬ 
prising  293  mining  concessions,  which  contain  vast  quantities  of  ore,  but  have  not 
yet  been  so  thoroughly  investigated,  Dr  Lehmann  proceeds : — 

As  was  stated  above,  the  most  westerly  deposits  of  the  Dunderland  group  will  be  the 
first  ones  to  be  exploited.  A  proposed  railway  connecting  these  ore-bodies  with  the  sea 
and  the  concentrating  plant  has  been  surveyed,  and  practically  all  the  land  necessary  for 
it  has  been  purchased.  The  concentrating  works  themselves  it  is  intended  to  erect  at 
Storfoshei,  at  a  sina  1  distance  from  the  Mines,  where  sufficient  ground  offering  splendid 
facilities  both  for  building  a  plant  of  any  desired  capacity  and  for  disposing  of  all  the 
refuse  or  *•  tailings  ”  from  the  works  can  be  acquired  at  small  cost. 

Building  stone  of  a  fair  quality  is  found  near  by,  and  as  the  district  is  fairly  wooded, 
a  good  portion  of  the  necessary  timber  cau  be  obtained  ;  but  the  larger  sizes  of  timber,  such 
as  is  required  for  bridges,  trestles,  harbour,  etc.,  will  have  to  be  brought  from  other  parts 
of  Norway.  Plenty  of  good  intelligent  labour  is  available  at  a  low  price,  the  average  wages 
of  a  skilled  miner  or  carpenter  being  3/6  a  day.  A  good  harbour  site  exists  at  Guldsmedvik, 
a  large  tract  of  freehold  land  situated  at  the  Fjord  near  the  mouth  of  the  Dunderland  River, 
and  belonging  to  the  owners  of  the  Miues. 

When  finished,,  the  harbour  can  accommodate  two  or  three  vessels  of  about  6000  tons, 
and  it  is  possible  and  advisable  to  build  the  stockhouses  upon  or  close  to  the  quay,  so  that 
with  proper  loading  arrangements  the  vessels  may  receive  their  cargo  of  ore-briquettes  in 
the  shortest  time  possible. 

A11  excellent  Waterpower ‘has  been  acquired,  together  with  all  the  land  necessary  for 
the  erection  of  a  power  station.  The  falls  are  called  Rcnfosscn,  situated  at  a  point  about  half¬ 
way  between  the  sea  and  the  mines,  and  judging  from  the  reports  of  several  experts,  it  is 
certain  that  they  can  furnish  throughout  the  year  all  the  power  that  would  ever  be  needed 
for  operating  both  works  and  railway . 

Although  the  Mines  are  situated  at  the  border  of  the  Arctic  region,  the  climate  is,  due 
to  the  influences  of  the  Sea  and  Gulf  stream,  not  so  severe  as  to  interfere  with  either  Mines 
or  traffic.  Mining  has  on  aii  enormous  scale  been  successfully  carried  on  for  many  years  at 
the  Sulitjelma  and  Gellivara  Mines,  which  are  sit  mted  much  fur.  her  north  and  inland.  It  is 
true  that  the  Ranenfjord  freezes  occasionally  in  its  upp  r  part,  but  there  is  little  doubt  that 
with  regular  navigation,  it  will  be  possible  to  keep  it  open  at  all  times . 


Mo-i-Rauen,  November  5///, 


THEODOR  LEHMANN, 


. The  area  of  the  iron  ore  deposits  iu  Dunderlandsdalen,  comprising  rich  an 

poorer  ores,  I  have  calculated  to  be  about  600,000  square  metres ;  but  if  one  includes  th 
deposits  of  the  Helgeland  group,  the  total  area  is  not  less  than  one  milliori  of  square  metre 

. *  1  he  quantity  of  ore  in  Dunderland  is  greater  than  at  Gellivara,  and  about  th 

ic  as  at  Kirumavara  Luossavara.  The  more  important  deposits  vary  between  43*5  %  an 


69-5  %  of  in 


Extracts  from  a  Report  made  01 
skjold,  in  1899  : 


Dunderland  Ore  Deposits,  by  Dr.  O.  Norden 


. There  can  be  no  doubt  that  the  iron  ore  deposits  of  Dunderslandsdalcn  ma’ 

be  . classed  among  the  largest  known  upon  earth.  But  it  is  a  fact  that  a  large  portion  of  thes' 
ores  are  of  such  a  quality  that  they  cannot  be  used  directly  ;  should  it,  however,  be  possibli 
that  they  can  be  concentrated  by  magnetic  methods,  it  is  almost  certain  that  these  on 

deposits  will  in  the  near  future  be.  practically  available . 

Tlte  location  of  Renfosscn,  one  of  the  largest  waterpowers  of  Norway,  on  the  road  fron 
to  the  port  of  Mo,  is  of  great  importance  ;  a  railway  can  be  constructed  witliou 


difficulty. 

As  regards  the  depth  to  which  these  deposits  continue,  there  is  at  the  present  time  n< 
certainty,  because  no  borings  have  been  made  ;  but  that  they  continue  to  a  depth  of  severa 
hundreds  of  metres  appears  to  tne  quite  certain,  on  account  of  their  great  geologica 
character,  tlieir  enormous  longitudinal  extent,  and  their  intimate  connection  with  rocks abou 
■  whose  continuation  to  great  depths  there  ca  '  '  ' 


. From  samples  gathered 

ore  contains  about  47  per  cent,  of  metallic 
worked  opencast . 


the  m 


SjOgel,  Marianeiuttd,  August,  1899. 


Extract  from  a  Report  by  Mr.  Walter  Windsor  Richards,  dated  October,  1901, 
on  the  Dunderland  property  : —  ■ 

A  glance  at  the  calculations  will  shew  that  in  the  Urtvand  district  alone  an  estimate  of 
102  million  tons  is  given,  of  which  54  million  can  be  worked  opencast.  In  this  several 
apparently  large  bodies,  as  Naeverness,  are  not  taken  into  account  as  there  are  no  boreholes, 
and  they  dip  into  the  hill.  There  are  also  several  other  smaller  deposits,  which  have  had 
no  work  done  on  them,  which  I  have  left  out,  so  that  these  estimates  are  of  the  most  con- 

When  work  is  started  on  the  Urtvand  deposits,  I  strongly  recommend  that'  prospecting 


Urtvand.  It  is  on  a  plateau  at  an  elevation  of  150  feet  above  the  river ;  it  is  1,500  feet  long 
by  1,000  feet  wide,  and  is  partly  covered  with  timber  which  must  be  removed.  .  The  Ortvand 
lake  is  i£  x  4  mile,  and  is  the  centre  of  all  the  Ortvand  deposits.  At  the  south  end  is  a 
large  cavity  which  is  proposed  to  be  used  as  a  dumping  ground  for  the  tailings  from  the 
concentrates.  This  dumping  ground  is  about  3,000  feet  long  by  800  feet  wide,  and  its 
average  depth  below  tile  plateau  about  100  feet.  The  capacity  would  be  about  240  million 
cubic  feet  Taking  the  specific  gravity  oi  the  tailings  to  be  3,  that  of  the  Ore  being  4,  this 
dumping  ground  would  contain  space  for  the  residue  from  50  million  tons  of  Ore. 


Extracts  from  Reports  on.  Dunderland  Ore  Deposits,  by  A.  Hasselbohm,  M.E.,  in 
.  and  1899  : 

•  Summing  up  the  contents  of  the  above  detailed  descriptions,  it  will  be  seen  that  the 
extension  of  the  Dunderland  iron  ore  deposits,  from  the  western  extremity  of  the  Vestraalid 
district  to  North-Dunderland,  amount  to  not  less  than  15  miles. 

On  an  average  there  arc  three  or  four  parallel  veins,  each  of  them  being  from  20-100 
feet — in  several  cases  so  much  as  400-500  feet  thick;  the  whole  of  the  deposits  covering  a 

surface  of  about  one  million  of  square  metres.  . 

As  the  beds  ot  iron  ore  occur  at  a  sufficient  elevation  to  render  mining  possible  to  a 
depth  of  600-700  feet,  without  being  inconvenienced  by  water,  it  follows,  that  there  exists  in 
Dunderland  an  easily  available  quantity  of  ore  of  not  less  than  200  million  tons  of  cubic 
metres,  or  840  millions  of  metric  tons. 


designed  by  Mr.  Edison.  After  drying  the  ore  is  conveyed  t 
the  stockhouse  the  material  is  next  taken  to  another  set  of  r 
principle,  which  grind  the  ore  fine.  The  powdered  ore  is 
material  returned  for  closer  crushing,  and  the  fine  delivered  to 
which  form  the  distinctive  feature  of  the  Edison  process. 

The  magnets  are  ranged  in  series,  one  below  the  oth 
or  tailings  that  have  passed  the  first  magnet  are  treated  by  t 
till  all  the  iron  is  thoroughly  extracted  from  the 'powdered 
straight  on,  and  is  carried  out  of  the  building,  and  the  iror 
the  stockhouses.  An  extremely  ingenious  process  (invent 
.  thoroughly  cleanses  the  concentrates  of  whatever  excess  of 
the  process  of  crushing  and*  magnetic  separation. 

These  concentrates,  being  in  a  fine  powdered  state,  cannot  I 
furnace,  and  have,  consequently,  to  be  compressed  into  brii 
thoroughly  mixed  with  a  binding  material,  and  then  pressec 
squeezing  force  of  60,000  lbs.,  and  roasted  in  a  furnace  heat 
These  briquettes  are  impervious  to  moisture,  but  are  at  the  i 
the  gases  from  the  blast  furnace  can  penetrate  to  their  cent 
atures  they  are  hard,  and  can  be  shipped  in  the  same  way 
they  do  not  disintegrate  under  the  action  of  heat  in  the  blast 


Report  of  Mr.  Andrew  S.  McCreath  upon  Hematite  Separat 

Chemical  Laboratory, 

223,  Market  Street, 
Harrisburg 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  Esq.,  Orange,  N.J. 

Dear  Sir, — In  presenting  the  following  report,  I  take  the 
your  letter  dated  February  23rd,  in  which  you  say:  “I  have  1 


The  following  is  a  short  description  of  the  Edison  Process. 


REMARKS  ON  No.  5  SAMPLE;  FINAL  CONCENTRATE  SPECULAR 
HEMATITE. — This  Specular  IJematite,  as  explained  at  the  outset  of  my  report,  pre¬ 
sented,  what  was  at  one  time,  .the  great  difficulty  of  separation  owing  to  the  Ore  being 
only  very  slightly  magnetic.  It  is  therefore  very  satisfactory  to  know  from  these  analyses 
that  the  same  remarks  apply  to  the  Specular  as  to  the  Magnetite,  viz.,  that  the  Ore  has 
been  changed  from  an  impure  condition  to  one  high  in  Iron  and  low  in  Sulphur  and 
Phosphorus,  and  made  entirely  suitable  for  the  manufacture  of  high-class  Steel  by  the 
Acid  processes. 

No.  ^Analyses  of  Apatite  shows,  by  the  separation  process,  that  the  Phosphorus 

It  is  therefore  evident  from  the  foregoing  that  the  Edison  process  of 
separating  the  Dunderland  Ore  from  its  gangue  is  quite  successful. 

Yours  faithfully, 


Extract  from  the  Presidential  Address  (1901)  to  the  Iron  and  Steel  Institute,  by 
Mr.  William  Whitwell,  of  the  Thornaby  Iron  Works,  Thornaby-on-Tees. 

(1)  By  far  the  greater  part  of  our  steel  in  this  country  is  made  by  the  acid  Bessemer 
and  Siemens  ,  processes,  requiring  a  pure  pig  iron  as  low  in  phosphorus  as  possible, 

t  he  question,  then,  of  the  supply  of  pure  ore  to  make;  this  class  of  pig  iron,  is  one 

which  will  have  to  be  faced  by  us  in  the  near  future.  Our  only  native  supply  of  pure 
ore  of  the  Cumberland  district  is  rapidly  approaching  exhaustion.  In  many  works  the 
ore  now  used  is  of  very  much  lower  yield  of  iron  than  it  used  to  be,  and  Spanish  and 
other  foreign  ore  is  being  imported  in  increasing  quantities  to  help  out  the  local  supply. 
Un  the.  east  coast  and  in  other  hematite  iron-making  districts,  nothing  but  foreign 

ore  is  used,  the  greater  part  coming  from  Bilbao.  We  often  hear  reports  of  the  near 

exhaustion  of  this  famous,  deposit,  and  recently  —  ......  .  ... 


id  the  Bilbao  exports  of  the  last  five 
•e  taken  from  C.  E.  Muller  and  Co.’s  am 
om  north  Spanish  ports  near  Bilbao: 


means  at  hand  for  verifying  this  estimate, 
irs  do  not  enlighten  us.  These  statistics 
il  report,  and  include  the  ore  also  shipped 


4,959,803 

■  fg % 

Though  there  was  a  steady  decrease  from  1896,  there  was  a  sudden  increase  of 
er  one  million  tons  in  1899,  the  highest  export  on  record.  Last  year  showed  a  decrease 
60,000  tons,  but  whether  due  to  diminished  wmni«  nr  - - - - 


Col.  Turretini,  of  Geneva,  formerly  employed  on  the  Niagara  and  Get 
lations,  was,  on  the  recommendation  of  Mr.  T.'  A.  Edison  and  Lord  Kelv 
requested  by  the  Edison  Ore  Milling  Syndicate  to  survey  and  report  or 
power  available  on  the  Dunderland  property.  In  the  course  of  his  reporl 
as  follows : — 

As  per  request  I  went  during  the  course  of  July  to  Mo,  in  order  to  visit  I 
“  Renfossen,”  which  you  desire  to  utilise  for  supplying  motive  power  necs 
exploitation  of  the  Iron  Ore  beds  of  Urtvand,  situated  about  ten  kilomel 
Waterfall,  “  Renfossen,”  which  themselves  are  about  fifteen  kilometers  dist; 


On  the  19th  July  I  visited  “Renfossen”  together  with  Dr.  Lehman 
you  that  the  “  Renfossen  ”  waterfall  is  fed  by  the  Dunderland  River,  which 
kilometre  above  the  fall  received  an  important  confluence  coming  fro 
Langvand. 

An  approximate  test  made  on  the  1 9th  July,  together  with  Dr.  Lehn 
a  volume  of  water  of  about  550  cubic  metres  per  second.  According  to  I 
made  by  Dr.  Lehmann,  the  low  water  in  winter  time  will  reach  r5o  cubic  met 
mg  to  the  state  of  the  banks  the  exceptional  high  water  must  considerably 

Dr.  Lehmann  informed. me  that  your  Syndicate  desired  to  utilise  at  th 
ment  4,000  effective  H.P.  (B.H.P.)  on  the  turbine  shaft,  to  be  increased 
1 0,000  H.P.,  which  will  be  required. 

According  to  a  measurement  made  duiing  the  last  days  in  July  by  Dr.  : 
gross  height  of  the  fall  was  a  little  more  than  30  metres.  Supposing  that  I 
fall  of  30  metres  were  reduced  to  25  metres,  owing  to  loss  by  friction  in 
and  pipes  and  to  the  variations  caused  by  die  season,  the  volume  of  water 
obtaining  10,000  H.P.  on  the  turbine  shaft  (taking  the  useful  effect  of  the 
per  cent.)  would  be  40  cubic  metres. 

This  proyes  that  under  any  circumstances  the  waterfall,  “Renfossei 
supply,  and  supply  more  than  the  10,000  H.P.  required,  and  that  this  fig 
trebled  or  even  quadrupled  if  it  were  necessary. 


EXPENSES. 


ESTIMATE, 
oposal  on  the  le 


Works  for  the  bringing  up  of  the  water  to 

Covered  over  Canal  ...  . 

Distribution  Chamber 

Grids  ’  . . 

Wrought  Iron  Piping  (3  for  3 
Turbines)  2m.  300  dram. 

Turbine  House 
Turbines  and  Accessories 

Dynamos  and  Tablets  . 

Escape  Canal  ...  : . 


First  stage  of  Total  price  for 


of 


These  figures  are  of  course  only  approximate,  but  are  based  upon  reliable  data  and 
upon  the  cost  of  similar  works  already  executed  in  connection  with  waterfalls,  the  con¬ 
ditions  of  which  were  practically  the  same  (turbines  of  1,800  H.P.,  and  a  waterfall  of  27m.) 

The  price  of  the  installation  per  turbine  H.P.,  including  the  electric  installation, 
would  therefore  be  for  4,000  H.P.  (plus  2,000  in  reserve)  320  francs  per  H.P. ;  for  10,000 
H.P.  (plus  2,000  in  reserve)  209  francs  per  H.P. 

These  figures  are  extremely  low. 


Col.  Turretini  then  discusses  the  steps  necessary  to  avoid  ice  difficulties  in  the 
event  of  severe  weather,  and  proceeds : — 

At  “  Renfossen,”  according  to  the  information  obtained,  the  river  freezes  above  the 
falls  to  a  great  distance,  for  the  speed  of  the  river  is  very  slight  and  the  sheet  of  water 
forms  a  tranquil  lake.  It  seems,  therefore,  that  the  conditions  are  favourable  for  admit¬ 
ting  of  continuous  work  during  the  winter,  excepting  a  stoppage  for  one  or  two  days  at 
the  time  when  the  layer  of  superficial  ice  is  forming,  in  November,  and  another  stoppage 
for  one  or  two  days  when  the  ice  breaks  up  in  the  Spring.  / 


(Signed)  COL.  TURRETINI. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Edison  Portland  Cement  Company 

"Works  of  the  Edison  Portland  Cement  Company,  Stewartsville,  New 
Jersey."  1902. 

"Edison  Portland  Cement  Co.,  New  Village,  N.J."  Ca.  1909. 


WORKS  OF  THE  EDISON  PORTLAND 
CEMENT  COMPANY 
STEWARTSVILLE,  NEW  JERSEY 


3 


Crusher  House 

Capacity  3000  tons  per  day. 
Giant  rolls,  5  feet  wide,  5  feet  in 
will  crush  rocks  of  from  five  tc 
reducing  them  to  ^  an  inch  ai 
passing  through  the  first,  second 
set  of  36-inch  rolls. 

Engine,  vertical  c 

Dryer  House 

Capacity  3000  r 


Rod  Stod  House 

Storage  capacity  10,500  tons. 

Weighing  and  Mixing  House 

Two  receiving  bins,  capacity  60  tons  each. 
T wo  weighing  bins,  capacity  i  o  tons  each. 

Small  Rock  Stock  House 


Chalk  Grinding  House 

grinding  rolls ;  others  arc  to  be  added, 
bringing  them  up  to  a  producing  capacity 
of  5000  barrels  of  cement  per  day. 
When  the  house  is  increased  as  shown  by 
dotted  lines,  and  other  rolls  added,  the 


producing  capacity  will  be  10,000  barrels 
per  day. 

Engine,  vertical  cross-compound  con¬ 
densing,  750  horse-power. 


Boiler  House 

Three  Climax  boilers,  500  h 
each,  basis  30  pounds  water. 
To  be  increased  so  as  to  co 
more  boilers  of  the  same  capac 

Clinker  Crusher  House 

Two  sets  of  36-inch  rolls. 
Capacity  3000  tons  per  day. 

Clinker  Stock  House 
Storage  capacity  2500  tons. 
To  be  increased  as  shown  by  d 


Clinker  Grinding  House 

grinding  rolls. 

See  Chalk  Grinding  House. 
Engine,  vertical  cross-compt 


densing,  750  horse-power. 

Blower  House  No.  2 

At  present  containing  1 6  bins  an 
See  Blower  House  No.  i . 


Cement  Stock  House 


Cement  Bagging  House 

Containing  four  bagging  and 
■  ing  machines, 


Coal  Grizzley 

Coal  dumped  here  from  cars 


Blower  House  No.  I 


PO  RT  LAN  D  G  EM  ENT 


ytW 


THE  EDISON  PORTLAND  CEMENT  COMPANY 


crushing  machinery  except  the  EDISON  GIANT  ROLLS  is  capable  of  reducing 


EDISON  PORTLAND  CEMENT- 


ily  believers  in  fine  grinding. 


eminent  author 


rial  importance  in  enabling  it  to  take  a  large 
fine  particles  of  cement  really  have  much 
e  sand  than  cement.” 


being  delivered 


railroad  from  the  quarry  to  the 


EDISON  PORTLAND  CEMENT— 

The  Cement  recognized  everywhere  by  its  fineness. 


that  with  finer  grinding  the  liability 


Germany  and  England  demonstrate  the  importance  of  fine  grinding. 


Approach  to  the  incline  leading  to  the  crushing  rolls  on  the  left.  After  being  crushed,  the 


rock  is  carried  up  an  inclined  conveyor  to  the  building  in  the  center,  where  it  descends  through 
a  vertical  dryer  which  removes  all  the  moisture.  The  building  to  the  right  is  the  weigh  house, 
where  all  the  materials  are  carefully  proportioned  by  ACCURATE  WEIGHING.  (See  page  IS.) 


INTERIOR 
t  used  in  the 


WEIGH  HOUSE. 


pper  needle  dipping  into  a  m 
;opped,  and  it  is  Impossible  to 
igain  brought  into  adjustment. 


I  SIEVES  ARE  UNGROUND  CLINKER,  NOT  PORTLAND  CEMENT. 
Portland  Cement  has  less  residue  than  any  other  brand. 


one  considers  th; 
nd  that  to  limit  tl 
this  same  quantity 


"  The  finer  the  cement  the  larger  the  quantity  of  sand  that  may  he  legitimately  used  with 
it.  The  coarse  particles  of  cement  are  to  be  considered  as  inert  material,  or  practically  as  a  certain 
amount  of  sand  already  mixed  with  the  cement.”— -Hydraulic  Cement"— Spalding. 


of  cement  is  always  conceded 
fineness  is  omitted  in  none  1 


CLINKER  GRINI 
dison  Grinding  Rol 
md  Cement  daily, 


THE  SECRET  OF  QUALITY. 


shipping 


i  degree,  by  bringing  into  action  the 
cement  capable  of  coating  a  larger 


iroves  Portland  Cement 
by  rendering  a  given 


“Fine  grinding 
best  burned  clinker  i 
number  of  sand  grains 


of  Edison  Portland  Cement  ready  for  delivery  to  the  railroad  company 
irious  destinations  in  all  parts  of  United  States  and  Canada. 


'Higher  strength 


sly  be  effected  by 


- 

,  Ji.  , 

R 

m 

afc® 

1 

Hi- 

fr 

_ 

readily  recognized  how 
ore  finely.  As  cements 


NORRIS  BUILDING,  BOSTON,  MASS. 


ADDITION  TO  GORE  HALL,  HARVARD  COLLEGE,  CAMBRIDGE,  MASS. 

EMERSON  &  NORRIS, 

8c  SMITH,  Concrete  Stone.  Edison  Oe 


WARREN 


Portland  Cement  is  used  with  sand  in  99  cases  out  of  100. 

Note  the  sand-carrying  capacity  which  your 


reports. 


UNDERWOOD  BUILDING,  HARTFORD,  CONN. 

TIDEWATER  BUILDING  CO.,  Contractors.  ISAAC  A.  ALLEN,  Architect,  Har 

Concrete  floors  and  masonry,  10,000  barrels  of  Edison  Portland  Cement  used. 


wllty.  Water 
The  finer  a  ce, 


ly  on  the  finer  particles, 
ground  the  greater  will 


Ill 

(If 

MPi 

Ilf 

i  , 

"The  strength  of  the  cement,  and  particularly  its  tensile  strength  when  mixed  with  sand, 
icreases  with  the  fineness."— "Cemen/s,  Limes  and  Plasters  "—Eckel. 


istantly 


of  fine  grinding  is  evident,  and  engineers 


specifications. 


Building, 


"  The  same  series  of  experiments  also  demonstrated  very  clearly  that  free  lime  (or  whatever 
the. destructive  agent  may  he),  contained  within  the  coarse  particles  is  chiefly  responsible  for  the 
unsoundness  of  cement.”— '‘Portland  Cement"—  D.  B.  Butler. 


mm 


iiiiiiliiflSiiii 


EDISON  PORTLAND  CEMENT 


GENERAL  OFFICE 


BUILDINGS  NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  WORKS,  ORANGE, 


POWER  HOUSE,  CENTRAL  PENNSYLVANIA  TRACTION  COMPANY, 
HARRISBURG,  PA. 

HOWARD  LLOYD,  MASON  D.  PRATT, 


msmmaBsam 

■  '■ t  -<  a  taj m  '-nil  6ia  HHH 

BffiWllii il 


*£^£=il=MLA 

FRICK  ANNEX,  PITTSBURG,  PA. 


3  as  he  requires  just  enough  for 
coating  is  all  that  is  required. 


EDISON  CEMENT  especially  useful  in  flue  facings  and  ornamental  work 


Double  Arch,  Partially  Completed, 
Norfolk  and  Western  R.  R. 
BUNTING  &  MALONE,  Contractors. 


EDISON  PORTLAND  OEMENT- 

85  per  cent,  through  a  200-mesh  sieve.  98  per  cent,  through  a  100-mesh  sieve. 


Sand  is  an  indispensable  ingredient  of  good  concrete,  hut  it  is  not  necessary  to  introduce 
it  into  the  mixture  as  part  of  the  Portland  Cement.  It  is  cheaper  to  huy  it  as  sand  than  as 
residues  in  the  cement. 


HERANOOURT  BREWERY,  CINCINNATI,  0. 
PRANK  W.  POLZ  &  00.,  Contractors, 
Cincinnati,  0. 


Constructed  by  Field,  Booker  &  Underwood,  _ 
feet  in  diameter;  depth,  16  feet;  capacity,  12,000,000 
— Edison  Cement  UBed  exclusively. 


L _ 


The  Edison  Portland  Cement  Company  increased  their  capacity 


Residues  are  present  because  the  manufacturer 
We  reduce  the  evil  to  i 


conomically. 


"  All  coarse  particles,  i.  e. 
should  he  removed,  as  they  do 


lumps  of 
together  i 


GREAT  FALLS  STATION,  SOUTHERN  POWER  00. 


'QUISISANA”  SPRING  AND  CASINO,  GREEN  COVE  SPRINGS,  FLORIDA. 
Designed  and  Erected  by  LOUIS  H.  McKEE,  Trenton,  N.  J. 

Edison  Portland  Cement  used  exclusively. 


100-mesh  sieve 
se  requirements 


DEAL  BEACH  CASINO,  REINFORCED 
WESTLEORAFT  &  SON,  Contractors,  Bemardsville,  New  J 


CONCRETE  THROUGHOUT, 
rorsey.  DAVID  AO] 

clusively. 


passing  a  200-mesh 


lbs.  per  barrel. 


STANDARD  ROLLER-BEARING  BUILDING,  PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 
BALLINGER  &  PERROT,  Engineers  and  Architects 
Philadelphia,  Pa. 


A  few  years  ago  IB  per  cent,  was  permitted 
Now  the  usual  maximum  allowable  is  8  per  cent 


appreciated  everywhere. 


HEYWOOD  BROS.  &  WAKEFIELD  GO’S  BUILDING, 
Fifth  and  Locust  Streets,  Philadelphia. 
PERROT,  Architects,  Philadelphia.  MOORE  &  00.,  Inc.,  Oont 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery,  1903."  1904. 

"A  Few  Suggestions  for  Central  Station  Managers,  Containing  Some 
Advertisements  We  Have  Used  and  Are  About  To  Use  for  the  New 
Edison  Storage  Battery."  Ca.  1910. 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery:  Useful  Information."  Form  90. 1910. 

"The  Edison  Storage  Battery."  Form  75. 1910. 

"The  1910  Edison  Storage  Battery,"  by  Walter  Holland.  1910.  [Bound  with 
"A  Test  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery,"  by  the  Electrical  Testing 
Laboratories.  Both  papers  were  read  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the 
Association  of  Edison  Illuminating  Companies,  Thousand  Islands,  NY, 
September  6-8,  1910.] 


The  EDISON 
STORAGE 
BATTERY 


% 


SHE  EDISON  STORAGE 
BATTERY  COMPANY 

announces  the  final  completion 

which,  it  is  believed,  will  solve 
the  problem  of  vehicle  traction  in  a  perfectly  satisfac¬ 
tory  manner. 

Before  starting  on  his  long  and  exhaustive  series 
of  experiments  in  search  of 'an  improved  electric 
storage  battery,  Mr.  Edison  came  to  the  conclusion 
that  a  successful  battery  must  possess  the  following 
requirements  before  a  satisfactory  solution  of  the 
vehicle  traction  problem  could  be  found.  . 

First.  That  no  corrosive  acids  should  be  used, 
hence  the  liquid  must  be  an  alkali. 

Second.  That  all  the  active  materials  used  must 
be  insoluble  in  the  liquid. 

Third.  That  the  liquid  should  under  all  con¬ 
ditions  of  charge  or  discharge  remain  the  same. 

Fourth.  That  the  materials  should  be  light  in 
weight. 


'  Fifth.  That  the  mechanical  construction  should 
be  strong. 

Sixth.  That  there  should  be  practically  no  dis¬ 
integration  or  deterioration  from  use. 

’  Seventh.  That  the  operation  of  charging  '  and 
discharging  the  battery  and  its  care  should  be  of  so 
simple  a  character  that  the  layman  could  get  as 
good  results  as  the  expert. 


Eighth.  That  it  should  '  not  be  injured  by  over¬ 
charging,  by  heavy  discharges,  by  discharging  to 
zero,  by  standing  charged,  partially  charged  or  com¬ 
pletely  discharged  for  any  length  of  time. 

Ninth.  That  the  rate  of  charge  and  discharge 
should  be  high. 

Tenth.  Finally,  that  the  weight  per  horse-power 
per  hour  should  be  small  and  the  capacity  cbnstant 
over  long  periods  of  time. 

We  believe  that  in  the  battery  now  offered  by 
us,  Mr.  Edison  has  achieved  every  one  of  the  above 
requirements.  Experiments  with  our  batteries  in 
automobiles,  in  actual  practice,  extending  over  a 
period  of  more  than  one  year,  show  that  there  is  no 
appreciable  deterioration  mechanically  or  electri¬ 
cally,  and  while  no  one  can  predict  the  future,  we 
firmly  believe  that  our  battery  will  last  for  many 
years  and  prove  perfectly  satisfactory  to  the  public. 


Fig.  i. 


TECHNICAL  DESCRIPTION 

general  appearance  the  cell  is  most 

I  lilllt  construct>01'1  throughout.  Every 
M  Eg  opportunity  for  improvement  has 

been  embraced,  regardless  of  cost,  and 

ness  in  design,  strength,  durability  or  lasting  qualities  of  the 
cell  has  been  neglected.  The  structural  .material  of  which 
the  cell  is  composed  is  steel.  The  grids  and  cups  that  sup¬ 
port  the  active  material,  the  connecting  and  binding  posts, 
the  spacing  washers,  nuts,  containing  envelope  or  jar  and 
cover  are  all  made  of  steel.  In  fact,  the  entire  cell  is  con¬ 
structed  of  steel,  except  for  a  small  amount  of  hard  rubber 
used  to  insulate  the  plates  from  the  sides,  bottom  arid  cover 
of  the  containing  envelope  and  each  adjacent  plate  from  its 
neighbor.  Consequently,  the  cell  is  of  a  most  lasting  and 
enduring  nature  throughout. 

Each  individual  metal  piece  employed  in  the  construc¬ 
tion  of  the  cell  is  plated  before  use  with  a  heavy  coat  of 
nickel,  which,  by  special  process,  is  fused  to  the  steel. 
This  adds  materially  to  the  durability  and  finish  of  the  cell. 

The  active  materials — consisting  of  specially-prepared 
oxides  of  nickel  and  iron — are  loaded  into  very  finely  per¬ 
forated  cups  or  pockets.  Each  cup  or  pocket  is  made  in  two 
sections,  one  engaging  within  the  other.  (See  Figs.  3  and  4.) 


i 


When  filled  with  active  material,  twenty-four  (24)  of 
these  little  cups  or  pockets  are  placed  in  twenty-four  (24) 
suitable  rectangular  openings  in  a  thin  grid  (see  Fig.  6) 
and  the  whole  is  subjected  to  a  very  high  pressure.  This 
locks  the  two  sections  of  each  cup  firmly  together  and  at 
the  same  time  fastens  them  securely  in  the  grid.  The 
result  is  an  extremely  strong  plate  mechanically  and  one  of 
remarkable  lightness.  (See  Fig.  j.) 

Electrically  the  plate  is  highly  satisfactory,  as  each  little 
pocket  becomes  almost  an  integral  part  of  the  supporting 
grid  when  subjected  to  high  pressure. 

The  eye  can  detect  practically  no  difference  in  general 
appearance  between  a  plate  loaded  with  nickel  oxide  and 
one  loaded  with  iron  oxide 


In  the  Type  “D”  cell,  consisting  of  28  plates  and 
which  we  are  now  prepared  to  supply,  fourteen  (14)  nickel 
plates— plates  loaded  with  nickel  oxide— are  strung  on  a 
connecting  rod  to  which  is  fastened  a  suitable  binding  post. 
Each  plate  is  separated  from  the  next  by  a  spacing  washer 
and  the  whole  is  held  firmly  in  place  by  a  nut  which  screws 
on  the  end  of  the  connecting  rod.  (See  Fig.  9.) 

These  fourteen  (14)  nickel  plates  are  connected  to  the 
positive  pole  of  the  cell. 

Fourteen  (14)  iron  plates — plates  loaded  with  iron 
oxide — are  assembled  in  identically  the  same  manner  as  are 
the  fourteen  (14)  nickel  plates.  'These  are  connected  to 
the  negative  pole  of  the  cell. 

The  positive  and  negative  elements  are  so  assembled 
that  each  iron  plate  has  a  nickel  plate  on  either  side  of  it  • 
each  nickel  plate  an  iron  plate  on  either  side  of  it,  except 
in  the  case  of  the  two  end  plates,  one  of  which  i4  a  nickel 
the  other  an  iron  plate.  (See  Fig.  8.)  The  outer  surfaces 
of  these  two  plates  are  in  juxtaposition  with  two  sheets  of 
hard  rubber  that  insulate  the  plates  from  contact  with  the 
sides  of  the  containing  jar. 

The  iron  and  nickel  plates  are  prevented  from  coming 
in  contact  by  means  of  hard  rubber  rods  of  a  diamond¬ 
shaped  cross  section,  a  number  of  which  are  placed  between 
each  set  of  abutting  nickel  and  iron  plate  surfaces.  (See 

Fig-  <?•)  . 

In  the  near  future,  cells  having  fewer  plates  and  others 
with  more  than  twenty-eight  plates  as  in  Tyfie  “  D,”  will 
be  manufactured  to  cover  all  the  requirements  of  the 
trade. 

The  containing  envelope  or  jar  is  made  of  corrugated 
sheet  steel,  the  sides  of  which  are  prevented  from  coming 
in  contact  with  the  plates  by  the  sheets  of  hard  rubber 
mentioned  above.  The  ends  and  bottom  of  the  jar  are 
protected  from  contact  with  the  plates  by  means  of  specially 
designed  pieces  of  hard  rubber.  (See  Fig.  7.) 


The  cover  is  securely  soldered  to  the  jar  by  a  special 
solder.  On  the  cover  are  mounted  two  stuffing  boxes 
through  which  the  binding  posts,  fastened  to  the  positive 
and  negative  elements  of  the  cell,  extend. 

There  are  two  other  mountings  on  the  cover.  (See 
Fig.  10.)  One  is  called  a  “Separator.”  The  function  of 
this  is  to  separate  the  spray  from  the  gases  when  the- 
battery  is  charged,  thus  preventing  loss  of  potash  and 
causing  the  gases  to  be  inodorous.  ;  \ 

The  other  is  called  a  “  Filler.”"  The  function  of  this 
is  to  afford  a  suitable  passage  through  which  the  electrolyte 
— a  20-per  cent,  solution  of  potash — may  be  supplied  to 
the  cell  and  through  which  Distilled  Water  may  be  added 
to  the  cell  from  time  to  time  as  the  level  of  the  electrolyte 
is  lowered  by  evaporation  and  overcharging. 

The  “  Filler  ”  has  a  water-tight  cover  which  is  held  in 
place  by  a  strong  catch  (see  Fig.  1 1).  Fastened  to  the 
cover  is  a  small  spring  which  causes  it  to  fly  open  when  the 
catch  is  released  and  it  cannot  be  closed  again  without  some 

)\ 


possiblespillingof  solution 

Fig.  12.  Hard  Rubber  Cell  Separators  and  should  the  Cells  be  Severely 
Pray  Insulator  agitated. 

Each  individual  cell  is  held  securely  in  place  and  free 
from  contact  with  its  neighbor  by  a  very  ingenious  little 
rubber  device  which  performs  the  double  office  of  insulator 
between  cells  and  lock  to  hold  them  firmly  in  position 
in  the  trays. 

Every  cell  rests  upon  a  thin  sheet  of  hard  rubber 
pressed  into  a  suitable  shape.  This  effectually  insulates 
the  cells  from  the  bottom  of  the  trays.  (See  Fig.  12.) 

In  the  bottom  of  each  cell  are  four  small  indentations. 
These  fit  over  conveniently  arranged  little  wooden  buttons 
protruding  from  the  upper  side  of  the  tray  bottom  and 
prevent  the  cells  from  becoming  displaced  by  sudden  jolts 
or  shocks  while  affording  a  very  rigid  yet  elastic  support. 

The  connection  between  cells  is  made  by  means  of 

heavy  solid  copper  wire  . 

of  each  copper  connector 
are  screwed  specially 
shaped  steel  lugs  which 
fit  over  the  binding  posts 
and  make  a  taper  joint 
connection  with  them,  in¬ 
suring  a  perfect  electrical 


A  nut  holds  each  lug  securely  in  place.  This  makes  bad 
contact  impossible  even  though  the  battery  is  subjected  to 
extremely  violent  jolting  such  as  it  often  receives  in  electric 
automobiles. 

A  socket  wrench  for  removing  the  nuts  which  hold 
down  the  connectors  and  a  specially  designed  jack  for  lifting 
the  lugs  from  the  binding  posts  when  disconnecting  the  cells 
are  sent  with  each  battery  (see  Fig.  14).  Also  a  patented 


funnel  equipped  with  .an  indicator  which  shows  when  the  right 
mount  pf'  olution  In  teen  put  ,n  the  cell  (SecT.jp,  j  V 
•’’‘A  length  of  rubber  hose  and  a  copper  jean  .t  S’  hold| 
enough^  distilled  water '  to  supply  the  requirements  o^  the 
l|at^ery"for  some  little  time  can  also  be  supplied  at  nominal 
cost.  .By  using  the  can  in  connection  with  the  funnel  the 
battery  may  be  supplied  with  such  water  as  it  needs  with 
the  minimum  of  labor,  time  and  expense. 


'•  Supplying 


From  the  above  description  and  from  the  illustrations 
shown,  it  can  readily  be  seen  that  Mr.  Edison  has 
developed  this  cell  to  a  very  high  state  of  perfection. 

Of  course,  any  number  of  cells  may  be  connected 
together  to  form  a  battery  of  any  desired  power. 

The  cells  are  put  up  in  nicely  finished  wooden  trays. 
These  are  built  in  three  standard  sizes,  namely,  to  hold 
four,  five  and  six  cells. 


Jf.=The  jcompany.  ioes'not  encoufage'the'use^of  singie  tra 
hqldiiig  more  tharfsix  cells,  owing  to  the  ii'fficuity  thaVmi 
be  experienced  in  Handling  them  readily:  .  p-y- 

Thc  trays  are  made  of  a  very  strong  and  lasting  wot 
(see  Fig.  2),  the  pores  of  every  piece  of  which  are  fill! 
with  a  preparation  before  it  is  assembled  to  preserve  it. 


This  company  owns  and  controls  the  following  Unite 
States  patents  of  Thomas  A.  Edison,  which  fully  prote 
its  products  and  processes. 

678,722  Dated  July  1 6th,  1901 
684,204  “  October  8th,  1901 

684,20;  ••  October  8th,  1901 

692,507  •*  February  4th,  1902 

700.136  •«  May  13th,  1902 

700.137  *■  May  13th,  1902 

701,804  "  June  3d,  1902 

704.303  ■<  July  8th,  1902 

704.304  ■■  July  8th,  1902 

704.305  July  8jh,  1902  '  : 

704.306  <•  July  8th,  1902 

721,682  •*  March  3d,  1903 

.  721,870  “  March  3d,  1903 

723.449  “  March  24th,  1903 

723.450  •*  March  24th,  1903 

727.117  May  5th,  1903 

727.1 18  “  May  5th,  1903 

Other  patents  pending 

The  company  also  operates  under  license  from  M 
Edison,  Patent  No.  734,522,  dated  July  28th,  1903. 


1,776,000  jolts”  of  i  inch  each 

Here  is  the  apparatus  used  by  Mr.  Edison  in  test¬ 
ing  the  mechanical  strength,  of  the  Edison  Storage 
Battery.  Like  all  his  tests,  the  strain  imposed  was  many 
times  greater  than  will  ever  be  met  with  in  practice. 

The  cell  was  raised  and  dropped  one-half  an 
incA  h 7 J 6,0 00  times— a  million  and  three  quarter 
half -inch  jolts  aggregating  74,000  feet. 

Edison  battery  points  ...  Edison  method  combining 

ngnt  weight  and  rugged  strength 
•  °lf|»v'rirbrro7w!H  enabled  the  cell  to  go  through  the 
NTjH|Si?,n,C0 ,or lruck onJ  test  uninjured. 

^Hn°ShSuiin  *“!  n,‘™  Neither  its  electrical  capacity  nor 
mechanical  construction  were  im- 
Paired  in,  afiy  way,  because  steel, 
iron  and  nickel  will  endure  shocks 
N.fggfE’SS#!  that  heayy  lead  ,  plates  cannot  posl 
sibly  undergo. 

.  .I,'  Not  to  mention  the  disintegration 

^iSfy'SiSVeSSSorthlmi?  actiye  material  found  in  the  old 

s  only 8tmaterira]B  style  lead  batteries. 

running  lx-  The  E Ji»on  Storage  Battery  Perfects  the  One 

Weak  Link  in  the  Electric  Vehicle  Chain 

Edison  Storage  Battery  Company, _L.te.ueAv^.«r,WI., 


The  One  Weak  Spot 

In  Electric  Wagon  Success 

Everybody  in  the  business  knows  what  has  retarded  the  ad¬ 
vance  to  which  Electric  Vehicles  have  been  rightfully  entitled, 
— (1)  heavy  lead  batteries  fhat  required  constant  supervision  at 
the  hands  of  an  expert,  and  (2)  even  then  a  short  life  in  heavy 
work  of  from  8  to  15  months  at  best—  ‘ 

.Lead  batteries  could  not  be  depended  upon,  not  for  any  lack  of  skill  on  the  part  of  the 
manufacturer,  but  because  of  the  inherent  defects  In  the  principle  involved.  They  were 
heavy  in  weight  and  rapidly  decreased  in  capacity  even  under  the  expert  supervision  of  skilled  battery 
experts. 

The  weak  spot  that  so  checked  Electric  Vehicle  progress  ceased  to  exist  with  the  advent 
ofr  the  Edison  Storage  Battery,  because  this  battery  overcomes  all  the  objections  to  the 
lead-acid  combination.  It  has  no  lead  to  crumble;  no  acids  to  destroy.  Therefore  there 
is  no  corrosion,  no  dropping  out  of  active  material.  The  weight  is  one-half  for  the  same 
output.  The  capacity,  instead  of  falling  off,  increases  with  use.  due  to  the  better  contact 
of  the  active  materials  and  the  conductors. 


The  value  of  all  the  horses  in  the  United  States  is  $3,400,000,000 — over 
3 h  billions  of  dollars ! 


The  value  of  the  hay  and  oat  crops  in  1909  was  $1,097,519,000— more 
than  twice  the  value  of  the  wheat  crop ! 

These  vast  sums  give  an  idea  of  the  size  of  the  trucking  business,  which  is 
being  constantly  deflected  from  the  Central  Stations  and  Vehicle  Makers, 
because  in  the  past  the  only  storage  battery  available  was  the  lead-acid  com¬ 
bination  with  its  great  weight,  short  life  and  multiplied  troubles. 

The  electric  wagon  was  all  right — the  electric  motor  perfect — but  the 
battery  was  the  weak  link  in  the  chain. 

The  Edison  Storage  Battery  puts  the  electric  wagon  and  truck  business 
largely  in  the  hands  of  the  Central  Stations  for  the  future,  because  of  its  Light 
Weight,  Rugged  Strength  and  Reliability,  without  the  trouble  man  as  a 
constant  factor  and  the  repairs,  washings,  etc.,  heretofore  linked  in  as  an  in¬ 
tegral  part  of  the  storage  battery  business.  ' 


EDISON  BATTERY  POINTS 


One  Edison  Battery  will  outlast  6  to  8  lead  batteries  in  the  hands  of  the  layman, 
not  to  mention  the 'tremendous  item  of  repairs  and  main¬ 
tenance  required  by  even  the  best  of  the  lead  batteries 


EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY,  Lakeside  Avenue,  Orange,  N.  J. 


less  than  H 


The  Edison  Storage  Battery  weighs  Jess  than  one- 
half  what  lead  batteries  weigh  for  the  same  capac¬ 
ity,  covering  active  use  during  one  year. 

This  advantage  in  vehicle  work  can  be  utilized 
either  to  reduce  the  total  batteiy  weight  or  to 
increase  the  output  or  mileage  radius. 

A  striking  example  of  this  can  be  seen  in  a  large  , 
manufacturing  plant  in  Jersey  which  .  had  two 
5-ton  trucks  with  lead  batteries.  Finding  these 
wholly  unsatisfactory  climbing  steep  hills,  they 
adopted  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  for  one  of 
these  trucks.  After  four  months’  use  they  equip¬ 
ped  the  second  truck  with  an  Edison  Battery. 

The  salient  points  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
are  Reliability,  Economy  of  Operation,  and  a  great 
final  economy  in  cost  of  the  battery  by  reason  of 
its  long  life. 

Even  for  heavy  truck  service  we  are  able  to  offer 
a  guarantee  of  three  years’  life.  The  factor  of 
safety  to  ourselves  when  making  this  minimum 
guarantee  is  evidence  of  a  battery  life  far  in 
excess  of  the  three-year  minimum. 


Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

,  104  Lakeside  Avenue,  Orange,  N.  J. 


One  of  Two  Things 

The  Edison  Storage  Battery  increases  the  effective 
mileage  of  Electric  Vehicles — or  reduces  the  weight 
of  the  vehicle. 

This  is  because,  for  each  pound  of  weight,  it  gives  an  active  service  which  is 
twice  the  watt  output  that  a  lead  battery  is  capable  of  giving  in  active 
service  over  a  period  of  only  one  year.  The  Edison  Battery  is  legally 
guaranteed  for  heavy-duty  truck  service  for  3  years. 

Such  a  tremendous  advantage  can  be  seized  upon  to  reduce  the  total  weight 
ot  the  vehicle  as  well  as  that  of  the  battery  itself.  Or  to  secure  an  increased 
mileage— either  or  both— within  motor-voltage  limitations. 

The  one  weak  spot  that  has  held  back  all  the  advances  to  which  Electric  Vehicles 
have  been  rightfully  entitled,  has  been  the  lead  battery  with  Its  great  weight,  troubles 
and  short  life. 


With  a  lighter  and  more  rugged  battery  Electric  Vehicles  would,  years  ago, 
have  come  into  their  own.  The  electric  motor  would  have  done  for  them 
what  it  has  done  for  street  cars. 

The  Edison  Storage  Battery  with  its  light,  rugged  construction  combines 
minimum  weight  with  long  life  and  reliability. 

The  legal  guarantee  given  for  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  in  truck  service  is 
5  years,  but  the  actual,  practical  life  is,  of  course,  much  longer.  If  this  were 
not  so,  the  Edison  Company  could  not  afford  a  3-year  guarantee.  The  extra 
.  °J  t‘le  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  as  much  an  advantage  to  the  customer 
as  it  is  to  the  company  making  the  guarantee. 

The  maintenance  of  storage  batteries  in  heavy-duty  trucks  has  been  estimated 
by  truck  manufacturers  at  109  per  cent,  per  annum.  This  prohibitive  and 
destructive  depreciation  has  been  eliminated  by  Mr.  Edison’s  eight  years  of 
unremitting  work  on  the  storage-battery  question. 

To-day  the  pleasure  vehicle  or  truck  manufacturer,  as  well  as  his  customer, 
can  count  upon  his  battery  as  being  an  investment  and  not  a  running  expense. 


EDISON  BATTERY  POINTS : 


1nyl  _  Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

104  Lakeside  Avenue  Orange,  N.  J. 


Mr.  Edison’s  8  Years’  Work 


Sth  Year’s  Work 


EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY  “COUPONS” 


Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

Lakeside  Avenue,  Orange,  N.  J. 


“Is  it  going  to  take  a  quarter  of  a  century  to  electrify  commercial 
transportation  on  highways  and  to  popularize  the  electric  pleasure 
vehicle?  Not  if  the  central  station  knows  its  business.  *  *  *" 


New  Edison 
Storage  Battery 

has  done  more  to  popularize  the  electric  pleasure  vehicle  than  any¬ 
thing  else  since  the  beginning  of  the  industry.  Before  the  arrival  of 
the  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  sixty-five  miles  was  a  good,  day’s 
work  on  a  single  charge  for  an  electric  pleasure  vehicle.  Vehicles 
equipped  with  the  new  Edison.  Storage  Battery  are  to-day  giving 
from  ioo  to  130  miles,  and  even  better,  on  a  single  charge,  and 
they  can  be  run  to  complete  discharge  without  injury. 

And  what  the  Edison  is  doing  in  the  pleasure  vehicle  field 
it  is  duplicating  in  the  commercial  vehicle  field-^it  has  made  the 
electric  truck  practical. 

The  Edison  is  different.  '  There  is  no  lead  or  acid  in  its  con¬ 
struction.  It  is  iron  and  nickel  in  caustic  potash.  Its  weight,  per 
capacity,  is  just  about  half  that  of  the  ordinary  lead  battery. 
There  is  no  depreciation  as  in  the  lead  battery.  On  the  contrary, 
after  the  first  25  or  thirty  discharges  there  is  an  actual  increase  of 
25  to  30  per  cent  in  capacity. 

The  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  the  biggest  thing  in 
sight  for  you  to  increase  your  off-peak  load  and 
bring  home  the  extra  profit.  Boost  Edison  Stor¬ 
age  Battery  Equipment  in  the  vehicles  your  cus¬ 
tomers  buy. 

Edison  Storage  Battery  Co.,  i06  Lakeside  Ave.,  Orange,  N.  J. 


Automobile  battery  charging  provides  an  almost  ideal  off- 
peak  load  on  account  of  its  steadiness  and  continuity.  The 
volume  of  business  which  a  single  electric  truck  furnishes 
for  the  central  station  in  the  course  of  a  year  is  well  worth 
securing,  and  at  a  rate  which  a  tracts  the  service.  *  * 

*  *  Even  a  small  company  ought  to  soon  reach 

the-  point  where  its  income  from  electric  vehicles  is  from 
$j,ooo  to  $10,000  a  year.”  — From  the  Central  Station. 


New  Edison 
Storage  Battery 

is  the  battery  equipment  you  should  recommend  to 
every- electric  vehicle  purchaser 

On  account  of  the  greater  mileage  of  the  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  much  more 
current  will  be  sold. 

There  will  be  more  electric  vehicles  on  the  road  this  year  than  ever  before  in  the 
history  of  the  industry— thanks  to  the  Edison  Storage  Battery.  There  will  be  more  new  electric 
vehicles  equipped  witn  the  Edison  Stotage  Battery  than  equipped  with  batteries  of  any 
other  one  make— and  they  will  be  the  cars  that  will  stay  “in  commission”  all  the  year  round. 

The  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  practically  fool-proof.  You  don’t  have  to  make 
an  electrical  expert  of  every  purchaser  of  an  electric  vehicle  if  the  car  he  buys  is  equipped 
with  the  Edison.  The  Edison  is  not  injured  by  overcharging  nor  by  too  rapid  discharge, 
nor  even  by  complete  discharge.  It  is  not  injured  by  standing  idle  for  any  length  of  time, 
either  charged  or  discharged. 

One  of  the  biggest  arguments  for  the  electric  vehicle  over  the  gasoline  vehicle  is  the 
little  care  the  electric  requires— its  extreme  simplicity.  This  argument  is  true  of  the 
electric  vehicle  equipped  with  the  Edison  Storage  Battery— and  it  is  not  true  of  the  vehicle 
equipped  with  the  lead  battery  which  requires  as  much  knowledge  and  care  and  attention 
as  a  gasoline  motor— and  in  spile  of  which  care  and  attention  the  lead  battery  deteriorates, 
while  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  actually  increases  in  capacity  over  the  same  period. 

The  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  doing  more  to  boost  your  game 
and  bring  home  an  off-peaK  profit  than  anything  else  in  the  electric 
vehicle  field.  It’s  up  to  you  to  boost  for  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  as 
equipment  for  every  electric  vehicle  purchased  in  your  vicinity. 


Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

106  Lakeside  Ave.,  Orange,  N.  J. 


The  same  electric  motor  which  has  made  modern 
street  railways  successful  would  make  electric  vehicles 
successful — with  a  light,  fool-proof,  powerful  battery 
behind  it. 

The  motor  is  all  right,  the  electric  wagon  is  all  right — - 
the  battery  has  been  the  weak  spot. 

Horses  are  more  handicapped  in  drawing  wagons  than 
they  were  when  drawing  street-cars,  because  the  horse- 
cars  ran  on  smooth  steel  ways,  while  wagons  run  on 
the  rough  road  ways. 

If  the  power  had  been  ready  to  back  up  the  electric 
motor  20  years  ago,  the  K.W.  hours  consumed  by 
electric  trucks  would  today  total  more  than  the  whole 
street  railway  output  of  electrical  energy. 

Impossible? 

No;  statistics  show  that  not  only  does  the  truck  business 
exceed  in  tonnage  the  street  railway  business— and  on 
rough  roads  that  require  more  power  to  run  it — but  the 
number  of  tons  transported  by  horses  in  the  United 
States  is  2i£  times  the  number  of  tons  moved  by  all 
the  steam  railroads— tons,  of  course,  not  ton-miles. 


pi.  r»  The  Edison  Storage  Battery 

Edison  Battery  with  its  light  weight,  great 
Pnintc  power  and  ability  to  deliver 

*  uuub  that  power  down  to  a  complete 

'‘tffih?  mi"1'  pou"d  °* 8  "ll  6  discharge  of  the  battery,  clears 

k  iKWir  double  tha  Ww.r  tor  it,,  the  way  by  removing  the  only 
OTIUo"  oi .  ceii  win  not  in.  objection  to  the  use  of  electrics 
Tb-y«  iruarnntee  (or  truck  .mi  weson  for  both  pleasure  and  business 

No  lead!* no  .clj-con.eouently-no  ecld  pUrpOSCS. 


Edison  Battery 
Points 


Nin liMe^^'VoLTwHh  • 


A  3-year  guarantee  given  by 
this  Company  has  such  a  large 
factor  of  safety  behind  it  that 
the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
may  well  be  considered  an 
investment,  not  a  running 
expense. 


sss"'s?ikot%F'3CStArE 


Edison  Storage  Battery  Company 

104  Lakeside  Avenue,  Orange,  N.  J. 


THE  EDISON 
STORAGE  BATTERY 


Contents 

Page 

Foreword  ------ 

5 

Definitions  ------ 

6 

General  Description  - 

8 

Charging  Requisites  - 

10 

Charging 

12 

Discharge  ------ 

16 

Output  and  Efficiency  -  -  -  - 

17 

Incidental  Considerations  -  -  - 

19 

Temperature  ----- 

21 

Filling  ------- 

22 

Cleaning  ------ 

25 

Electrolyte . - , 

26 

Retaining  Cans  -  -  -  -  - 

28 

Connectors  -  -  -  - 

28 

Trays  ------- 

30 

Most  Important  Facts  to  be  Remembered 

31 

( 

Shipment  -  -  - 

ii 

L _ : _ _ 

32 

THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Foreword 

IN  the  following  pages  we  have  endeavored 
to  set  forth  as  clearly  and  concisely  as  pos¬ 
sible  useful  hints  and  information  relating  to  the 
care  and  operation  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery. 

This  Battery  is  built  of  durable  materials  of 
the  highest  grade  and  the  rugged  beauty  of  its 
design  is  absolutely  unique  and  not  attainable 
in  any  other  battery.  The  care  necessary  to 
obtain  the  best  of  service,  together  with  a  very 
long  life,  is  of  a  simple  nature,  and  we  are 
confident  that  the  layman,  by  following  our 
instructions,  will  obtain  most  satisfactory  results. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Definitions 

Battery  A  group  of  any  number  of  cells  connected 
together  and  used  for  one  general  purpose. 

Tray  A  wooden  frame  having  convenient  hard 

rubber  insulators  in  which  cells  are  held  firmly 
•  in  position  and  mutually  insulated. 

Cell  The  unit  of  a  battery,  consisting  of  the 

positive  electrode  and  the  negative  electrode 
assembled  in  the  retaining  can  with  the  neces¬ 
sary  internal  insulators  and  the  electrolyte. 

Retaining  The  nickel-plated  receptacle  in  which  the 

Can  electrodes  and  electrolyte  are  contained. 

Positive  A  group  of  nickel  plates — that  is,  plates  con- 

Electrode  the  nickel  active  material — assembled 

in  multiple  and  connecting  with  the  positive 
pole  of  the  cell. 

Negative  A  group  of  iron  plates— that  is,  plates  con- 

Electrode  taining  the  iron  active  material — assembled 
in  multiple  and  connecting  with  the  negative 
pole  of  the  cell. 


Electro-  The  liquid  in  which  the  electrodes  are 
*yte  immersed,  consisting  of  a  solution  of  pure 
potassium  hydrate  in  distilled  water. 

Tubes  The  round  perforated  metal  retainers,  loaded 
with  nickel  active  material,  which,  when 
secured  in  a  grid,  compose  a  positive  plate. 

Pockets  The  flat  perforated  metal  retainers,  loaded 
with  iron  active  material,  which,  when  secured 
in  a  grid,  compose  a  negative  plate. 

Gas  Valve  A  mounting  on  the  cell-cover,  which  per- 

Separator  f°rms  the  function  of  allowing  gas  to  escape 
freely,  but  prevents  the  ingress  of  any  gas, 
liquid,  or  solid,  from  the  outside.  It  also  acts 
as  a  separator,  freeing  the  escaping  gas  of  the 
fine  spray  of  electrolyte  which  it  would  other¬ 
wise  carry  out,  and  returning  this  to  the  main 
body  of  the  solution. 

Filling  The  opening  at  the  top  of  a  cell,.,  through 
Aperture  ^ich  electrolyte  is  introduced  and  distilled 
water  is  added.  This  vent  is  normally  closed 
by  a  gas-tight  spring  cap. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


General  Description 

IN  appearance  the  new  “A”  type  of  cell  (to  which  this 
booklet  relates)  resembles  closely  the  old  “E”  type, 
the  only  radical  change  being  in  the  construction  of 
the  nickel  or  positive  plate.  Formerly,  flat  rectangular 
pockets  were  used  for  retaining  both  the  nickel  and  the 
iron  active  materials.  These  are  still  used  for  the  iron, 
but  for  the  nickel  material  round  tubes  J^-inch  in 
diameter  and  4%  inches  long  are  now  used.  A  positive 
plate  contains  thirty  (30)  of  these  tubes  placed  in  a  ver¬ 
tical  position  in  two  rows,  and  held  securely  in  place  by 
a  steel  supporting  grid. 

The  tube  itself  is  made  of  thin  perforated  steel  which, 
when  filled  with  active  material  and  properly  bound  by 
small  steel  rings,  makes  expansion  of  the  active  material 
impossible,  and  thereby  insures  perfect  internal  contacts. 
A  great  improvement  has  also  been  made  in  the  nickel 
active  material,  by  substituting  electro-chemically  pre¬ 
pared  flakes  of  pure  nickel  metal  in  place  of  the  flake 
graphite,  which  was  formerly  used,  to  increase  the  con¬ 
ductivity  of  the  active  mass.  In  this  new  cell  also  are 
embodied-  a  number  of  minor  improvements  which 
facilitate  the  handling  to  a  great  extent.  All  of  these 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


changes  in  construction  are  the  direct  result  of  practical 
experience. 

A  cell  derives  its  type  number  from  the  number  of 
positive  plates  contained  therein;  e.  g.,  an  “A-4”  cell 
contains  four  positive  or  nickel  plates. 

A  polarity  mark  is  stamped  in  the  cover  of  every  cell 
alongside  of  the  positive  pole.  The  unmarked  pole,  of 
course,  is  negative. 

Following  are  the  cell  dimensions  in  inches,  and 
weights  in  pounds: 


“A-4” 

“A-6” 

“A-8” 

Width  of  can  (outside) 

2* 

2% 

4% 

Breadth  of  can  “ 

s% 

5% 

s% 

Height  of  can  “ 

12% 

12% 

12% 

Height  of  cell  to  top  of  pole 

(not  assembled) 

13 % 

13 % 

13% 

Required  height  of  battery 

compartment 

IS 

.15 

IS 

Weight  of  complete  cell 

13.5 

19.2 

25.2 

THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Charging  Requisites 

STORAGE  batteries  cannot  be  charged  with  alter¬ 
nating  current;  the  current  must  in  all  cases  be 
“direct.” 

When  the  only  available  charging  source  is  an  alter¬ 
nating  current  circuit,  it  can  be  changed  into  direct  cur¬ 
rent  by  means  of  either  a  motor-generator  set  or  a  mer¬ 
cury-arc  rectifier.  We  recommend  the  latter  where  oniy 
one  battery  is  to  be  charged,  on  account  of  its  lower  cost 
and  good  efficiency.  Where  a  number  of  batteries  are 
to  be  charged  at  one  time  a  motor-generator  set  of 
sufficient  capacity  is  more  economical. 

To  maintain  the  normal  rate  throughout  the  charge, 
the  line  voltage  must  average  at  least  1.85  times  the 
number  of  cells  in  series.  For  example,  to  charge  sixty 
cells  in  series  it  would  be  necessary  to  have  a-  line  voltage 
of  60  times  1.85  volts,  or  111  volts. 

The  following  table  shows  the  voltage  necessary  to 
charge  various  numbers  of  cells  at  normal  rate: 

20  cells  require  line  voltage  of  37.  Volts. 

30  “  “  “  “  55.5  “ 

40  “  “  “  “  “  74.  “ 

cn  “  “  “  “  “  92.?  “ 


60  cells  require  line  voltage  of  111.  Volts. 

70  “  “  “  “  “  130.  “ 

80  “  “  “  “  “  148.  “ 

If  the  line  voltage  be  2%  or  3%  lower  than  that  speci¬ 
fied  in  the  table  it  will  not  interfere  materially  with  the 
charge,  the  only  difference  it  will  make  being  at  the  end 
of  the  charge,  at  which  time  it  will  be  impossible  to 
maintain  the  normal  rate.  A  battery  of  60  cells  can  be 
charged  very  satisfactorily  on  the  universal  direct  current 
line  of  110  volts. 

A  higher  line  voltage  than  that  specified  can,  of  course, 
be  used  by  the  employment  of  a  suitable  resistance. 

In  the  majority  of  cases  batteries  are  charged  on  a 
direct,  current  line  of  a  fixed  voltage,  in  which  case  it  is 
necessary  to  have  a  rheostat  (preferable  of  the  iron  grid 
type),  or  some  other  suitable  resistance,  in  series  with  the 
battery.  This  is  usually  mounted  on  the  switchboard. 

This  rheostat  or  resistance  will  enable  one  to  regulate 
at  will  the  number  of  amperes  flowing.  As  the  charge 
progresses  it  will  be  found  necessary  to  keep  cutting  out 
resistance  in  order  to  maintain  a  fixed  rate. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Charging 

EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERIES  are  shipped 
in  a  discharged  condition,  and  must  be  charged 
fifteen  hours  at  the  normal  rate  before  using. 

This  overcharge  should  be  repeated  after  every  12  or 
IS  complete  discharges  or  the  equivalent  thereof,  until  4 
overcharges  have  been  given;  thereafter  a  battery  should 
be  overcharged  about  once  in  two  months. 


The  normal  charge-rate  of  the  “A-4”  type  is  30  am¬ 
peres;  of  the  “A-6”  type  45  amperes,  and  of  the  “A-8” 
type  60  amperes.  < 

The  normal  rate  may  be  maintained  throughout  the 
charge.  It  is  not  necessary,  under  ordinary  circum¬ 
stances,  to  cut  down  or  diminish  the  rate  as  the  charge 
progresses;  but  this  should  be  done  when  the  heating  is 
excessive. 


Charging  may  be  done  at  double  the  normal  rate  for 
a  one-hour  boost. 

If  the  charging  voltage  available  is  such  that  the 
normal  rate  cannot  be  maintained,  the  battery  may  be 
charged  at  a  lower  rate  for  a  longer  length  of  time. 

Very  low  charge  rates  are  not  good.  The  minimum 
rate  that  should  be  maintained  throughout  a  charge  is  20 
amperes  for  the  “A-4”  type  of  cell;  30  amperes  for  the 
“A-60”  type,  and  40  amperes  for  the  “A-8”  type. 
Toward  the  end  of  a  charge  the  rate  may  be  cut  down  to 
one-third  the  normal. 

A  seven-hour  charge  at  normal  rate  is  taken  as  a  normal 
charge.  But  this  is  not  fixed,  and  the  length  of  charge 
may  be  varied  from  4  to  10  hours  at  normal  rate,  accord¬ 
ing  to  the  amount  of  work  to  be  done,  as  explained 
under  “Output  and  Efficiency,”  on  page  17. 

It  will  be  seen  by  the  characteristic  charge  curve  that 
the  voltage  of  an  Edison  Storage  Battery  has,  a  general 
tendency  upward  during  charge  although  it  may  re¬ 
coil  a  few  points  in  the  first  hour  or  two.  When  the 
state  of  full  charge  is  reached  the  voltage  assumes  a  con¬ 
stant  value.  It  is  therefore  possible,  after  some  experi¬ 
ence,  to  determine  when  a  battery  is  charged  by  making 
careful  observations  of  its  voltage.  No  absolute  figure 
can  be  given  for  the  full-charge  voltage,  as  this  is  varied 
by  the  battery  temperature,  condition  of  the  electrolyte. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


etc. ;  but  under  normal  conditions  the  voltage  across  the 
battery  terminals  at  the  end  of  charge  will  average  1.80 
to  1.8S  volts  per  cell  at  the  normal  current  rate. 

As  a  general  rule  it  may  be  said  that  a  battery  is  prac¬ 
tically  charged  when — all  conditions  being  normal — the 
voltage  has  exceeded  1.8  volts  per  cell  and  has  remained 
constant  for  a  period  of  30  to  40  minutes. 

The  difficulty  in  charging  by  voltage  is  that  under 
certain  conditions  the  voltage  may  rise  to  an  abnormal 
value  early  in  the  charge  and  mislead  one  into  thinking 
that  the  state  of  full  charge  has  been  reached.  When 
this  abnormal  rise  occurs  it  will  be  noticeable  during  the 
first  hour  or  two  of  charge,  and  is  usually  followed  by  a 
dropping  back  to  normal  voltage,  so  that,  with  a  little 
experience,  one  can  easily  recognize  this  false  indication 
and  ignore  it. 

Overcharging  is  not  harmful,  but  necessitates  frequent 
filling  of  cells,  wastes  current  and  is  apt  to  cause  excessive 
heating.  For  these  reasons  it  should  not  be  made  a 
practice  of  except  at  the  intervals  recommended,  or 
occasionally  when  an  extra  long  discharge  is  desired. 

The  output  will  not  be  so  good  if  the  temperature 
during  charge  is  below  70°  Fahr.;  but  the  nearer  the 
temperature  can  be  kept  to  this  minimum  figure  the 
better  will  be  the  results,  both  as  to  immediate  output 
and  life. 


When  a  battery  has  remained  idle  for  a  considerable 
length  of  time  the  first  charge  before  going  into  service 
should  be  long. 

Never  hold  a  lighted  match  or  any  naked  flame  near 
a  battery  while  it  is  charging  or  immediately  afterwards, 
as  an  explosion  of  the  evolved  gases  might  ensue. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Discharge 


THE  normal  discharge  rates  are  the  same  as  the 
normal  charge  rates,  viz.,  “A-4”  30  amperes, 
“A-6”  45  amperes,  “A-8”  60  amperes. 

The  average  discharge  voltage  of  any  type,  working 
at  its  normal  rate,  is  1.2  volts  per  cell,  and  the  discharge 
is  practically  complete  when  ah  average  of  one  volt  per 
cell  is  reached. 


It  is  permissable  to  discharge  a  batteiy  continuously 
at  rates  up  to  25%  above  normal;  but  this  should  be 
avoided  if  possible,  on  account  of  the  loss  of  voltage  and 
increase  of  heating  caused  thereby. 

For  occasional  short  intervals  of  time,  as  in  climbing 
hills  or  starting  on  heavy  roads,  no  harm  will  result  if 
the  rate  be  increased  to  three  or  four  times  the  normal. 


i 


1 


| 


] 

1 


Output  and  Efficiency 

f  I  'VHE  rated  normal  outputs  of  cells  are  as  follows: 

|  “A-4”  150  ampere-hours,  “A-6”  225  ampere- 

hours,  “A-8”  300  ampere-hours. 

The  capacity  of  an  Edison  Storage  Battery  increases 
for  some  time  after  it  has  been  put  into  service.  A 
battery  will  give  not  less  than  the  rated  output  when 
new,  if  charged  normally;  but  after  working  some  time 
it  will  have  better  efficiency  and  will  give  a  greater 
output. 

This  process  of  self-forming  continues  over  a  period 
of  from  one  to  three  months  of  regular  service,  depend¬ 
ing  on  the  conditions;  and  it  is  partly  to  assist  in  this 
forming-up  that  overcharges  must  be  given  at  intervals, 
as  recommended  under  “Charging,”  on  page  12. 

A  properly  formed  battery,  besides  having,  higher 
capacity,  will  have  a  longer  life  than  one  riot  properly 
treated.  It  is  therefore  very  important  to  the  user,  as  a 
matter  of  ultimate  economy,  to  follow  closely  our  in¬ 
structions  as  to  overcharging. 

A  valuable  feature  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
is  that  it  always  has  a  reserve  capacity,  which  may 
be  utilized  when  necessary  by  extending  the  length 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


of  charge.  The  highest  practical  limit  of  output  will  be 
reached  when  a  battery  is  charged  ten  hours,  at  the 
normal  rate;  and  its  value  will  be,  for  a  fully-formed 
battery,  perhaps  30%  more  than  the  rated  output.  ' f  ' 

Inside  of  this  maximum  working  limit  it  is  optional  J 

with  the  user  as  to  the  length  of  charge  he  shall  employ, 
and  this  should  be  regulated  according  to  the  output  re¬ 
quired  in  any  particular  service. 

It  should  be  borne  in  mind,  however,  that  in  utilizing 
the  highest  available  capacity  of  a  battery,  efficiency  is 
sacrificed;  that  is,  charging  current  is  wasted.  The  wasted 
current  goes  to  decompose  water  which  escapes  as  gas,  (j 

and  consequently  distilled  water  must  be  added  to  the  f 

cells  more  frequently  than  under  normal  conditions.  ' 

Long  charges  also  are  likely  to  cause  excessive  heating, 
and  care  should  be  taken  to  keep  this  within  the  pre¬ 
scribed  limits. 

On  the  other  hand,  if  very  high  output  is  not  required, 

and  a  battery  will  do  its  work  when  charged  say  4  to  7 
hours  at  normal  rate,  the  current  efficiency  will  be  very 
high,  and  filling  will  not  have  to  be  attended  to  so  fre-  $ 

quently,  while  the  amount  of  heating  will  be  small.  j 

A  seven-hour  charge  at  normal  rate  is  arbitrarily  . 

chosen  as  the  normal  charge,  the  reason  being  that  under 
these  conditions  the  highest  output  obtainable  with  little 
sacrifice  of  efficiency  is  realized. 


Incidental 

Considerations 

LACK  of  capacity  in  a  battery  may  be  due  to 
i  grounds  between  cans  or  through  the  supporting 
structure;  to  low  temperature,  as  on  a  cold 
winter  day;  to  depletion  of  potash  in  the  electrolyte;  or 
to  carbonation  of  the  potash. 

Grounds  are  best  avoided  by  following  closely  the 
directions  as  to  “Cleaning,”  on  page  25,  and  by 
taking  care  that  retaining  cans  do  not  get  together  by 
any  chance  and  that  nothing  of  a  metalic  nature  gets 
between  them. 

Depletion  of  the  electrolyte  is  brought  about  princi¬ 
pally  by  improper  filling  of  cells,  for,  when  the  solution 
is  too  high  above  the  plates,  it  is  liable  to  be  forced  out 
in  bubbles  by  the  escaping  gas. 

Carbonation  comes  from  the  use  of  water  which  has 
been  exposed  to  the  air  and  has  absorbed  carbon  dioxide 
from  it,  or  which  has  become  carbonated  in  some 
other  way. 

Depletion  of  electrolyte  can  be  detected  by  specific 
gravity  readings,  but  the  amount  of  carbonation  can  only 
be  determined  by  a  chemical  analysis.  Both  of  these 


troubles  are  remedied  by  a  complete  renewal  of  electro¬ 
lyte,  which  should  be  done,  anyway,  every  eight  to  ten 
months,  as  explained  under  “Electrolyte,”  on  page  26. 


Temperature 


If  it  should  be  found,  in  taking  a  specific  gravity 
reading,  that  the  electrolyte  in  any  cell  is  much  weaker 
than  the  average,  this  cell  should  be  examined  for  a 
possible  leak.  If  a  cell  is  found  to  be  leaky  it  can  be  put 
in  a  new  retaining  can  at  our  factory. 

The  Edison  Storage  Battery  may  be  allowed  to  stand 
in  a  discharged  condition  any  length  of  time  without 
injury,  and,  in  fact,  it  is  much  better  that  it  should  be 
discharged  than  charged  when  left  to  stand. 

A  battery  can  be  put  out  of  commission  indefinitely  if 
care  is  taken  to  see  that  the  outside  of  the  retaining  cans 
are  left  clean  and  dry,  and  that  the  cells  are  in  a  dis¬ 
charged  condition.  It  should  be  stored  in  a  dry  place, 
and  will  require  no  attention  other  than  an  inspection 
once  in  two  or  three  months  to  make  sure  the  solution 
is  kept  at  the  proper  height. 

Do  not  put  heavy  weights  on  top  of  cells  or  stand  on 
them,  as  a  permanent  injury  may  be  done. 


THE  best  results  are  obtained  from  a  battery  when 
the  temperature  is  kept  between  75°  and  95° 
Fahr.  during  charge.  For  this  reason  it  is  advis¬ 
able  to  have  the  garage  reasonably  warm  in  winter  and 
well  ventilated  in  summer. 

The  battery  compartment  should  always  be  kept  open  while 
battery  is  charging.  All  holes  or  openings  in  battery  com¬ 
partment  should  be  sealed  or  closed  tightly  during  the 
cold  winter  months,  so  that  the  cells  will  retain  their 
heat  while  out  on  the  road. 

The  temperature  of  a  battery  should  not  be  allowed  to 
go  above  105°  Fahr.  during  charge,  or  115°  during  dis¬ 
charge. 

The  lower  the  temperature  is  kept  (within  the  pre¬ 
scribed  limits)  during  charging,  the  longer  will  be  the 
life  of  the  battery.  -V-i.  j-  ; 

In  hot  weather  the  temperature  can  be  kept  down 
during  charge  by  the  use  of  an  ordinary  desk  fan  blowing 
on  the  battery. 

When  the  temperature  of  a  battery  falls  below  50° 
Fahr.  during  either  charge  or  discharge,  the  output  and 
efficiency  will  be  temporarily  impaired. 


Connect  rubber  tube  to  valve  at  bottom  of  tank. 

Test  filler  before  using,  by  making  connection  with  a 
piece  of  metal  or  a  wire  between  the  metal  sleeve  A  and 
the  steel  tube  B.  If  bell  rings  when  this  is  done  the  filler 
is  O.  K, 

Insert  filler  in  opening  of  cell  as  far  as  it  will  go,  taking 
care  to  see  that  the  metal  sleeve  A  rests  firmly  on  rim  of 
filler  opening,  thereby  insuring  contact. 

Press  down  on  wire  lever  on  top  of  filler.  This  opens 
valve. 

When  bell  rings  the  solution  has  reached  the  proper 
height. 

Release  valve  and  remove  filler. 

If  the  bell  does  not  ring  when  a  cell  is  properly  filled 
it  is  an  indication  of  a  weak  potash  solution,  or  that  solu¬ 
tion  was  so  low  in  cells  that  the  fresh  water  added  has  not 
had  time  to  become  thoroughly  mixed;  or  it  may  be  that 
the  bell  is  out  of  adjustment,  or  that  the  dry  cells  are 
worn  out. 

Do  not  use  die  storage  battery  being  filled  to  furnish 
current  in  place  of  dry  cells,  as  short-circuiting  will 
result. 

Do  not 


Cleaning 


rTyHE  outside  of  the  retaining  cans  should  be  kept  clean 
J-  and  dry. 

If  dirt  is  allowed  to  accumulate  between  the  cells 
it  is  liable  to  become  moist  with  water  and  potash 
and  an  electrolytic  action  will  result,  which  in  time  may 
corrode  the  retaining  cans. 

If  the  retaining  cans  become  corroded  or  rusted  they 
should  be  coated  on  the  sides  and  bottoms  with  vaseline. 
It  is  not  advisable  to  vaseline  tops  of  cells. 

For  a  thorough  cleaning,  cells  should  be  taken  out  of 
the  trays,  washed  off  and  dried.  The  trays  should  be 
cleaned  and  dried  thoroughly  before  reassembling  the 
cells  in  same. 

The  block  insulators  or  rubber  aprons  on  which  the 
cells  rest  should  always  be  cleaned  and  coated  with 
vaseline  before  reassembling.  .  ' 

Vaseline  will  not  adhere  to  the  retaining  can  if  the 
retaining  can  is  moist. 


leave  distilled  water  in  filler-tank  when 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Electrolyte 

THE  Electrolyte  in  an  Edison  Storage  Battery 
is  a  21%  solution  of  Potash  (KOH,),  containing 
a  small  amount  of  Lithium.  Both  of  these  in¬ 
gredients  are  alkaline. 

Never  under  any  condition  put  acid  in  the  cells. 

The  normal  specific  gravity  of  a  21%  solution  of 
Potash  is  1.200. 

The  efficiency  and  capacity  of  a  cell  is  not  affected  to 
any  great  extent  until  the  specific  gravity  falls  below 
1.160.  If  the  specific  gravity  is  allowed  to  fall  below  1.160 
a  temporary  effect  will  be  noticed  in  output. 

The  specific  gravity  does  not  change  during  charge 
or  discharge. 

If  specific  gravity  readings  are  taken  they  should  be 
made  at  the  end  of  a  charge,  by  which  time  the  distilled 
water  used  in  filling  will  have  had  ample  time  to  mix 
thoroughly. 

The  solution  in  an  Edison  Storage  Battery  in  daily 
operation  should  be  changed  every  eight  or  ten  months — 
the  old  solution  emptied  out  and  new  solution  put  in. 
After  pouring  out  the  old  solution  fill  immediately  with 
the  new,  being  careful  not  to  allow  the  cell  to  stand 
empty  for  more  than  a  few  minutes. 


Special  potash  solution  for  refilling  may  be  obtained 
from  us.  It  requires  about  1000  cubic  centimeters  or 
2.64  pounds  to  refill  an  “A-4”  cell,  1500  cubic  centi¬ 
meters  or  3.96  pounds  to  refill  an  “A-6”  cell,  and  200,000 
cubic  centimeters  or  5.28  pounds  to  refill  an  “A-8”  cell. 

This  new  solution  is  shipped  from  the  factory  in  iron 
drums.  By  elevating  the  drum  the  solution  can  readily 
be  siphoned  directly  into  the  cells,  thus  eliminating  the 
necessity  of  handling  it. 

The  special  filling  apparatus  should  not  be  used  for 
refilling  cells  with  new  electrolyte. 

In  case  where  the  specific  gravity  falls  below  1.160  it 
is  advisable  to  renew  the  whole  electrolyte  rather  than 
add  potash  solution,  as  by  adding  potash  the  solution  is 
liable  to  be  made  too  strong,  with  the  possibility  that 
permanent  injury  will  result. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Retaining  Cans 

THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY  cell  is 
encased  in  a  thin  steel  retaining  can. 

This  can  is  corrugated  on  the  sides,  pressed  up 
and  the  seams  welded.  It  is  impossible  to  remove  the 
cover  without  ruining  the  can.  In  view  of  the  fact  that 
there  is  no  deposit  it  is  not  necessary,  after  a  cell  is  once 
assembled  at  our  factory,  to  get  at  the  inside. 

The  retaining  can  is  plated  heavily,  inside  and  out, 
with  nickel.  This  nickel-plating  by  a  special  process  is 
fused  into  the  steel,  and  once  in  place  forms  a  very 
effective  protection  against  rust  and  corrosion. 

If  the  can  is  kept  clean  and  dry  it  will  last  for  years. 
The  potash  solution  has  no  injurious  effect  upon  it. 

Connectors 

THE  connectors  used  on  an  Edison  Storage  Battery 
consist  of  three  parts,  namely  the  two  terminal 
lugs  and  a  connecting  piece  of  copper  wire. 

The  copper  wire  is  fitted  into  the  lugs  and  the  whole 
swedged  together. 

The  inside  of  the  lug  is  drilled  out  and  reamed  on  a 
taper,  and  when  placed  in  position  over  the  binding  post 


and  secured  by  means  of  a  nut,  forms  a  very  superior 
connection.  As  a  precaution,  however,  it  is  advisable  to 
make  a  regular  inspection  of  connectors.  This  should 
be  done  a  short  time  before  the  end  of  a  charge  by  going 
over  and  feeling  of  same.  A  hot  connector  should  be 
taken  off  and  the  inside  of  the  lug,  as  well  as  the  cell 
pole,  cleaned  thoroughly.  If  a  hot  connector  is  caused 
by  a  defective  contact  between  the  copper  wire  and  the 
lug  itshould  be  taken  off  and  a  new  connector  substituted. 

A  special  tool,  known  as  a  disconnecting  jack,  is 
shipped  with  every  battery.  This  tool  is  designed  for 
removing  connectors. 

To  disconnect,  take  the  nut  from  the  top  of  the  pole, 
place  the  projections  of  the  jack  under  the  encircling  rim 
on  top  of  the  lug  and  screw  down  on  the  main  screw. 
Connectors  can  be  taken  off  readily  in  this  manner. 

After  the  first  few  charges  and  discharges  it  is  advis¬ 
able  to  go  over  the  pole  nuts  and  tighten  same  with  the 
socket  wrench.  We  supply  a  special  socket  wrench  for 
tightening  and  removing  the  nuts. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Trays 

THE  tray  in  which  the  cells  are  assembled  is  a  very 
decided  improvement  over  the  kind  used  hereto¬ 
fore,  embodying  as  it  does  a  very  novel  feature. 
Where  formerly  a  dovetail  joint  was  used  on  the  corners, 
the  wood  strips  are  now  one  continuous  piece,  the  cor¬ 
ners  being  bent.  This  makes  a  very  light  tray  of  great 
strength. 

Trays  are  dipped  in  a  special  insulating  and  protecting 
composition  before  leaving  our  factory. 

As  a  protection  to  the  wood,  and  also  to  prevent  any 
possible  loss  of  current,  trays  should  be  kept  dry. 

Following  are  the  lengths  in  inches  of  the  different 
sizes  of  trays: 

“A-4"  “A-6”  “A-8” 

2-cell  Tray  7 #  10  12*4 

3  “  “  10#  14#  18# 

4  "  “  14  18#  24# 

S  "  “  17*  23  29f| 

6  “  "  20*  27#  35# 

7  “  “  23*  31# 

8  “  “  26H  35# 

9  “  "  30 

10  “  “  33# 

All  trays  are  6%  inches  wide. 

Clearance,  or  height  of  compartment,  required — 
15  inches. 


The  Most 


Important  Fads 
To  Be  Remembered 

USE  only  pure  distilled  water  for  filling. 

Never  allow  the  solution  to  get  below  the  tops 
of  the  plates. 

Do  not  fill  more  than  one-half  inch  above  the  plates. 
Keep  cells  as  cool  as  possible  during  charge,  but  not 
cooler  than  60°  to  70°  Fahr. 

In  winter  keep  cells  warm  while  on  the  road,  by 
closing  up  tightly  the  battery  compartment. 

Be  careful  to  keep  all  connections  clean  and  in  good 
contact. 

Keep  the  cells  and  trays  dry  and  clean  at  all  times. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Shipment 

ALL  prices  are  f.  o.  b.  Orange,  N.  J. 

Batteries  are  shipped  assembled  in  trays  with  all 
necessary  insulators  and  connectors  in  position. 
Care  should  be  taken  in  unpacking  not  to  upset  the 
crate,  as  cells  are  properly  filled  with  solution  before 
leaving  the  factory,  ready  to  be  installed  and  put  on 
charge. 

On  receipt  of  a  battery  it  is  advisable  to  inspect  cells 
to  make  sure  the  solution  has  not  been  spilled  in  ship- 

Flexible  connectors  for  making  connections  between 
trays  of  cells  are  made  in  different  lengths.  They  should 
be  ordered  with  the  battery. 

Unless  otherwise  ordered  two  terminal  lugs  will  be 
shipped  with  each  battery. 

We  are  not  liable  for  damage  to  goods  in  transit;  our 
responsibility  ceases  when  we  deliver  battery  in  good 
order  to  the  transportation  company.  All  claims  for 
damage  in  transit  must  be  made  against  the  carrier. 


Hu.  EDISON 
STORAGE 
BATTERY 


The  Contents  of  this  Book 


The  New  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  Now  Ready 
Glossary  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
Description  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
Characteristic  Features  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
Commercial  Tests  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 
Advantages  of  Motor  over  Horse  Vehicles 
Advantages  of  Electric  over  Gasoline  Vehicles 
Table  of  Data 
Price  List  of  Cells  and  Parts 


The  New 

Edison  Storage  Battery 
Is  Now  Ready 

THE  original  Edison  Storage  Battery  was  launched  six 
years  ago.  It  was  the  best  storage  battery  which  up 
to  that  time  had  been  produced.  It  eliminated  the 
serious  drawbacks  that  interfered  with  the  successful  opera¬ 
tion  of  the  lead  battery,  the  only  type  of  storage  battery 
popularly  used.  It  was  known  as  Type  E. 

In  his  first  invention  of  a  storage  battery,  Mr.  Edison 
made  a  radical  departure  from  the  working  principles  of  all 
former  batteries.  He  started  fresh,  forgetting  everything 
that  had  hitherto  been  done.  He  saw  at  once  that  batteries 
in  which  lead  was  the  active  material  had  too  many  inherent 
defects  to  ever  realize  the  full  promise  of  electricity  as  a 
motive  power  for  vehicles. 

Mr.  Edison’s  first  battery  was  a  success.  It  was  tried 
out  and  tested  by  disinterested  parties.  It  proved  lighter, 
cleaner  and  cheaper.  The  greater  initial  cost  was  more 
than  offset  by  a  lower  cost  of  upkeep  and  operation.  It  gave 
greater  output  for  the  same  weight,  did  not  deteriorate  when 
left  uncharged,  and  was  not  injured  by  overcharging. 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Those  who  tried  it  were  delighted  with  the  results. 

Over  two  hundred  and  fifty  automobiles  equipped 
with  this  E  type  Edison  Battery  are  now  being  used  for 
delivery  purposes  by  some  of  the  largest  firms  in.  New  York 
and  vicinity.  These  batteries  have  been  in  operation  from 
two  to  five  years,  and  in  almost  every  case  they  have  proven 
superior  to  iead  batteries,  and  have  given  more  economical 
service  than  horses. 

The  cost  of  maintenance  of  over  one  hundred  E  type 
batteries  in  electric  automobiles,  owned  and  operated  by  six 
of  the  largest  business  houses  in  New  York  City,  averaged 
only  $36.90  per  battery-year  during  its  life.  This  includes 
all  expenditures  over  a  period  of  from  three  to  five  years  of 
continuous  service.  The  automobiles,  with  hardly  an  excep¬ 
tion,  did  not  lose  a  day  on  account  of  battery  trouble. 
Nothing  hitherto  produced  in  the  way  of  a  storage  battery 
can  compare  with  this  record  for  economy  and  reliability. 

SO  MUCH  for  the  first  Edison  Battery.  The  results 
would  have  satisfied  anyone  but  an  Edison.  But  Mr. 
Edison  saw  a  great  future  in  the  application  of  the 
storage  battery  to  the  problem  ' of -transportation.  He  also 
saw  that  his  battery  could  be  improved,  and  that  it  must  be 
improved  to  solve  that  problem.  So  he  set  himself  to  work 
to  improve  it. 

But  right  here  he  did  another  characteristic  Edison  thing. 

mm 


'HE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Mr.  Edison  said  “No,”  confined  himself  to  his  labora¬ 
tory,  and  after  six  years  of  persistent  toil  brought  forth  the 
new  Edison  Storage  Battery  of  which  this  booklet  treats. 


AN  INCIDENT  will  give  some  idea  of  the  immense 
/  %  amount  of  patient  study  and  research  required 
to  improve  an  already  good  battery.  Mr.  Edison 
made  nine  thousand  different  experiments  without  obtaining 
the  results  he  wanted.  A  visitor  to  whom  this  was  told 
exclaimed : 

“Then  all  these  experiments  were  practically  wasted.” 

“Not  at  all,”  cried  Mr.  Edison,  leaping  to  his  feet, 
“I  now  know  nine  thousand  things  not  to  do.” 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


There  you  have  the  temper  of  the  man  who  has  made 
a  storage  battery  that  brings  within  easy  reach  a  motive  power 
that  is  going  to  drive  the  many  thousands  of  trucks  and 
delivery  wagons  that  distribute  the  merchandise  of  the  world. 

The  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  as  much  better  than 
the  original  Edison  Battery  as  that  battery  was  better  than 
the  lead  battery. 


THE  possibilities  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  are 
almost  beyond  calculation.  Nearly  every  user  of 
commercial  vehicles  who  has  tried  out  the  electric 
automobile  has  found  it  in  every  way  superior  to  and  more 
satisfactory  than  the  horse-drawn  vehicle.  This  was  true 
in  a  great  many  cases  with  the  lead  battery.  It  was  unques¬ 
tionably  true  of  the  E  Type  Edison  Battery.  It  is  now  placed 
beyond  the  reach  of  argument  or  contradiction  by  the  newly 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


of  its  battery,  and  the  weight  of  the  goods  to  be  delivered. 
The  short  mileage  from  a  single  charge  of  the  batteries 
limited  its  use  considerably. 

But  in  spite  of  this  and  other  drawbacks,  the  use  of 
electrically  driven  wagons  has  increased. 

It  is  certain,  however,  that  with  the  new  Edison  Battery 
it  will  increase  at  an  unheard  of  rate. 


Says  the  Electric  Vehicle  and  Central  Station : 

“Where  electric  trucks  are  shown  to  the  best  advantage  is  in  the 
use  of  a  machine  that  will  at  once  displace  a  4  or  6  horse  team.  This 
affords  a  most  striking  example  of  the  advanced  stage  that  has  been 
attained  in  commercial  city  transportation. 

“This  kind  of  work  means  more  miles  and  quicker  transit  of 


extra  heavy  loads  than  is  possible  with  horse  haulage,  and  a  full  day’s 
work  on  one  charge  of  the  batteries.  The  cost  of  the  battery  charge  is 
less  than  the  cost  of  horse  feed,  and  the  whole  cost  per  ton-mile  about 
one-half  the  real  cost  of  horse  haulage.  The  expense  of  keeping  horses 
is  constant  even  during  Sundays,  holidays  and  slack  periods ;  the  electric 
wagon  immediately  ceases  in  cost  when  at  rest. 

“  When  the  cost  per  ton-mile  is  stated,  it  means  that  all  the  items 
of  interest  on  investment,  depreciation,  repairs  and  maintenance,  insurance, 
labor,  rent,  lubrication,  etc.,  have  been  analyzed  and  the  cost  actually 
compiled  and  compared  from  real  work  performed  by  horse  haulage  and 
electric  delivery. 

“  The  service  distance  day  after  day  is  beyond  the  capacity  of  horse 
haulage,  and  the  simplicity  of  operation  is  such  that  any  man  of  ordinary 
intelligence  can  drive  the  truck  with  greater  ease  than  horses  for  similar 
service.  These  trucks  may  be  equipped  with  electric  hoists  when 


Glossary  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 


BATTERY — A  group  of  any  number  of  cells  connected  together  and  used 
for  one  general  purpose. 


TRAY — A  wooden  frame  having  convenient  hard  rubber  insulators,  in 
which  cells  are  held  firmly  in  position  and  mutually  insulated. 

CELL — The  unit  of  a  battery,  consisting  of  the  positive  electrode  and 
negative  electrode  assembled  in  the  retaining  can  with  the  necessary 
internal  insulators  and  the  electrolyte. 


RETAINING  CAN — The  nickel-plated  receptacle  in  which  the  elec¬ 
trodes  and  electrolyte  are  contained. 


POSITIVE  ELECTRODE — A  group  of  nickel  plates — that  is,  plates 
containing  the  nickel  active  material — assembled  in  multiple,  and 
connecting  with  the  positive  pole  of  the  cell. 

NEGATIVE  ELECTRODE — A  group  of;  iron  plates — that  is,  plates 
containing  the  iron  active  material  —  assembled  in  multiple,  and 
connecting  with  the  negative  pole  of  the  cell. 

ELECTROLYTE — The  liquid  in  which  the  electrodes  are  immersed, 
consisting  of  a  solution  of  pure  potassium  hydrate  in  distilled  water. 

TUBES — The  round,  perforated-metal  retainers  loaded  with  nickel  active 
material,  which,  when  secured  in  a  grid,  compose  a  positive  plate. 

POCKETS — The  flat,  perforated-metal  retainers  loaded  with  iron  active 
material,  which,  when  secured  in  a  grid,  compose  a  negative  plate. 

GAS  VALVE  or  SEPARATOR — A  mounting  on  the  cell  cover,  which 
performs  the  function  of  allowing  gas  to  escape  freely,  but  prevents 
the  ingress  of  any  gas,  liquid,  or  solid}'  from  the  outside.  It  also  acts 
as  a  separator,  freeing  the  escaping  gas  of  the  fine  spray  of  electrolyte 
which  it  would  otherwise  carry  out,  and  returning  this  to  the  main 
body  of  the  solution.  I 


FILLING  APERTURE — The  opening  at  the  top  of  a  cell,  through 
which  electrolyte  is  introduced  and  distilled  water  is  added,  This 
vent  is  normally  closed  by  a  gas-tight  spring,  cap. 


ins 


Description  of  the 
Edison  Storage  Battery 


THIS  description  will  be  brief  and  general.  It  will 
not  go  into  technical  details,  nor  will  it  attempt 
to  describe  the  chemical  reactions  involved.  It  is 
intended  to  enable  anyone  who  has  use  for  a  storage  battery 
to  understand  the  construction  and  the  working  of  our  battery. 

The  new  Edison  Storage  Battery  is  known  as  Type  A. 
It  is  at  present  made  in  two  sizes.  A  cell  having  four  posi¬ 
tive  plates  is  called  A -4;  a  cell  having  six  positive  plates  is 
called,  A-6. 

The  Edison  invention  involves  the  use  of  an  entirely 
new  voltaic  combination  in  an  alkaline  electrolyte,  in  place 
of  the  lead-lead  peroxide  combination  and  acid  electrolyte 
characteristic  of  all  other  commercial  storage  batteries.  This 
not  only  secures  durability  and  greater  output  per  given 
weight  of  battery,  but  eliminates  a  long  list  of  troubles  and 
diseases  inherent  in  the  lead-acid  combination  which  have 
hitherto  hindered  the  full  application  of  the  original  storage 
battery  idea. 

In  the  Edison  Battery  the  active  materials  are  oxides 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


of  nickel  and  of  iron,  respectively  in  the  positive  and  negative 
electrodes,  the  electrolyte  being  a  solution  of  caustic  potash 
in  water. 

The  retaining  cans  are  made  of  sheet  steel.  This  can 
is  welded  at  the  seams  by  the  autogenous  method,  making 
leakage  or  breakage  from  severe  vibration  impossible.  The 
walls  of  the  can  are  corrugated  so  as  to  give  the  greatest 
amount  of  strength  with  a  minimum  weight.  The  can  is 
electro-plated  with  nickel,  and  a  close  union  of  the  steel 
and  nickel  is  attained  by  fusing  them  together  sorthat  they 
are  practically  one  metal.  This  coating  of  nickel  protects 
the  steel  from  rust,  and  also  gives  to  each  cell  an  attractive 
and  highly  finished  appearance. 

WE  SHALL  proceed  to  describe  Cell  A-4..  Cell 
A-6  is  made  the  same,  but  contains  more  plates 
and  is  therefore  larger.  Each  cell  of  this  A-4.  type 
contains  four  positive  and  five  negative  plates. 

Each  positive  plate  consists  of  a  grid  of  nickel-plated 
steel  holding  thirty  tubes  filled  with  the  active  material,  in 
two  rows  of  fifteen  each. 

The  tubes  are  made  of  very  thin  sheet  steel,  perforated 
and  nickel-plated.  Each  tube  is  reinforced  and  protected 
by  small  ferrules,  eight  in  number.  These  prevent  expan¬ 
sion  thereby  retaining  perfect  internal  contact  at  all  times. 
The  active  material  in  the  tubes  is  interspersed  with 
16 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


thin  layers  of  pure  metallic  nickel  in  the  form  of  leaves  or 
flakes.  The  pure  nickel  flake  is  manufactured  by  an  elec¬ 
trochemical  process,  which  is  illustrated  below. 

A  negative  plate  comprises  twenty-four  flat  rectangu¬ 
lar  pockets  supported  in  three  horizontal  rows  in  a  nickel- 
plated  steel  grid. 

The  pockets  are  made  of  thin  nickel-plated  steel, 
perforated  with  fine  holes,  each  pocket  being  filled  with  an 


*  . 


oxide  of  iron  very  similar  to  what  is  commonly  called  iron 
rust.  In  the  negative  plate  each  pocket  is  subjected  to  very 
heavy  pressure,  so  that  it  becomes  practically  integral  with 
the  supporting  grid. 

In  a  cell  the  positive  and  negative  plates  are  assembled 
alternately,  and  connect,  the  positive  plates  with  the  positive 
pole,  and  the  negative  plates  with  the  negative  pole.  The 
plates  of  each  group  are  hung  on  a  connecting  rod  perpen¬ 
dicular  to,  but  integral  with,  the  pole.  They  are  correctly 
distanced  on  this  rod  by  nickel-plated  steel  spacing-washers, 
and  held  firmly  in  contact  by  nuts  screwed  on  both  ends. 


If  this  description  has  been  followed  closely  it  will  be 
seen  that  in  an  assembled  cell  nickel  plates  are  alternated 
with  iron  plates,  and  that  the  two  outside  plates  are  both 
iron  or  negative  plates.  The  outer  surfaces  of  the  outside 
plates  are  insulated  from  the  retaining  can  by  hard  rubber 
sheets.  Specially-designed  hard  rubber  pieces  are  fixed 
between  the  can  and  the  side  and  bottom  edges  of  the  plates ; 
and  these,  together  with  hard  rubber  rods  inserted  between 
the  plates,  maintain  correct  spacing  of  the  plates  at  all  points 
and  insure  permanent  insulation. 

Each  cell  has  a  cover  which  is  welded  in  place  by  the 
same  autogenous  process  used  for  the  side  and  bottom  seams. 


On  the  cover  are  four  mountings.  Two  of  these  are  the 
stuffing  boxes  through  which  the  positive  and  the  negative 
poles  extend. 

One  of  the  o^her  two  is  the  Separator,  so  called  because 
it  separates  spray  from  the  escaping  gas  while  the 


Powerful  hydraulic  presses  at  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  plant,  used  for  crimping  the  negative 
plates  after  the  pockets  have  been  put  in  place.  This  insures  perfect  contact  and 
gives  the  greatest  rigidity  and  stiffness  to  the  plate. 

is  charging.  This  prevents  Ubss  ;of  electrolyte  and  renders 
the  gases  inodorous. 

The  fourth  mounting  is  an  opening  for  filling  the  cell 
with  electrolyte  and  for  the  adding  of  distilled  water  to 
take  the  place  of  that  which  evaporates.  This  opening 
has  a  water-tight  cap  which  is  held  in  place  by  a  strong 


‘3 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


catch.  Fastened  to  this  cap  is  a  small  spring,  so  arranged 
that  the  cap  will  fly  open  unless  properly  fastened.  This 
reduces  the  possibility  of  leaving  the  cap  open  accidentally, 
thereby  causing  the  electrolyte  to  spill  out  should  the  cells 
be  violently  agitated  by  vibration  of  the  automobile. 

The  electrolyte  consists  of  a  twenty- one  per  cent 
solution  of  caustic  potash  in  distilled  water. 

Every  part  of  the  Edison  cell  is  manufactured  by 
specially- designed  machinery.  All  of  the  parts  are  strong 
and  durable.  All  active  material  manufactured — both  nickel 
and  iron — is  tested  before  being  used  in  commercial  cells, 
and  frequent  tests  are  also  made  of  the  internal  contacts  in 
tubes.  The  pockets  and  tubes  are  so  securely  fastened  in 
their  respective  grids  that  they  cannot  possibly  loosen,  and 
the  plates,  thus  formed,  are  practically  integral. 

In  an  assembled  battery  each  individual  cell  is  held 
securely  in  place  and  from  contact  with  adjacent  cells  by 
means  of  a  small  hard  rubber  button  which  extends  through 
the  slat  on  the  side  of  the  tray  and  fits  over  an  emboss 
pressed  out  on  the  side  of  the  can.  This  button,  by  per¬ 
forming  its  function  of  holding  each  cell  firmly  in  position, 
maintains  an  air-gap  between  cells,  and  thereby  insulates 
them  from  each  other. 

The  bottoms  of  the  cells  are  held  in  position  by  small 
buttons  protruding  from  a  conveniently  arranged  wooden 
block  fastened  to  the  bottom-slats  of  the  tray.  In  the 
bottom  of  each  cell  are  four  small  indentations  which  fit 
24 


over  these  buttons.  A  rubber  apron  insulates  the  cell  from  the 
block.  The  buttons  prevent  the  cells  from  becoming  displaced 
by  sudden  jolts  or  shocks, -affording  a  very  rigid  support. 

Electrical  connection  between  cells  is  made  by  means 
of  heavy  copper  connectors,  well  nickel-plated.  Each  con¬ 
nector  consists  of  a  solid  copper  wire,  on  the  ends  of  which 
are  swedged  specially-shaped  steel  lugs  which  fit  over  the 


13000010011  000II@10SBIIISSi 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


binding  posts  and  make  a  taper-joint  connection  with  them, 
insuring  perfect  electrical  contact.  A  nut  holds  each  lug 
securely  in  place.  This  makes  bad  contact  impossible  when 
the  connector  is.  once  properly  in  place,  even  though  the 
battery  be  subjected  to  violent  jolting,  such  as  is  often 
received  in  electric  automobiles. 

To  remove  a  cell  from  the  battery  at  any  time  is  a 
very  simple  operation,  performed  in  a  few  minutes.  A  socket 


wrench  for  removing  the  nuts  which  hold  down  the  connec¬ 
tors,  and  a  specially-designed  jack  for  lifting  the  lugs  from 
the  binding  posts  when  disconnecting  cells,  are  sent  with 
each  battery. 


IN  CONNECTION  with  the  filling  of  cells  with  distilled 
water  we  recommend  that  the  special  filling  apparatus 
supplied  by  us  be  used.  This  apparatus  consists  of  a 
nickel-plated  copper  tank,  a  set  of  dry  cells,  a  bell,  a  rubber 
tube  leading  from  the  tank,  and  a  double  wire  leading  from 
the  bell  and  battery  to  a  specially  designed  filling-nozzle, 
equipped  with  a  valve  by  means  of  which  the  water  may  be 


turned  on  or  off  at  will.  To  fill  a  cell  the  nozzle  is  placed 
in  the  filling  aperture  and  the  valve  released — the  proper 
height  of  solution  being  indicated  by  the  ringing  of  the  bell. 

Cells  are  filled  with  electrolyte  and  assembled  in  trays  , 
with  all  connectors  and  insulators  in  place  before  leaving 
the  factory. 

The  trays  in  which  cells  are  assembled — varying  in 


size  to  accommodate  different  numbers  of  cells — are  a  rad¬ 
ical  departure  from  anything  heretofore  offered  in  the  way 
of  a  battery  tray.  Where  formerly  the  ends  and  the  bottom 
were  dovetailed  together,  the  trays  are  now  made  of  contin¬ 
uous  strips,  the  corners  being  bent.  Trays  constructed  in 
this  manner  are  not  only  lighter  but  very  much  stronger 
than  those  constructed  in  the  old  way. 


34 


Characteristic  Features  of  the 
Edison  Storage  Battery 


THE  Edison  Battery  has  been  subjected  to  a  great 
variety  of  tests,  and  its  performance  in  these  has 
exceeded  the  expectations  of  even  its  optimistic 
inventor. 

The  Edison  Battery  requires  far  less  attention  and  care 
than  any  other  battery,  and  therefore  lessens  the  expense  for 
labor  in  a  garage. 

In  a  solution  of  caustic  potash  and  water,  only 
water  need  be  added  to  keep  the  electrolyte  in  the  right 
condition. 

Anyone  who  has  been  present  while  an  acid  battery 
was  being  charged  will  remember  the  obnoxious  fumes  of 
the  sulphuric  acid,  which  penetrated  everywhere.  These  same 
fumes  act  upon  the  ironwork  of  a  truck  or  wagon  and  eat 
it  away. 

Caustic  potash  solution  positively  does  not  affect  iron 
in  any  way,  but  rather  prevents  its  corrosion. 

An  Edison  Battery  weighs  about  half  as  much  as  a 
lead  battery  for  the  same  output ;  but  in  addition  to  this  it 
saves  about  fifty  per  cent  of  its  weight  in  the  construction 


35 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


of  the  truck  itself.  That  is,  a  truck  built  to  carry  an  Edison 
sixty-cell  battery  would  save  not  only  five  hundred  pounds 
in  battery  weight,  but  about  two  hundred  and  fifty  pounds 
in  the  weight  of  the  truck  over  the  same  truck  built  to  carry 
lead  cells. 

An  Edison  Battery  cannot  be  injured  by  overcharging, 
does  not  deteriorate  when  left  discharged,  makes  possible  the 
removal  of  any  cell  by  simply  detaching  the  connections 
from  the  poles,  and  gives  nearly  twice  the  output  or  mileage 
of  a  lead  battery  for  the  same  weight.  The  purity  of  the 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


Commercial  Tests  of  the 
Edison  Storage  Battery 


THE  Commercial  Vehicle ,  a  trade  paper,  has  given  an 
important  account  of  the  actual  working  of  the 
Type  A  Battery  in  connection  with  the  delivery 
service  of  a  large  department  store. 


R.  H.  MACY  &  CO.,  who  own  and  operate  thirty-one  electric  delivery 
wagons  and  trucks,  had  a  Lansden  wagon  fitted  with  one  of  the  new 
batteries  for  three  weeks.  The  new  cells  are  made  in  two  sizes,  desig¬ 
nated  A-4  and  A-6.  The  former  is  of  the  same  capacity  as  the  earlier 
type  E-27  Edison  Battery,  rated  at  one  hundred  and  fifty  ampere-hours 
discharge.  Type  A-6  has  the  same  number  and  size  of  plates  as  type 
E-27,  and  is  about  the  same  weight,  but  has  nearly  double  the  capacity, 
giving  two  hundred  and  sixty  ampere-hours  discharge.  It  requires  a 
charge  of  three  hundred  ampere-hours,  but  the  users  say  the  loss  is  much 
more  than  counterbalanced  by  the  work  it  does  and  by  other  points  of 
practical  excellence.  The  smaller  size  battery  weighs  about  seven  hun¬ 
dred  pounds,  and  the  larger  size  twelve  hundred.  Size  A-6  is  installed 
in  a  demonstration  wagon  of  Lansden  make,  which  has  been  christened 
the  Greyhound,  for  reasons  that  will  become  obvious.  At  the  time  an 
investigation  of  the  performance  of  this  outfit  was  made  by  a  representa¬ 
tive  of  The  Commercial  Vehicle,  up  to  June  21st,  it  had  been  running  in 
the  service  of  the  dry  goods  store  for  nearly  one  month. 

“Upon  being  received  it  was  first  given  a  special  test,  in  which  it 
was  run  three  consecutive  days  without  recharging,  and  made  a  total 


39 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


mileage  of  ninety-three  miles.  On  the  first  day  it  left  New  York  City 
at  eight  o’clock  in  the  morning,  crossed  the  ferry  to  Jersey  City  and 
covered  the  Bayonne  route,  going  all  the  way  to  Bergen  Point,  making 
approximately  one  hundred  stops  for  delivery  of  packages.  It  returned 
to  the  garage  at  six  p.  m.  The  same  route  was  covered  on  the  second 
day,  starting  at  eight  a.  m.,  making  about  the  same  number  of  stops, 
and  getting  back  at  five  p.  m.  On  the  third  day  it  traversed  the  regular 
Staten  Island  route  for  the  store,  embracing  nearly  all  the  towns  on  the 
north  end  of  the  Island,  which  is  very  hilly,  and  making  about  one 
hundred  stops  for  deliveries.  It  left  the  store  for  this  trip  at  eight-thirty 
a.  m.,  and  got  back  about  eight-thirty  in  the  evening.  During  this 
entire  period  the  battery  received  no  “  boost  ”  and  was  not  recharged. 
At  the  end  of  the  test  the  voltmeter  reading  showed  sixty  volts. 


FOLLOWING  this  initial  test,  the  Greyhound,  with  battery  A-6,  was 
put  on  the  Coney  Island  route,  which  is  claimed  to  be  the  worst  or 
longest  and  hardest  covered  regularly  in  one  day  of  any  served  by  any 
dry  goods  house  in  the  city.  It  is  from  sixty-three  to  sixty-seven  miles 
long  and  averages  one  hundred  and  fifty  stops  for  deliveries,  sometimes 
running  up  to  nearly  three  hundred  deliveries. 

“In  covering  this  route,  the  Greyhound  leaves  the  store  in  New 
York  City  at  eight  o’clock  in  the  morning,  crosses  the  Brooklyn  Bridge, 
and  thence  runs  out  Fourth  Avenue  to  Sixtieth  Street,  where  deliveries 
begin.  From  there  it  goes  to  Fort  Hamilton,  making  deliveries  along 
the  way,  returns  to  Dyker  Heights,  then  does  part  of  Borough  Park. 
From  Borough  Park  it  delivers  all  the  way  down  to  Bath  Beach,  taking 
both  sides  of  the  main  line,  thence  through  Bensonhurst  to  Ulmer  Park 
and  on  down  to  Coney  Island.  It  covers  Surf  Avenue,  in  Coney  Island, 
all  the  way  down  to  Sea  Gate,  at  the  westerly  end.  Returning,  it  goes 
to  Brighton  Beach,  then  cuts  over  to  Sheepshead  Bay  and  starts  on  the 
homeward  trip,  coming  back  through  Flatbush,  where  it  finishes  its 
deliveries,  and  re-enters  Manhattan  Island  by  way  of  the  Williamsburg 
Bridge.  The  wagon  usually  arrives  at  the  garage  about  seven  p.  m. 

4° 


“If  there  are  an  unusual  number  of  deliveries  to  be  made,  the 
driver  is  accompanied  by  a  boy  to  carry  packages,  but  otherwise  he  is 
alone.  It  is  an  enormous  day’s  work  to  be  done  week  after  week,  but 
the  driver  likes  it  because  he  gets  back  from  his  work  about  three  hours 
earlier  than  when  horses  were  used.  One  reason  why  it  is  possible  to 
make  so  many  deliveries  on  such  a  long  route  in  so  short  a  time  is  because, 
unlike  the  city  routes,  there  are  no  stairs  to  climb  to  upper  floors  of  apart¬ 
ment  and  flat  buildings.  Often  the  customers  see  the  motor  wagon  stop 
in  front  of  their  residences  and  come  out  to  receive  the  packages,  with¬ 
out  waiting  for  the  doorbell  to  ring. 

“When  this  route  was  covered  with  horses,  two  teams  were  used 
every  day,  and  hampers  of  packages  were  shipped  by  express  to  Bath 
Beach,  about  midway  of  the  delivery  route,  where  the  wagons  called  for 
the  packages  and  began  their  deliveries.  Very  often  the  wagons  could 
not  start  delivering  until  ten  a.  m. 


THE  GREYHOUND  is  a  one-ton  wagon  of  the  regular  Lansden  type. 
It  weighs  2,460  pounds  empty,  without  battery,  and  3,660  pounds  with 
battery;  that  is,  the  type  A-6  battery  weighs  1,200  pounds.  The  wagon 
averages  about  eleven  miles  an  hour  actual  running  time. 

4i 


“  The  smaller  battery,  type  A-4,  has  been  in  use  by  the  same  house 
in  one  of  its  two-year-old  Lansden  1,000  pound  wagons  since  June  1st. 
In  order  to  test  it  out,  it  was  first  tried  on  the  Coney  Island  route,  already 
described.  It  covered  forty-five  miles  over  heavy,  muddy  roads,  making 
one  hundred  and  seventy-five  stops  for  deliveries,  before  the  battery  charge 
gave  out.  This  showed  that  it  was  incapable  of  serving  this  route,  how¬ 
ever,  so  it  was  put  on  the  Bayonne  route,  running  down  to  Bergen  Point. 
It  has  regularly  served  this  route  ever  since,  covering  an  average  of  forty- 
three  miles  a  day  and  making  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  stops.  The 
voltage  reading  of  the  battery  after  the  day’s  work  shows  that  it  is  capable 
of  doing  fifty  miles  a  day  under  the  same  conditions.  The  wagon  leaves 
the  store  about  eight  a.  m.  and  gets  back  to  the  garage  at  five  to  five- 
thirty  p.  m.  It  is  not  given  any  boost  during  the  day — in  fact  the  drivers 
are  not  allowed  to  boost  the  batteries  in  any  of  the  cars.  This  small 
battery  contains  sixty-five  cells  and  weighs  about  seven  hundred  pounds. 

“Various  characteristics  of  the  new  battery  are  commented  upon  by 
the  superintendent  of  the  garage  and  others  connected  with  the  manage¬ 
ment  of  the  store  under  whose  direct  observation  the  work  of  the 
delivery  service  comes.  The  most  important  is  the  uniformity  of  dis¬ 
charge  capacity  regardless  of  the  age  of  the  battery.  This  is  the  chief 
characteristic,  perhaps,  of  all  Edison  batteries,  as  the  dry  goods  house  has 
one  of  the  early  ones  (type  E-27)  that  has  been  in  its  service  for  nearly 
five  and  one-half  years,  and  is  today  regularly  doing  thirty-five  miles  a 
day.  Practically  no  other  work  has  been  done  on  it  in  that  period  except 
to  recharge  it  with  potash  every  eight  months,  and  of  course  to  keep  the 


Electric  vehicles  equipped  with  Edison  Storage  Batteries  are  used  exclusively  by  Adams  Express 
Company  in  Indianapolis,  Ind.  Tile  above  photograph  shows  part  of  this  equipment. 


cells  filled  with  distilled  water.  This  quality,  it  is  pointed  out,  is  of 
great  value,  as  it  relieves  the  superintendent  of  deliveries  of  the  mental 
effort  of  remembering  the  capabilities  of  each  battery  according  to  the 
time  it  has  been  in  use,  so  that  a  battery  capable  of  doing,  say,  twenty 
miles  will  not  be  put  on  a  route  thirty  miles  long  and  get  stalled  on 
the  road. 

“  During  the  three  weeks  that  the  Macy  Department  Store  had  the 
Greyhound,  it  was  given  severe  tests  over  a  number  of  different  routes 
into  the  suburbs.  For  example,  on  April  1 6th  it  went  to  Coney  Island, 
making  about  fifty  deliveries,  and  on  the  same  day,  without  recharging, 
it  ran  to  Woodlawn  and  hack.  Then  to  completely  discharge  the 
battery  it  was  run  about  ten  miles  in  nearby  deliveries  in  the  neighbor¬ 
hood  of  the  store.  The  distance  covered  during  the  day  was  between 
eighty-seven  and  ninety  miles.  The  charging  plug  had  been  taken  out 
at  eight  a.  m.,  and  was  not  put  in  again  until  three-thirty  a.  m.  the 
following  day 

“  On  May  5th  the  wagon  was  sent  to  Morristown,  N.  J.  Leaving 
the  store  at  about  eight  a.  m.,  it  covered  seventy-two  miles  out  and  back, 
uphill  and  down,  over  macadamized  roads,  making  forty-five  stops  for 
deliveries,  and  returned  to  the  garage  by  nine-thirty  p.  m.,  or  two  hours 
before  a  team  of  horses  would  return  to  the  stable  in  Newark  after 
serving  the  same  territory  in  Morristown. 

“  On  another  occasion  the  Staten  Island  route  was  served,  including 
Tottenville,  at  the  extreme  southerly  end  of  the  island.  Owing  to  the 
hilly  nature  of  the  roads  there,  it  is  asserted  by  the  manager  of  the  garage 


43 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


that  fifty  miles  on  the  island  is  equivalent  to  eighty  or  ninety  miles  over 
level,  smooth  roads.  Yet  the  wagon  covered  the  route,  making  sixty 
stops  for  deliveries,  and  returned,  running  strong,  in  about  five  hours  less 
time  than  the  same  deliveries  could  have  been  made  with  two  or  three 
teams  of  horses. 

“DURING  the  three  weeks  that  Macy’s  had  the  wagon  fitted  with  the 
new  A-6  battery,  the  machine  was  regularly  put  on  the  longest  routes, 
serving  suburban  territory  that  usually  is  handled  by  horses  and  wagons 
or  by  express.  Besides  the  Tottenville  route,  which  is  fifty-six  miles 
long,  there  was  covered  the  trip  to  Richmond,  also  on  Staten  Island, 
forty-eight  and  one-half  miles,  Scarsdale  in  Westchester  County,  north 
of  the  city,  a  round  trip  of  forty-three  and  two-tenth  miles;  Coney  Island 


Electric  vehicles  equipped  with  Edison  Storage  Batteries  owned  and  operated  by 
James  A.  Hearn  &  Son  of  New  York  City. 


“The  wagon  was  regularly  worked  fourteen,  fifteen  and  eighteen 
hours  a  day,  according  to  the  chief  engineer  and  garage  superintendent  of 
Macy’s,  and  averaged  from  fifty-six  to  fifty-seven  miles  a  day  on  one 
charge  without  ever  having  a  boost,  and  regularly  returned  still  good  for 
ten  or  eleven  miles  more.  It  was  regularly  recharged  at  night  for  six  to 
seven  hours  at  a  forty  ampere-hour  rate. 

“The  battery  experts  state,  without  reservation,  that  the  battery  is 
easily  capable  of  serving  the  longest  and  hardest  delivery  route  operated 
out  of  New  York  City  and  of  surpassing  the,  physical  endurance  of  the 
driver;  that  is,  no  driver,  even  with  the  aid  of  a  boy,  could  drive  the 
machine  day  in  and  day  out  over  a  longer  route  and  make  more  deliv¬ 
eries  than  the  Greyhound  is  capable  of  doing. 

“There  can  be  no  question  that  those  who  have  had  supervision  of 
the  work  of  the  battery  are  enthusiastic  regarding  it.  They  admit  that 
the  first  cost  is  high,  comparatively,  but  as  an  offset  to  this,  point  out  the 
low  cost  of  maintenance  over  a  term  of  years;  and  in  continuous  service 
of  any  sort  the  original  investment  in  necessary  apparatus  is  only  one 
item  in  the  expense  account.”  . 


45 


Advantages  of 
Motor  over  Horse  Vehicles 

i 

ECONOMY 

(a)  OF  MONEY 

1  Cheap  upkeep. 

2  Consumes  nothing  while  idle. 

3  Requires  less  stable  room,  permitting  smaller  housing. 

4  Requires  fewer  men  to  care  for,  or  groom. 

5  Requires  no  attention  on  days  of  rest,  or  when  idle. 

6  Longer  life. 

7  In  light  small  package  delivery  it  does  work  of  two  or  more  wagons, 

reducing  force  of  men  to  deliver  same,  because  it  carries  more 
load  and  goes  twice  faster  than  a  horse. 

(b)  OF  TIME 

1  Delivers  in  much  quicker  time  than  horse. 

2  Return  trip  to  distributing  centre  at  high  speed. 

3  Can  work  unlimited  proportion  of  day. 

4  Requires  no  days  of  rest. 

5  Easily  handled  in  congested  traffic,  at-  good  speeds. 

6  As  garages  are  permitted  where  stables  would  not  be,  it  permits 

more  convenient  and  nearer  stabling,  nearer  to  distributing  centre. 

7  Always  ready. 

8  Develops  power  despite  weather  and  road  conditions. 

9  Can  be  worked  overtime  for  holiday  trade. 

( c )  OF  SPACE 

1  In  stable. 

2  In  street. 

3  In  loading  space  at  warehouse,  permitting  more  wagons  to  load  at 

same  time. 


46 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


II 

OTHER  ADVANTAGES 

(a)  INTENSIVE 

1  Fewer  wagons,  on  account  of  higher  speed,  will  do  work. 

2  Fewer  men  will  take  care  of  same  delivery  unit. 

3  Consumes  only  when  in  actual  service. 

(b)  EXTENSIVE. 

1  Permits  larger  radius  of  delivery,  meaning  possible  extension  of  free 

delivery  limits,  yet  at  low  cost. 

2  Is  in  itself  a  good  advertisement. 

III 

AND  SOME  GOOD  REASONS 

1  Motor  transportation  would  go  far  to  solve  traction  and  congestion 

of  traffic  problems  for  everybody. 

2  Less  damage  to  roads. 

3  Dirt,  dust  and  manure  would  disappear. 

4  Permits  the  accurate  and  easy  determination  of  costs. 

5  It  is  a  sign  that  the  owner  is  progressive. 

6  Unsoiled  livery. 


47 


Advantages  of 

Electric  over  Gasoline  Vehicles 

ECONOMY 

(a)  OF  MONEY 

1  Greater  simplicity,  hence  fewer  repairs. 

2  Lower  cost  of  insurance. 

3  More  durable  than  reciprocal  type. 

4  Less  care. 

5  No  elaborate  repair  tools. 

6  Small  loss  of  power. 

7  No  experienced  chauffeur,  who  must  get  higher  wages;  and  small 

number  available. 

8  Freedom  from  insurance  limitations. 

(i)  OF  TIME 

1  Simplicity  of  adjustment. 

2  No  cranking. 

3  Instant  readiness. 

4  Develop  power  despite  conditions  of  weather,  etc. 

5  Less  time  in  repair  shop. 

II 

OTHER  ADVANTAGES 

1  Simplicity  of  construction. 

2  Simplicity  of  operation. 

3  Danger  of  fire  or  explosion  eliminated.  Hence  wider  field. 

4  Universality  of  electric  power. 

5  No  freezing. 

6  No  tanks  to  leak. 

7  Favorable  legislation  in  Germany. 

8  Electric  permitted  on  docks  and  terminals  where  no  gasoline. 

9  Legislation  in  Germany  and  London  adverse  to  gasoline.  Same  here. 

48 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


III 

SENTIMENTAL  REASONS 

1  No  noise. 

2  No  odor. 

3  Advertising  feature. 

4  Does  not  spot  liveries  with  grease,  or  make  goods  odoriforous. 


49 


THE  EDISON  STORAGE  BATTERY 


PRICE  LIST  OF  CELLS  AND  PARTS 


Price  of  cell  complete . 

Electric  filling  apparatus,  complete . 

Filling  tank  only . 

Filler,  complete  with  batteries  and  bell . 

“  with  hose  and  wire  only . 

“  hose,  per  length . 

Recanning . 

Connectors  (regular) . 

“  (special) . 

Jumpers,  6  inch . 

“  i  z  “  . 

“  1 5  “  . 

“  48  “  . 

Block  Insulators . 

Button  Insulators . 

Lid  Gaskets . 

Pole  Nuts . 

Separator  Valves . 

Terminal  Lugs . 

Separator  Top  Caps . 

Socket  Wrench . 

Disconnecting  Jack . 

Potash  solution,  per  pound . 

Trays .  2  cell 

3  “ 

4  “ 

5  “ 

6  .  “ 

7  “ 

8  “ 

9  •< 


Type  A-4 
$13-5° 


Type  A-6 
$20.00 


6.00 

4.00 

3.00 


2.25 

•25 

.25 

•z5 

•3° 

•35 

.40 

.14 


.02 

.02% 

.10 

■05 

.50 
1. 00 
.08 
i-55 
i-55 
i-55 
1.65 

1- 75 
2.05 
2.15 
2.25 

2- 35 


The  .19 10,  Edison  Storage  Battery 


■  Walter  E.  Holland 

•  anti 

A  Test  of  the  Edison  Storage  Battery 

Conducted  and  repotted  by.  the 
Electrical  Testing  Laboratories 


FILES 


the  1910  EDISON 
STORAGE  BATTERY 


WALTER  E.  HOLLAND 


“ADAT  the  twenty-sixth  annual  meeting  OF  THE 
ASSOCIATE  OF  EDISON  ILLUMINATING  COMPANIES 
HELD  AT  FRONTENAC,  THOUSAND  ISLANDS 
N.  Y„  SEPTEMBER  6,  7,  AND  8,  1910 


Copyrighted  1910  by  the  Association 
of  Edison  Illuminating  Companies 


York 


exceedingly  hig 


. 


TEST  OF  THE  EDISON 
STORAGE  BATTERY 


MADE  FOR  THE  ASSOCIATION  OF  EDISON  ILLUMINATING 
COMPANIES  UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  THE 
LAMP  COMMITTEE 


TS  CONDUCTED  AND  REPORTED 
ELECTRICAL  TESTING  LABORATORIE 
NEW  YORK  CITY 


TO  BE  PRESENTED  AT  THE  TWENTY-SIXTH  ANNUAL 
CONVENTION  OF  THE  ASSOCIATION  OF  EDISON 
ILLUMINATING  COMPANIES,  HOTEL 
FRONTENAC,  THOUSAND  ISLANDS 
SEPTEMBER  6,  7  AND  8,  1910 


Electrical  Testing  Laboratories 
New  York  City 


REPORT  NO.  8286 

Test  of  Edison  Storage  Battery  Made  For 
Association  of  Edison  Illuminating  Compani 
Under  Direction  of  the  Lamp  Committee 

ORDER  NO.  5871. 

INDEX 


General  statement  . ; . 

Description,  general  . . . 

Description,  data  . 

Outline  of  Tests  made  . 

Methods . 

Observed  data  . *’* 

Effect  of  rate  and  time  of  charge  . 

Capacity  at  various  discharge  rates  . . , 
Maximum  power  and  energy  available 

Drop  in  voltage  during  discharge  . 

Effect  of  room  temperature  . 

Loss  of  capacity  while  standing  . 

Capacity  on  a  variable  discharge  . 

Summary  of  Results,  tabulated  . . 


Curves  and  Tabulated  Observed  Data  at  End  of  Report. 


l 

r 


CAPACITY  AT  VARIOUS  RATES  OF  DISCHARGE. 

The  results' of  tests  to  show  the  capacity  at  various  rates  of 
large  throughout  what  tiie  manufacturers  considered  a  sufficicnt- 
lide  range  are  given  in  curve  sheet  0.  .  It  shows  tile  ampere 

ual  to  300  per  cent,  normal,  also  ampere  hour  and  watt  hour 
cncies,  average  volts,  etc. 

(a)  Maximum  ampere  hour  capacity  and  ampere  hour 
efficiency  are  obtained  at  about  the  normal  rate  of  discharge, 
namely,  15  amperes.  These  values  arc,  on  a  normal  charge, 
202  ampere  hours  and  80  per  cent,  respectively. 

(b)  The  ampere  hour  capacity  and  efficiency  does  not 
change  a  great  deal  with  the  rate.  The  maximum  capacity  of 
*02  ampere  hours  is  at  -15  amperes  discharge,  the.  minimum  of 
2-ttl  is  at  135  amperes  discharge  while  about  259  or  200  ampere 
hours  is  obtained  at,  22.5  amperes  discharge.  The  ampere  hour 
efficiency  ranges  from  about  85  per  cent,  at  half  rate  discharge 
to  80  per  cent,  at  normal  rate  and  about  .79  per  cent,  at  three 
times  normal  rate,. 

(c)  The  watt  hour  efficiency  ranges  from  about  01  per 
cent,  at  half  rate  to  00  per  cent,  at  normal  rate,  00.5  per  cent,  at 
double  rate  and  00  per  cent,  at  three  times  normal  rate.  Curve 
sheet  10  shows'  the  watt  hour  capacity  on,  a  cell  basis  and  a 
battery  basis  and  curve  sheet  10a  gives  tiie  same  data  on  a 
‘pound  of  cell”  basis.  At  normal; rate  of  discharge,  following 
t  normal  charge,  tile  capacity '  is  10.0  watt  hours  per  pound 
corresponding  to  a  rate  of  2.8  watts  per  , pound.  Tile  capacity 
ranges  from  10.7  watt  hours  per  pound  at  half  normal  rate  to  1014 
it  normal,  about  10  at  150  per  cent,  normal,  about  15.3  at  double 
iiormal  and  13..I  watt  hours  pur  pound  at  .three  times  normal; 

MAXIMUM  POWER  AND  ENERGY  AVAILABLE. 


charge  is  about  225  watts  per  cell  or  11.0  watts  per  pound.  At 
maximum  rate  about  150  watt  hours  per  cell  or  7.5  watt  hours 
pound  of  cell  arc. obtained  which  is  about  -10  per  cent,  of  the  watt 
capacity  at  normal  rate  of  discharge. 

DROP  IN  VOLTAGE  DURING  DISCHARGE. 

Tile  total  drop  in  voltage  from  the  beginning  of  discharg 
practically  the  ultimate  capacity  is,  when  discharged  at  normal 
about  30  per  cent.  This  figure  holds  for  rates  up  to  twice  normal 
Beyond  that,  a  little  more  capacity  can  be  obtained  if  discharf 
carried  to  35  per  cent,  drop  in  voltage.  Ten  (10)  per  cent,  of  this 
occurs  within  the  first  20  minutes  at  2/3  normal  rate  of  discll 
or  over.  If  discharge  is  stopped  just  at  the  turn  at  the  end  of 
voltage  curve,  the  total  drop  is  about  22  to  2-1  per  cent.  About  f 
85  per  cent. 'of  tile  discharge— the  middle  portion— takes  place  wi 
drop  in  voltage  cental  to  about  10  per  cent,  of  the  initial  value. 

EFFECT  OF  ROOM  TEMPERATURE  ON  CAPACITY 

The  effect  of  temperature  on  the  capacity  of  the  battery  is  sh 
on  curve  sheet  15.  The  effect  of  low  temperature  is  to  reduce 
capacity  whether  only  discharge,  or  both  charge  and  discharge, 
place  at  the  low  temperature.  I-Iigli  temperature  increases 
capacity,  but  more  when  discharge  only  takes  place'  at  the  high  I 
perature  than  when  both  charge  and  discharge  arc  made  at 
high  temperature.  Numerically,  the  data  obtained  shows  the  foil 

When 

charged  and  discharged  at  -10°  falir.  room  temperature, 
loss  is  about  0  per  cent,  or  about  0.15  per  cent,  per  del 
below  normal  (83°  falir.).  The  same  result  is  indicated  w 
charge  takes  place  at  tile  normal  temperature  and  disclu 
at  40°  falir.  showing  that  the  loss  takes  place  in  the 


i  should  be  considered  us  approximate  only. 

CAPACITY  DUE  TO  STANDING  AFTER  BEING 
CHARGED. 

►  shows  the  effect  on  the  capacity  when  a  battery  is 
cd  immediately  after  being  charged.  This  loss,  in  per 
normal  capacity  obtained  when  discharged  immediately, 

in  end  of  charge  and 
g  of  discharge. 


CAPACITY  ON  VARYING  DISCHARGE 

Curve  sheet  14  gives  tile  log  of  a  test  at  different 
discharge,  the  rates  varying  from  half  normal  to  thr 
It  will  be  noted  that  an  increase  in  ampere  hour  c 
tabled  of  nearly  fl  per  cent,  over  that  at  a  constant  i 

crease  in  capacity  is  doubtless  due  to  the  increase!: 
which  discharge  after  the  high  rates  took  place. 

SUMMARY  OF  RESULTS. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
National  Phonograph  Company 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Phonograph  Outfits,  Phonograph  Supplies."  Form 
49.  1899. 

"Parts  of  Phonographs."  Form  270. 1901. 

"Phonograph  Accessories."  Form  337. 1902. 

"Edison  Phonographs."  Form  335. 1902.  [With  attached  "Important 
Supplement,"  1902.] 

"Jobbers  Discount  Sheet."  Form  355J.  1902. 

"Dealers  Discount  Sheet."  From  387D.  1902. 

"Directions  for  Setting  Up  and  Operating  the  Edison  Home  Phonograph." 
Form  476.  Ca.  1903.  [Not  selected:  similar  directions  for  the  Gem, 
Standard,  and  Triumph  models.] 

"Just  Airs:  Souvenir  of  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition."  Form  550.  Ca. 
1904. 

"Edison  Phonographs."  Form  740. 1905. 

"Edison  Coin-Slot  Phonographs."  Form  910. 1906. 

"How  to  Install  the  Edison  Commercial  System  Conducted  with  the  Business 
Phonograph."  Ca.  1907.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Records,  Parts,  and  Accessories:  Jobbers 
Discounts."  Form  1286. 1908. 

"Edison  Phonographs,  Records,  Parts,  and  Accessories:  Dealers' 
Discounts."  Form  1286. 1908. 

"Edison  Amberol  Records:  What  They  Are  and  How  to  Play  Them  on  Your 
Phonograph."  Form  1415.  Ca.  1908. 


"Information  Concerning  and  Directions  for  Putting  the  Combination 

Attachment  on  the  Edison  Home  Phonograph."  Form  468A.  1909.  [Not 
selected:  similar  directions  for  the  Gem,  Standard,  and  Triumph 
models.] 

"How  to  Make  Records  at  Home  with  an  Edison  Phonograph."  Form  1090. 
Ca.  1910. 

"The  Edison  Phonograph:  A  Catalogue  of  Edison  Phonographs,  Records, 
Reproducers,  Attachments  and  Accessories."  Form  1780. 1910. 

"'My  South  Polar  Expedition'  Vividly  Told  by  Lieut.  E.  H.  Shackleton  on  an 
Edison  Amberol  Record."  Form  1801. 1910. 

"Jobbers'  and  Dealers'  Discounts  and  Net  Prices  on  Edison  Phonographs, 
Records,  Accessories  and  Parts."  1910. 


"Parts  of  Edison  Phonographs,  Reproducers,  and  Attachments."  1910. 


Edison  Phonographs  » 
Phonograph  Outfits  *  * 
Phonograph  Supplies  * 

Rational  Phonograph  Co. 

Factory,  Edison  laboratory,  Orange,  n.  3. 

Ollicc  and  Salesroom,  St.  James  Bunding 
Broadway  and  CwcntyStxth  St.  new  Vorh 


The  Edison  Phonograph 

and  what  it  does 


s 


The  Edison  Phon-  A1!  ot  these  are  called  Phonographs, 

ograph  is  made  in  ^ 

two  types  and  five  They  will  record  and  reproduce  human 

Styles . speech  and  other  forms  of  articulate 

sound.  They  will  record  music  and 
reproduce  it  afterwards.  They  will  repeat  what  has  been  sung, 
spoken,  or  played  by  others  to  the  machine,  such  as  music,  songs, 
etc.  They  will  shave  off  or  prepare  cylinders  that  have  once 
had  speeches,  songs,  etc.,  recorded  on  them,  so  that  every  cylinder 
can  he  used  again  and  again  for  new  records,  if  desired. 

It  is  the  best  of  all  such  instruments, 
Hence  the  Phon-  because  it  does  these  things  simply 
ograph  is  a  musi-  a,ld  perfectly.  It  will  sing  for  you, 

cal  instrument,  a  wi“  play  for  y01''  f  win,  rep,eat  l° 

’  you,  the  music  of  famous  bands  and 
talking  machine,  orchestras,  the  sweet  voices  of  famous 
a  singing  machine  si“g°rs.  a»d  the  precious  voices  of 
all  in  one  .  .  .  [a,,,w  even  though  they 


i  perished,  j 


How  Phono-  public 

Qfdphs  are  sold  Records  made  oil  one  machine  will  fit 
any  other.  There  can  be  no  confusion, 
therefore,  in  ordering.  Phonograph  Outfits’ are  also  furnished 
with  accessories ;  such  as  Amplifying  Horns,  Musical  Records, 
Cases,  Multiple  Hearing  Tubes,  and  other  supplies  required  by  the 
Phonograph  Exhibitor,  particulars  of  which  are  included  in  this 
price  list.  Any  of  these  items  can  be  furnished  separately,  if 


Description  of  The ‘w0  of  Ed‘so"  phon°f“ph 

,  .  are  the  Electric  and  Spring  Motor, 

the  dltterent  The  five  styles  are  Class  M.  and  Class 

types  and  classes  E.  Electric ;  and  Class  S.  M.,  Class  H. 

.  and  Class  S.  of  the  Spring  Motor  type. 
Flprtrir  The  Edison  Electric  Phonograph,  Class  M., 
Liecinc  (Motor)  Machine,  is  actuated  by  an  electric  motor, 

Class  M.  which  forms  part  of  the  machine.  The  Class  M.  , 

Phonograph  is  the  perfected  type  of  Mr.  Edison’s  electrical  ma¬ 
chine.  It  requires  a  battery  to  supply  the  power  for  running  it. 
The  battery  is  not  a  part  of  the  machine,  but  must  be  purchased  as 
an  extra.  The  machine  is  perfect  in  all  details,  and  accurate  and 
brilliant  in  reproduction.  Price,  $75. 

Class  E  The  Edison  Electric  Phonograph,  Class  E.,  (electric 
light  current),  is  furnished  with  an  electric  motor 
wound  for  the  1 10  to  1 20  volt  direct  current.  The  outfit  is  similar 
to  Class  M.  in  every  respect  except  the  motor,  Price,  $90. 

5  •  u.f..  The  Edison  Spring  Motor  Phonograph, 

spring  Motor.  class  s  M  _  is  a  high  ^  instrument. . 

Class  S.  M.  The  motive  power  of  this  machine  is  a 

powerful  spring-motor  movement  contained  in  the  machine  itself, 
and  wound  with  a  crank.  The  top,  or  Phonographic  part,  is  the 
same  as  the  Class  M.  Electric  Machine  first  described.  No  bat¬ 
tery  or  electricity  is  used.  Price,  $75. 

Class  H  The  ®^‘son  H°tne  Phonograph  is  also  a  spring-motor 
machine,  made  for  popular  home  use,  and  requires  no 
battery  or  electrical  energy.  The  price  is  less  than  one-half  that  of 
the  other  types,  and  it  works  admirably,  having  the  same  speaking 
and  musical  qualities, .and  using  the  same  devices  to  accomplish 
those  results.  •  The  spring-motor  which  forms  a  part  of  this 
Phonograph  is  well  made,  and  differs  from  the  larger  motor  only 
in  not  running  so  long  with  a  single  winding.  The  reproduction  or 
"playing,"  however,  is  just  as  loud  and  clear,  Price,  $30. 

Class  S  Edison  Standard  Phonograph  is  a  standard  ma¬ 

chine  in  every  respect.  It  is  built  on  the  same 
general  lines  as  the  Home  Phonograph,  with  the  exception  of  a 
different  arrangement  of  the  feed,  and  motor  runs  from  two  to 
three  records  with  one  winding  instead  of  six.  It  is  durable, 
handsome  and  attractive  in  appearance.  The  same  Speaker  is 
used  on  it  as  is  used  on  the  higher  priced  machines,  the  result  is 
consequently  identical.  Price,  $20. 


Edison  Standard  Phonograph. 


*  is  made  with  the  same  careful  precision  that  characterizes 
all  Edison  Phonographs,  and  is  complete  in  every  respect.  The 
Standard  i.i  the  Ideal  Talking  Machine. 

Made  of  iron,  steel  and  brass,  nickeled  gears  and  mandrel. 
Black  enamel  and  gold  finish. 

Encased  in  a  handsome  oak,  dust-proof  carrying  case. 

.  Actuated  by  a  spring  motor  that  runs  two  to  three  records 
with  a  single  winding.  Crank  handle  does  not  revolve  while  the 
machine  is  running.  Can  be  wound  while  in  motion  without 
interfering  with  reproduction. 

Light,  durable  aud  efficient.  Absolutely  noiseless.  Regula¬ 
tion  perfect.  Can  be  operated  by  a  child,  so  simple  is  its  mechan¬ 
ism.  Weighs.  17  lbs.  Size  9  in.  x  12  in.  x  9#  inches  high. 

Will  record,  will  reproduce,  will  shave  off.  Fitted,  yith  in¬ 
stantaneous  speaker  clamps  for  instant  interchange  of  .speakers. 
Full  printed  directions  packed  with  each  machine. 


shaving  knife,  a  two-wn^  heart  ng^tube.  a  14-iticlipoliahedbrass  horn,  a  camel's  hair  chip 
Vhese  ports’nre  essentfnl  to  a  perfectly  equipped  and  complete  talking  machine  outfit. 


n  Phonographs 


Cheapest  Because 


Edison  Standard  Phonograph  Outfit,  No.  48. 


The  Edison 
Standard  Speaker’s 


screw.  Use  the  Automatic  for  re  '  ^ 

The  Edison  Recorder, 

especially  adapted  for  recording  pi 
It  is  not  constructed  so  rigidly  as  t 
Speaker,  and  consequently  adjusts 
matically,  making  an  even  and  u: 
on  the  surface  of  the  blank.  It 
with  a  recording  sapphire  only,  o: 
quality  and  most  delicate  adjust 
adept  at  record  making  will  find  ir 


about  Speakers 


Edison  Home  Phonograph  Outfit,  No.  39. 


Price,  Complete,  $39.00. 


Edison  Home  Phonograph  Outfit,  No.  58. 

CLASS  H. 


Price,  Complete,  $58.00. 


Edison  Special  Home  and  Travelling  Outfit, 
No.  85. 


CLASS  H. 


Edison  Spring  Motor  Phonograph. 


Price,  $75.00. 


A  CTUATED  by  powerful  triple  springs,  which  drive  the  machine  through 
IX  fourteen  records  with  n  single  winding. 

No  electricity  or  battery  required. 

Winds  noiselessly,  runs  noiselessly,  governs  perfectly. 

Simple  but  effective  construction,  and  in  every  respect  a  standard  ma¬ 
chine.  Removable  hardened  steel  bearings,  belt-tightener,  and  other  useful 
devices. 

Includes  oak  body  box  and  carrying  cover  as  shown.  Finished  in  black 
and  gilt  enamel,  with  nickel  parts,  and  fitted  with  instantaneous  spenker 
clamps  for  instant  interchange  of  speakers. 

Weighs  43  pounds  complete,  and  is  particularly  recommended  for  poit- 
able  service.  Size  16#  inches  long,  io#  wide  and  14  high.  Full  printed 
directions  packed  with  each  machine.  'v 


Edison  Electric  Phonograph. 


Price,  $75.00. 


-THE  unrivaled  Model  of  all  talking  machines  in  the  world. 

1  Latest  type  of  the  Electric  Phonograph,  equipped  with  elec¬ 
tric  battery  motor  and  governor,  and  fitted  with  instantaneous 
speaker  clamps,  for  instant  interchange  of  speakers.  ■  The  above 
cut  shows  the  complete  instrument.  It  sets  in  an  oak  body  box. 
Weighs  65  pounds. .  Finished  in  black,  gold  and  nickel.  Size, 
20  inches  long,  9#  wide  and  it  inches  high. 

A  Battery  is  not  a  part  of  the  Phonograph ,  but  is  an  independ¬ 
ent  apparatus.  Storage  or  primary  (chemical)  battery  may  be 
used.  See  page  21. 

The  motor  requires  a  steady  current  of  2%  volts  and  2 
amperes. 


Edison  Electric  Phonograph. 

CLASS  E. 

TN  general  appearance  and  equipment  this  Phonograph  is  exactly  the  same 
I  as  Class  M,  described  on  page  10  Jhut  is  furnished  with  an  electric  motor 

"  The  most  convenient  style  of  Phonograph  made.  The  power  is  both 
continuous  and  handy,  ns  connecting  wires  need  only  to  he  attached  to  the 
nearest  electric  light  connection. 

Equipped  with  resistance  block  fitted  with  lamps,  attaching  plug  and  cord. 

Price,  $90.00. 

Edison  Electric  Phonograph  Outfit  No.  110M. 


Edison  Special  Outfit  No.  157. 


tery  needed ;  or  Slornge  Battery  if  pre- 


Price,  Complete,  $157.00. 


-I 


180  Peg  Record  Cabinet. 


This  is  a  beautiful  piece 
of  furnitnre,  finely  finish¬ 
ed  in  every  respect.  High 
polish  quartered  oak, 
handsome  brass  handles 
and  accurately  put  to¬ 
gether.  Eight  drawers 
hold  each  18  records,  and 
the  three  smaller  ones  12 

capacity  of  15  dozen.  The 


Edison  Exhibition 
Phonograph  Battery. 


A  COMPLETE  MANUAL  OF  THE 
EDISON  PHONOGRAPH. 

(BUDDY  IDDUSTRATED.) 

'"pWENTY-TWQ  Original  illustrations  in  outline,  showing 
Electrical  Connections,  the  separate  Parts  of  the  Machine, 
the  Spring  Motor,  the  Electric  Motor,  the  Governor,  the 
Body,  etc.,  the  various  operations  of  Shaving,  Recording 
and  Reproducing,  with  Diagrams  of  the  several  Speakers. 
Every  part  indexed,  numbered,  and  named  correctly. 

Pr.AiN  Instructions,  up  to  date,  as  to  the  Details  of  Operation, 
and  the  Care  and  Use  of  the  Instrument,  with  Explanatory 
Cuts.  Directions  so  expressed  as  to  be  easily  understood. 

Chaptkks  on  High-speed  Shaving,  the  Use  and  Repair  of 
Speakers,  Selections  of  Glasses,  Care  of  Sapphires,  Choice 
of  Horns,  How  to  Make  Records,  and  other  valuable  matter 
never  before  printed. 

Other  Chapters  devoted  to  Batteries,  primary  and  secondary, 
their  Use  and  Abuse,  Dictating  and  Transcribing,  Slot 
Phonographs  and  Parlors,  Spring  Motors,  etc. ,  the  whole 
forming  a  Complete  Practical  Guide,  embodying  the  Knowl¬ 
edge  accpiircd  in  nine  years’  daily  experience. 

This  book  should  be  in  the  hands  of  every  User  and  Admirer  of 
the  Phonograph.  It  will  save  many  times  its  cost  by  im¬ 
proving  the  Efficiency  of  his  Machine.  It  omits  nothing 
Essential,  and  gives,  besides,  much  Special  Information  ; 
and  it  is  the  only  Complete  Work  of  the  kind  ever  attempted. 


PRICE,  $1.50. 


Edison  Phonographs  * 
Pbonograpb  Outfits  *■  ■*■ 
Phonograph  Supplies  % 

llational  Pbonograpb  Co*  jft 

Factory,  Edison  Eaboratory,  Orange,  n.  3. 

Office  and  Salesroom,  St,  3ame»  Building 

Broadway  and  Cwentv»SI«lh  St.  new  Vorlt 


ALWAYS  STATE 


WHAT  KIND  OF  A 


PHONOGRAPH 

YOU  HAVE 

AND  ALSO  ITS  NUMBER 

WHEN  YOU  ARE 
ORDERING  SUPPLIES 


Phonograph 

Accessories 


HAMMERED  BRASS  HORNS 
WITH  SPUN  BELLS 


If  you  clo  not  find  the  information  you 
require  in  this  Catalogue,  write  for  the 
following: — . 

Catalogue  No.  335.  Contains  complete  information 
about  Edison  Phonographs,  Spring  .Motor 
and  Electric  Types,  Standard  and  Concert 
Styles. 

Catalogue  No.  336*  Coin  Slot  Phonographs. 

Catalogue  No.  250.  Complete  list  of  Edison 
Records. 

Catalogue  No.  270.  Price  list  of  Phonographs, 
Repair  and  Supply  Parts.. 


TO  AVOID  ERRORS 


Order  by  Catalogue  number  and  letter  A. 
In  telegraphing,  use  Code  Word. 


JAPANNED  TIN  HORNS.. 

Catalosue  ^o. .  Code  word 


exhibition  purposes, 
mid  In  collapsible. 


it  lins  «  bell  22  inches  In  diameter,  . . 

The  three  sections  nest  Into  a  space  22x22x20  Inches.  * 

SPECIAL  TIN  RECORDING  HORN 

I'ricc  $3.00  Cnt.  No.  A  13103  Code  Word  Sceptre 

HORN  STAND 

Catalogue  No.  A  13201  —  Code  Word  JInlladay 


RECORD  BOXES 


CONCERT.  RECORD  CARRYING 
CASES 


RECORD.  CABINETS 


NEW  STYLE  CABINETS 


I 


The  PHONOGRAPH 


and  how  to  use  it 


plug  will  be  furnished  of  any  base  required  to  fit 
customer's  lamp  socket. 

Edison  Records 

Laboratory  :  will .  J be  supplied^  on'  request/  ^Tlicsc 
cylinders  hrc{  already  prepared  ' ivith'  rccords  ’of 
the*  pidyfeg.  of  famous/ baiids^oreli^tras  fail'd 

are  ready •  to  be  put  on  the  machine  for  immediate 


•  is, made,  by  Mr.  Edison,  and  the  .Edison  Blank 
„  is  j  chemically .  pure. ; ,  It  '.h’as^  W  su^ssful  rival 
ini  , the , j market  There’*, is’tip . polking , ^machine 
company ,  or  ..infringer  who  does  no^rccognizc 

little,  if  any,  cheaper.  The  r  following-,  from  a 
recent  pubjication.  on  the  subject covers  the  , 
ground  truthfully :  "  While  tiic^ingrediimls*  Aittt 


DESCRIPTION  OF 
REPRODUCER 


THE  EDISON  PHONOGRAPH 

£ 

For  Dancing 

[- _ ^  ^  D  you  ever  dance  to  the  Phonograph  ? 

I  \  [no?  Then  you  have  no  Idea  what 
i  I  1  I  porlect  time  It  keepa,  how  emoothly  . 

||  1  y  \  It  ewlnpe  you  over  the  Poor,  fairly 

Wm 

its  clear,  vibrant  tones.  And  oli,  the  fun  of  having  a 

ii 

prettiest  girl  in  the  room  tied  to  the  piano  stool,  or 
prevents  your  hostess  from  sharing  your  pleasure. 

Perhaps  you  have  no  piano.  Perhaps  the  cost 

fees  that  put  it  out  of'the  question.  The  first  install- 

graph  that  ever  pluyed,  with  dozens! of  Records,  and 

strcls,  carry  you  back  to  the  Wagnerian  opera,  play 

No  other  Instrument  will  do  this  with  charm 
and  sweetness,  for  these  qualities  distinguish  j  the  • 

Edison  Phonograph  from  its  imitations.  Sec  that 

and  don’t  forget  that  every  month  there  are  twenty- 
five  New  Records,  to  take  the  place  of  the  ones  you 

The  Ideal  Home 
Entertainer 

THE  Edison  Phonograph  solves  the  enter- 


'riumph  Phonograph 


]  II  '  II  Edison  Gold  Moulded 
!  Records 


Edison  Eclipse 
Coin-Slot  Phonograph 


Direct  Current 


Edison  Bijou  . 
Coin-Slot  Phonograph 
Spring  Motor 


Price  $ 30.00  Code  Bijou 

Catalogue  No.  A  9000 


CIZE: — Height,  i6}4  inches;  Base,  13^x10 
0  inches.  Weight:— Net,  17  lbs.;  Gross,  66  lbs. 
Packed  in  two  cases.  * 

TpQUIPMENT: — Fourteen-inch  japanned  horn; 

Model  B  Reproducer;  coin  slot  for  one  cent; 
winding  crank;  cabinet  of  polished  antique  oak. 
with  cover  having  a  curved  glass  panel,  hinged,  and 
provided  with  a  catch  to  hold  it  open. 
QPTION: — Coin,  slot  for  any  other  coin  than 


Edison  Excelsior 
Coin-Slot  Phonograph 
Spring  Motor 


Price  $ 50.00  Code  Excelsior 

Catalogue  No.  A  3500 


Packed  in  two  cases. 


'p'QUIPMENT: — Fourteen-inch  horn,  Model  D 
■*“'  Reproducer;  coin  slot  for  one  cent;  winding 
crank ;  cabinet  of  antique  oak,  with  a  highly,  polished 
finish ;  cover  having  a  curved  glass  panel,  hinged  so 
that  the  mechanism  may  be  easily  examined.  An 
automatic  catch  holds  the  cover  open. 
QP.TION:— 1 Coin  slot  for  any  other  coin  than 


How  to  Install 

The  Edison  Commercial 
System  Conducted 
With  the  Business 
.  Phonograph 


Publl.hcJ  l,y  the  Manufacturers  i 

National  Phonograph  Co.,  Commercial  Department. 
Main  Office  :  Orange,  N.  J„  0.  S.  A. 


JJOW  IJIO  J 


NSTALL 


FOREWORD: 


Quite  as  much  responsibility  rests  with  the  person  installing  the 
Edison  Commercial  System,  as  with  the  salesman  who  secures  the 
order,  for  it  is  the  Edison  plan  to  both  honestly  represent  the  goods, 
and  have  them  operate  successfully  afterwards. 

The  Need  of  Thoroughness  in  Mechanical  Wort. 

Business  men  if  bothered  with  calls  for  mechanical  assistance  will 
not  appreciate  the  general  success  of  the  Phonograph,  but  pass  an 
unfavorable  judgment  on  the  whole  system  because  of  small  troubles. 
If  the  representative  who  installs  the  system  studies  the  Phonograph 
and  understands  the  correct  operation  of  each  part,  and  then  is 
thorough  in  his  mechanical  work,  there  should  be  no  trouble  or  com¬ 
plaint  from  the  customer.  It  is  the  object  of  this  pamphlet  to  de¬ 
scribe  the  work  of  installing  the  Edison  Commercial  System,  but  much 
will  depend  upon  the  representative’s  interest  and  ability  to  obtain  the 
best  results  from  the  instruction. 


Regarding  Packing  and  Carrier’s  Charges. 

The  packages  should  bo  carefully  opened  with  a  nail  puller,  and 
boxes  and  packing  placed  safely  aside  for  returning  the  outfits  if 
necessary.  Read  page  4  of  the  Catalogue  in  regard  to  the  details 
of  pack'ng.  Pay  the  closest  attention  to  the  manner  of  preventing 
breakage  in  the  original  package,  so  that  the  excuse  of  inexperience 
in  packing  need  not  be  made  when  goods  are  returned. 

Shipments  to  customers  will  generally  be  by  express,  except  to 
distant  points,  and  in  every  ca3e  carrier’s  charges  will  be  prepaid. 

Representatives  are  requested  to  be  both  responsible  for  careful 
repacking  when  goods  are  returned  and  for  having  the  customer  prepay 
return  carrier  charges,  which  is  according  to  understanding. 

Report  breakage  and  damage  promptly  to  the  appointed  Branch 
Office. 


How  to  Identify  the  Parts  of  Outfits. 

It  is  important  to  know  the  articles  in  an  outfit  so  that  they  may 
be  checked  with  invoice  and  installed  in  their  correct  places.  Refer 
to  page  5  of  the  Catalogue,  “  Prom  Brain  to  Type,”  and  note  that  out¬ 
fits  are  divided  into  two  classes,  viz.:  dictating  and  transcribing.  The 
general  difference  lies  in  th9  desk  bracket  and  speaking/tube  for 
dictating,  and  a  pedestal  and  hearing  tube  for  transcribing. 

The  instrument  has  a  slightly  different  arrangement  for  each 
purpose.  Referring  to  page  28  of  the  Catalogue,  Figure  33,  the  speed 
adjustment  screw,  T,  extending  through  the  top  plate  of  the  Phono¬ 
graph,  will  be  noticed  to  be  a  part  of  the  transcriber’s  equipment;  this 
top  adjusting  screw  is  not  furnished  to  the  dictator. 

.  Also,  the  dictating  machine  may  be  identified  by  a  collar  placed  on 
the  back  rod,  which  prevents  the  dictator  from  starting  the  record  too 
far  to  the  left  and  off  the  wax  cylinder.  The  transcribing  machine 


flow  JO~pS 


Ha°“  on^he'left'o/the  record'"^  ^  to  3tarfc  33  far  . 

is  (DOt  ^  tr^,at0rS) 

When  a  single  instrument  is  ordered  for  enmhWw™,  _ 

transcribing,  a  transcril 
connection  is  furnished. 


TheyAare'enSumeratedS  ‘1°  ,COrreo‘ly  in3ta11  the  appliances. 

'  ?oUrtmh6m  l0CallyaC°mp,(!t'a  a0*'6"^'  be  ^suppHe^express  prepaid 


1  No.  62  Goodell  Hand  Drill. 
3  A  Twist  Drills. 

1  5  inch  Side  Cutting  Plyers. 
I  No.  0  Riveting  Hammer. 

1  6  inch  2nd  Cut  Flat  File  and 
Handle. 

1  2-Foot  Rule. 

1  3i  inch  Scratch  Awl. 

1  6  inch  Champion  Screw 

1  5i  inch  Champion  Screw 
Driver  (slim). 


1  3  inch  Clock  Champion 
Screw  Driver. 

1  4  inch  Stanley  Level. 

1  5  inch  Tweezers. 

1  Roll  $  inch  Insulating  Tape. 
1  Yard  Cheese  Cloth. 

1  Piece  of  00  Sandpaper. 

*1  Edison  Outfit  Tool  Kit,  con¬ 
taining  Brush,  Oil,  Oil  Can, 
Wrench  and  Screw  Driver. 
*1  Wrench  to  set  Shaving 
Machine  Knife. 

Representatives  should  have  access  to  saw,  carpenter's  hammer 
nail  puller,  and  small  alcohol  lamp  for  soldering  electrical  connections.’ 

Electric  Wiring. 

the  Itil a”  ;mP°rfcant  detail  in  the  soliciting  of  customers  to  inspect 
delay.1  outlets,  before  promising  to  install  the  system  without 

ativestn  nvemlfi  P!i0nf>^rapti  Co.  expressly  instruct  their  represent¬ 
ed  4  lie  ed  a.ny  ?l0ct™  w™g  beyond  eight  feet  from  the  Phono- 
the  outfits?*  '  e'ght  ^  ree“  “r  attaohment  oords  aro  furnished  with 
,  0‘ty  ordinances  and  Board  of  Fire  Underwriters  in  every 

.  ^ety  strict  in  enforcing  their  rules.  Experienced  wire- 
tiuT^footcomfectkm  to0ouraphonograph.^ eral)*oyed wlre beyond 


IJOW  IJ1_0  JNSTALL 


TO  REPEAT:— WHEN  ELECTRIC  WIRING  IS  NECESSARY  BEYOND  EIGHT 
FEET  FROM  THE  INSTRUMENT,  CUSTOMERS  SHOULD  BE  OBLIGED  TO  EMPLOY 
AND  BEAR  THE  EXPENSE  OF  PROFESSIONAL  WIREMEN.  FAILURE  TO  OBSERVE  , 
THIS  RULE  MAY  RESULT  IN  SEVERE  LOSS  FOR  ALL  CONCERNED. 

Customers  should  not  be  inconvenienced  by  losing  the  light  of 
their  incandescent  lamp  when  making  a  connection  in  a  lamp  socket. 
The  manufacturers  supply  a  “multiple  tap  plug"  with  the  attachment 
cord,  by  which  means  the  lamp  may  be  connected  in  the  same  socket 
with  the  cord. 

Either  of  the  two  ends  of  the  attachment  cord  for  direct  current 
may  be  placed  in  the  resistance  B,  or  in  the  Phonograph  at  A  (Figure  5 
of  the  Catalogue).  When  the  connection  socket  is  below,  simply 
reverse  the  position  of  the  cord  shown  in  the  illustration. 

Too  much  stress  cannot  be  placed  upon  obtaining  full  information 
concerning  the  electrical  conditions  in  a  customer's  office  before  order¬ 
ing  or  attempting  to  install  the  instruments.  An  error  in  connecting 
the  wrong  instrument  to  the  circuit  will  probably  cost  the  loss  of  a  machine. 
Ask,  First,  Is  the  current  alternating  or  direct?  Second,  What  is  the 
voltage  ?  Third,  If  alternating,  what  is  the  frequency?  (Generally 
given  at  60  cycles.) 

Don’t  accept  a  statement  until  you  have  checked  the  information 
by  referring  to  the  engineer  of  the  local  plant  of  the  lighting  company. 
Tell  the  informants  the  importance  of  knowing  exactly. 

Attaching  the  Desk  Bracket  for  Dictators. 

Referring  to  the  Catalogue,  page  18,  Figures  20  and  21,  directions 
are  there  given  for  attaching  the  bracket  to  the  left  or  right  side  of 
the  desk. 

An  important  detail  not  mentioned  in  the  Catalogue  is  to  have  the 
machine  level.  Pieces  of  wood  or  paper  may  be  placed  under  the  cabi¬ 
net  to  accomplish  this,  and  the  top  of  the  machine  leveled  up  with  the 
level  carried  in  the  tool  kit. 

Occasionally  a  particular  person  may  object  to  the  bracket  being 
screwed  to  a  valuable  desk.  In  such  cases  insert  the  screws  on  one 
side  of  the  hinge  brackets  only,  leaving  the  face  of  the  desk  without 


The  Pedestal  for  Transcribers. 

Referring  to  the  Catalogue,  page  19,  Figure  22,  the  pedestal  is 
shown  in  correct  position,  and  instructions  are  given  for  installing  it. 

It  is  important  to  have  the  machine  level  on  the  pedestal,  as  in  the 
case  of  the  bracket.  To  change  the  level,  insert  strips  between  the 
cabinet  and  the  top  of  the  pedestal  casting. 


JjOW  IJ1_0  JNS 


Thus  the  machine  may  be  moved  to  the  dictator’s  desk,  where  a  simi 
lar  arrangement  of  bracket,  board  and  foot  trip  is  provided.  How 
ever,  this  arrangement  is  not  desirable  in  most  cases,  and  should  not  hi 
recommended  unless  the  customer  understands  the  extra  trouble  am 
expense. 


The  Metallic  Flexible  Foot  Trip. 


Referring  to  the  Catalogue,  page  10,  there  is  little  to  add  ii 
installing  this.  trip. 

Like  the  pedestal  the  trip  should  not  be  free  to  move,  but  the 
pedal  casting  should  be  screwed  firmly  in  the  best  position  for  the  user 
The  flexible  tube  is  furnished  four  and  one-half  feet  (4i  feet)  Ionj 


for  the  greatest  requirements.  If  when  the  installation  is  made  the 
tube  could  be  shortened  to  look  neater  and  be  more  mechanical,  thi 
upper  ond  may  be  easily  cut  off  with  a  file. 

Do  not  have  short  or  unnecessary  turns  in  the  tube  to  cause  fric 
tion  and  possible  stretching  of  the  chain  inside.  Form  the  tube  ii 
t  the  desk  solidly  on  the  tube  if  necessary  t< 


fix  it  in  a  permanent  position. 

If  the  chain  in  the  tube  works  hard,  it  is  probably  dirty  or  twisted. 
In  such  a  case  remove  the  chain  and  straighten  it,  and  lubricate  it  with 
Albany  grease' to  have  it  run  easily  and  smooth. 

Note  that  each  Phonograph  is  fitted  with  the  correct  foot  trip 


lever,  B,  Figure  9;  the  lever  will  be  found  tied  to  the  instrument  when 
unpacked.  Do  not  use  a  lever  not  fitted  to  the  machine.  The  fitting 
is  necessary  to  give  the  lever  the  full  motion  through  the  hole  in  each 


Inspecting  the  Cylinders. 

Twelve  cylinders  arc  furnished  with  each  -  outfit,  but  before  use 
they  should  be  inspected  for  a  perfect  surface,  and  preferably  shaved 
on  the  shaving  machine  furnished  with  the  instrument  to  be  sure  they 
are  true. 

Gummed  labels  with  printed  numbers  froni  1  to  100  are  found 
with  the  cylinders,  and  these  should  be  placed  on  the  cylinder  lo\c 
from  1  upwards  before  the  System  is  used. 

The  importance  of  perfect  wax  cylinders  is  further  discussed 
under  the  subject  of  “The  Shaving  Machine." 


The  Care  of  the  Dire 


Curri 


right  center  in  the  swing  gate.  Learn  to  test  the  adjustment  of  the 
mandrel  shaft  by  pressing  on  the  foot-trip  or  the  start  button  to  take 
off  the  friction  P,  Figure  2.  This  friction  acts  to  quickly  stop  the  revo¬ 
lution  of  the  wax  cylinder  after  speaking.  A  slight  pressure  only  is 
necessary  to  throw  off  the  friction  and  not  throw,  in  the  power. 

With  the  friction  removed  the  mandrel  may  be  given  a  spin  to  see 
that  all  centers  are  adjusted  and  oiled.  Inspectors  should  make  this 
test,  and  see  that  a  slight  turn  produces  8  or  10  free  revolutions  with  no 
sign  qf  friction. 


The  Shaving  Machine.  ' 

A  sectional  illustration  of  the  shaving  machine  is  shown  in  the 
pamphlet  “Asked  and  Answered,”  and  described  on  pages  26  and  27 
of  the  Catalogue. 

Oiling  is  an  important  action  to  give  the  best  results  on  this  high 
speed  machine.  The  cups  on  the  electric  motor  (if  driven  electrically) 
and  the  cup  on  the  fan  inside  the  cabinet  should  be  frequently  filled 


JJOW  rj1_0:  JNSTALL 


cause  this  looseness.  After  each  dozen  Bhavings  try  the  mandrel  for 
end-play,  and  set  up  the  right  center  if  the  shaft  appears  loose. 

Good  shaving  makes  clear  records  possible,  while  bad  shaving, 
makes  good  records  almost  impossible.  The  person  operating  this  ma¬ 
chine,  especially  a  boy,  should  receive  the  most  strict  and  impressive 
orders  to  pay  attention  to  securing  the  best  results.  A  WRITER  cannot 

DICTATOR  CANNOT  SUCCESSFULLY  MAKE  ACCURATE  RECORDS  ON  A  ROUGH 
CYLINDER. 

Try  to  make  it  the  rule  in  every  office  to  do  the  shaving  once  a 
day,  and  do  it  carefully.  A  generous  supply  of  cylinders  will  make  this 
possible  and  be  a  good  investment.  After  each  day’s  shaving,  clean  the 
machine  completely,  and  cover  it  up  until  the  next  day.  A  dirty  feed 
screw  or  wax  on  the  straight  edge  at  the  front  of  the  machine  where 
the  arm  rests  will  make  an  uneven  rough  surface  on  the  cylinder.  The 
wax  drawer  on  the  bottom,  if  not  emptied  frequently,  will  stop  the  oper¬ 
ation  of  the  fan,  and  cause  the  chips  to  fly  about  instead  of  falling  down 
the  chip  chute  in  back. 


The  Shaving  Knife. 

To  produce  a  smooth  shaved  cylinder,  the  machine  being  otherwise 
in  order,  the  knife  must  have  a  good  edge  and  be  set  at  the  correct 
cutting  angle.  Figures  3, 4,  and  5  show  the  arm  holding  knife,  the  knife 
setting,  and  the  wrench  for  turning  it.  Unless  the  knife  has  been  very 
carelessly  used  for  deep  cuts  the  edge  is  probably  sharp,  and  then  it  is 
changing  the  angle  of  cutting  that  produces  the  smoothness.  Or 
roughness  may  be  caused  by  allowing  the  center  to  become  loose,  as 
explained  in  the  previous  paragraph.  All  knives  are  set  by  expert- 
mechanics  before  they  leave  the  factory,  and  representatives  should 
be  slow  to  experiment  with  a  change  unless  the  results  are  notice¬ 
ably  bad. 

First  be  able  to  know  a  good  surface  from  a  bad  one  when  you  see 
it.  Don't  shave  in  the  dark;  use  a  lamp  near  the  machine  even  in  day¬ 
light,  so  that  a  glance  at  the  cylinder  while  it  is  on  the  machine  will 
tell  the  eye  it  is  smooth  and  polished.  , 

The  only  sure  test  of  a  smooth  surface  is  to  place  a  cylinder  on  the 
Phonograph,  and  allow  the  reproducer  to  magnify  any  roughness  through 
the  hearing  tubes  in  the  representatives  ears.  The  cylinders  from  the 
factory  are  a  model  for  smoothness.  Carelessly  shaved  cylinders  are 
noisy  and  scratchy. 


Setting  the  Shaving  Knife. 

Referring  to  Figure  3,  noto  the  knife  C  is  held  in  the  bar  B  by  the 
set-screw  A.  Unscrew  A  until  the  sapphire  knife  can  bo  turned 
.  ,.  by.  slipping  the  wrench  at  B  around  the  brans  setting' (Fig.  4).  The 


angle  at  which  the  knife  edge  must  touch  the  wax  is  nearly  flat. 
But  to  know  the  result  of  the  adjustment,  tighten  the  set-screw  A, 
Figure  3,  and  shave  with  the  knife  in  the  new  position.  If  tilted  too 
much  to  the  left  a  thread  will  be  turned  in  the  wax;  too  flat  a  setting 


A  Knife  Clamp  Screw  D  Knife  Bar  Nut. 

B  Hi  urn  Knife  Setting  E  Knife  Bar.  1 

C  Sapphire  Knife.  F  TCnlfo  Bur  Plato. 


will  scrape  the  cylinder  and  show  the  wax  torn  in  places.  Just  right 
will  appear  when  the  surface  is  smooth  and  polished.  Try  the  sound  of 
the  surface  on  a  Phonograph  through  the  reproducer  and  hearing  tubes 
to  know  it  is  perfect.  Instruct  users  to  listen  for  rough  cylinders 
through  the  reproducer  before  dictating,  and  by  every  means  at  hand 
endeavor  to  obtain  perfect  results  in  this  detail.  . 

If  necessary  to  insert  a  new  shaving  knife  proceed  as  follows:  The 
new  knife  will  be  furnished  with  the  sapphire  blade,  N,  securely  fastened 
in  its  brass  setting, '0,  Figure  5.  It  is  necessary  to  remove  the  bar 
E  (Fig.  3)  from  the  shaving  machine  arm  to  insert  the  knife  in  the  end. 
Unscrew  D  and  remove  the  plate  with  its  square  opening  Bhown  atF, 
whicji  insures  the  correct  angle  to  the  knife  where  it  touches  the  wax. 
The  entire  bar  may  now  be  removed.-  Insert  the  knife  with  its  cutting 
edge  N  (Fig.  5),  arranged  as  illustrated,  with  the  clearance  in  back. 


JJOW  IJ1_0  J_N 


Also  in  replacing  the  bar  have  the  screw  A  (Fig.  3)  in  the  front.  The 
fine  adjustment  of  the  knife  in  the  bar  should  be  done  with  the  wrench 
after  the  bar  is  replaced  as  previously  described. 

Practice  light  cuts.  Take  a  heavy  cut  and  notice  white  specks  oil 
the  surface,  due  to  the  wax  tearing  under  the  deep  incision.  Also  hear 
this  surface  on  the  Phonograph;  it  will  sound  very  rough,  and  is  unfit 
for  good  work.  Practice  light  cuts. 


Edison  Commercial  System.  It  is  of  mutual  advantage  to  customer 
and  representative,  preventing  discouragement  and  loss  of  time  in 
using  the  System,  while  the  representative  saves  work  by  attending 
to  small  troubles  before  they  become  large  repairs. 

Let  the  representative  proceed  systematically  to  look  over  the 
machines;  and  lie  can  accomplish  his  work  thoroughly  without  delays  in 
less  than  15  minutes  for  each  instrument.  There  is  no  need  for  gossip 
or  talk  in  these  inspection  calls;  we  have  only  to  think  of  the  great 
systems,  telephone,  telegraph,  etc.,  that  are  inspected,  300  to  500  a 
day,  to  know  what  can  be  accomplished  in  a  small  amount  of  time. 

The  rule  is  not  alone  to  ask  the  user  if  all  is  satisfactory,  but  to 
inspect  the  operation  of  each  part  as  described  below— then  test  the 
result  on  a  record  to  know  it  is  satisfactory  to  this  company. 

Proceed  in  regular  inspection  order  as  follows: 

The  electrical  connections  should  all  be  tried  for  loose  points. 

The  mandrel  and  feed  screw  should  be  tried  for  end-play  and  friction 
by  giving  the  mandrel  a  spin,  as  directed  on  page  9. 

Place  oil  in  the  central  oil  hole  in  the  back  of  the  top  plate. 

Oil  the  centers  of  all  moving  parts  on  top  plate. 

Clean  the  top  plate,  using  an  oily  cloth. 

Oil  the  leather  F,  Fig.  1,  page  6,  which  bears  on  the  friction  plate 
of  the  direct  current  motor. 

Oil  the  centers  on  countershafts  if  Spring  Motor  or  A.  C.  Type. 

Examine  the  foot-trip  and  correct  any  undue  friction. 

Take  out  the  rci>roduccr  and  recorder,  examining  them  for  any  pos¬ 
sible  trouble  mentioned  in  the  description  of  these  tools./ 

Make  a  record  with  the  recorder,  and  listen  to  it  both  on  the 
dictating  and  transcribing  machine  to  know  that  it  is  perfect. 


If  the  recorder  sapphire  point  (J),  the  arm  (B),  or  the  diapl 
(H)  become  loose,  it  will  cause  a  “wheezing”  or  “whistling” 
when  used.  Shellac  or  Stratina  will  fasten  the  loose  parts. 


Edison  Recorder,  Elf).  6. 


Any  bind  of  the  parts  in  up  and  down  motion  of  the  bushing  or  ii 
the  action  of  the  hinge  (M)  will  cause  an  uneven  sound  when  cutting  ai 
if  the  cylinder  were  out  of  true.  This  is  due  entirely  to  “sticking,’ 
and  is  caused  by  dirt  in  the  parts  or  when  the  recorder  is  injured  as  bj 
dropping.  Practise  listening  to  the  cut  of  a  recorder  at  the  time  it  ii 
working  perfectly  on  the  Phonograph.  A  steady  strong  cutting  sount 
will  be  heard.  Teach  dictators  to  listen  for  this  cut.  If  there  is  i 
faulty  sound  they  will  find  the  difficulty  and  not  spoil  a  dictation 
Rule:  Listen  to  the  cut,  then  talk. 

Representatives  in 'trouble  are  advised  to  temporarily  substitute 
the  recorders  from  the  swivel  plate  of  transcribing  machines  with  the 


The  Edison  Reproducer. 

It  is  important  to  cleai 


£!L  5"2- 


7rc/jfC 

l</OF*>Va\ 


EDISON 

PHONOGRAPHS 

RECORDS.  PARTS 

AND  ACCESSORIES 


Dealers’ 

Discounts 

April  1,  1908 


Supersedes  all  Discount 
Sheets  of  previous  date. 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO. 

ORANGE,  N.  J.,  U.  S.  A. 


^r/r4c?v 


Information  Concerning  and  Directions  for  Patting  the 

COMBINATION  ATTACHMENT 
On  the  Edison  Home  Phonograph 


THE  Combination  Attachment  for  the  Edison  Home  Phonographs,  for  Mode 
A  and  B,  consists  of  the  following  new  para:  Main  shaft  (37),  assemble 
with  cylinder  (aS)  and  driving  pulley  (30),  special  differential  gear  elute 
(28),  screw  sleeve  (ay),  retaining  collar  (26),  and  set  screw  (3.),  which  take  th 
place  of  the  old  matn.shaft,  cylinder  and  pulley.  There  is  also  a  special  pivot  (29) 
carrying  a  small  gear  to  take  the  place  of  the  old  back  center,  and  a  small  collar  (32 
.  which  is  to  be  placed  on  the  backrod  between  the  diaphragm  arm  bearings  wliic 
limits  the  distance  the  diaphragm  arm  is  to  travel  to  the  right.  This  collar  is' to  prevail 
the  thread  of  the  feed-nut  from  coming  into  contact  with  the  thrust  collar  which  serve 

drop  of  the  cylinder  shaft.  A  Model  H  Reproducer” for ’pllyinrthe’fou^minute  'o 
Amberol,  Record,  a  screw  driver  for  applying  these  parts  and  a  clutch-shifting  live 
bracket,  with  clutch  lever  assembled  (24)  for  shifting  clutch  casing  from  Two-Minut 
to  the  Four-Minute  position,  and  vice  ■versa.  This  dutch-shifting  lever  bracket  i 
furnished  for  Models  A  and  B  Phonographs  only.  For  Model  C  Phonographs 


GENERAL  REFERENCE  TO  THE 

ATTACHMENT  PARTS 

[.The  fallowing  reference,  to  th,  Attachment  are  intended,  to,  explain  in  a  genera I 
•way  the  method  of  putting  it  on.  The  detailed  instructions,  with  reference  cuts,  are 
given  on  the  following  pages.}  1 

wtli  run  i«o  revolution,  per  minute,  but  the  screw  sleeve,  being  operated  through 
the  small  tram  of  gearing  just  described,  will  revolve  half  the  number,  or  80 
revolution,  per  minute,  feeding  the  diaphragm  arm,  or  reproducer,  at  the  coin  of  200 
the  machine' will  "1/  °F  tbreod!‘  per  inch-  Whcn  ,he  cla,dl  is  ,his  position, 


7'  w  ,J,e  Four"M,nute  Record,  and  the  diaphragm  ai...  a,„,ulu 

p'Prt.U“r'  WJ’iCh  !*  fi"'d  Wi,h  "  n'W  ,tyk  5“'’phir'  «■■>>”«  *“  be 

used  with  the  Four-M.nutc  Record  only.  If  it  is  desired  to  play  the  Standard,  or  Two- 
Minute  Record,  the  Model  C  Reproducer  must  be  used,  and  the  clutch  casing  must  be 
r.hn'd,'rb'  left  ‘n0  r'“ss  in  ,h'  driving  H'qr.  In  pushing  this  clutch,  casing 
ar  „f  ,.  7’m  W‘  beCOm'  dis™E»8«l  «nd  the  two  pin,  fastened  to  the 

cl'umhingethe1'feedI,scr«vVs!eev^toCthel,drivIng^pu”eyrwith  i"  T  PUllf'y'dlh'r'b>’ 


MAKING  AMATEUR  RECORDS  < 
THE  EDISON  PHONOGRA1 


A  t'alnloirMp  nl' 

Edison  Phonographs 

Records,  Reproducers, 
Attachments  and 
Accessories 


National  I’lionojri-aph  C'i 


The  reproduction  of  music  mid 
speech  by  the  Kdisou  J’liono- 
ffrapli  is  easily  the  most  natural, 
the  clearest  and  the  freest  from 
extraneous  sounds. 

It  has  the  longest  placing 
Record  in  the  world— the  Iviison 
Aniheml  Record — playing  from 
four  to  four  and  thrco-ipmrtcr 
minutes,  according  to  the  selec¬ 
tion  rendered. 

it  is  the  only  type  of  sound- 
reproducing  instrument  with 
which  records  may  lie  made  at 
home— a  never-failing  source  of 
amusement  to  the  family  circle. 

Among  its  styles  is  the  new 
Amhcrola  Phonograph.  This 
instrument  has  been  on  the 
market  only  a  lew  months,  hut  it 
has  already  achieved  a  wonderful 
popularity.  It  is  a  beautiful 
musical  instrument — an  adorn¬ 
ment  to  any  room  or  house. 

'I'lie  Kdisou  Phonograph  now 
has  the  exclusive  services  of  Leo 
Slczak,  the  great  tenor,  in  making 
Records.  It  also  has  Records 
by  Margucril  a  Sylva,  Riecardo 


Marlin,  Kloreneio  Constantino, 
lilunchc  A  mil,  Carmen  Melis, 
and  many  other  Grand  Opera 

It  has  the  exclusive  services 
of  Victor  Herbert,  the  famous 
composer  and  musician,  and  Ins 
great  orchestra,  in  making 
Records.  Its  repertoire  of  in¬ 
strumental  music  also  includes 
Records  by  Sousa’s  Rand,  the 
United  States  Marine  Rand  and 
many  other  prominent  organiza¬ 
tions.  Its  catalogues  include  the 
widest  range  of  vocal  music  from 
selections  from  the  great  operas 
by  artists  of  world-renown  to 
popular  songs  by  leading  vaude¬ 
ville  stars.  It  also  has  Records 
in  every  important  foreign  lan¬ 
guage. 

More  Edison  Phonographs 
have  been  sold  than  any  other 
make.  Their  range  of  price  places 
them  within  the  reach  of  all. 


Edison  Triumph  Phonograph 

Combination  Type 

Price,  $60.00 


Edison  Standard  Phonograph 


Special  Standard  Equipments 


vith  Cygnet  Horn 


Edison  Concert  Records 
Price,  75  Cents 
1 ) I S(  )X  ( '<)iiri  rl  l{r«-nrtls!irf  mmlo  by  Mm 

tin:  mimufnrturo  of  Phonographs  of  litis  kind. 
C'oiierrL  ltirnrds  mv  niadn  to  ordn*  only, 
simply  lo  supply  nmcliim  s  of  this  typo  (play- 

Model  D 

Repeating  Attachment 


Edison  Standard  Records 
Price,  35  Cents 


l  I 


Concert  Phonograph 
Attachments 


Edison  Blanks 


Recording  Horn 


Attachments  for 
Playing  Amberol  Records 

With  tO  Special  Amberol  Record. 


Hearing  Tubes 

sisiiEii 


Hearing  Tube  Rails 


Chloride  Accumulator  Storage 
Battery 


“MY  SOUTH  POLAR  EXPEDITION” 


LIEUT.  E.  H. 

SHACKLETON 

ON  AN  EDISON  AMBEROL  RECORD 


“My  South  Polar  Expedition” 

By  Lieut.  Ernest  H.  Shackleton 

EDISON  AMBEROL  RECORD  No.  473 

<1,  Lieutensint  lirnest  H.  Shackleton,  of 
England,  is  scarcely  less  famous  as  an 
arctic  explorer  than  our  own  Peary. 
Lieutenant  Shackleton  did  not  actually 
et  to  the  South  Pole,  but  the  feat  of 
is  party  in  reaching  a  point  only 
ninety-seven  miles  distant  from  it  is 
second  only  to  the  discovery  of  the 
North  Pole.  The  knowledge  of  the 
antarctic  regions  gained  by  Lieutenant 
Shackleton’s  expedition  is  of  the  great¬ 
est  importance  to  science  and  history. 

<[  Lieutenant  Shackleton  has  just  made 
this  Edison  Record  about  his  South 
Pole  trip.  On  it  he  gives  some  of  the 
privations  of  his  party,  and  he  tells  of 
some  of  the  dangers  that  beset  them  on 
all  sides.  It  is  a  notable  Record,  made 
by  a  notable  man. 

C,  At  a  dinner  given  in  New  York 
recently,  ex-Ambassador  Choate,  in  an 
address  to  Lieutenant  Shackleton,  said: 

“America  has  no  lack  of  arctic  explor¬ 
ers  of  its  own,  real  and  pretended.  It 
has  a  profound  admiration  for  all  the 


explorers  of  other  lands,  especially  of 
the  mother  country.  You  have  come 
to  a  people  of  80,000,000,  all  eager  to 
hear  the  story  of  your  great  career. 

“  1 1  is  only  twenty  years  since  you  left 
Dulwich  College  and  entered  the  mer¬ 
chant  marine.  Now  you  are  known 
everywhere  and  honored  everywhere. 
Not  the  least  part  of  your  achievement 
is  that  you  have  aroused  no  envy,  no 
inquiry,  no  criticism.  We  ask  our  own 
explorers  to  submit  to  inquiry  and  in¬ 
vestigation.  We  take  your  own  word 
for  your  thrilling  story. 

“  For  1 27  days  you  took  your  life  in 
your  hands.  You  came  back  starved 
and  exhausted,  but  you  brought  every 
one  of  your  men  with  you,  and  you  had 
been  within  100  miles  of  the  South 
Pole.  The  Stars  and  Stripes  float  over 
the  North  Pole.  It  is  only  fair  that  we 
should  leave  the  field  open  for  the 
hoisting  of  the  Union  Jack  at  the 
South.” 

C;  Lieutenant  Shackleton  was  on  March 
28th  presented  with  the  Cullen  Geo¬ 
graphical  Medal  by  the  American 
Geographical  Society. 

National  Phonograph  Company 
ORANGE,  N.  J. 


Lieut.  Shackleton  will  make  no 
other  Records  about  his  South  Pole 
Expedition. 


National  Phonograph  Co., 

New  York  City. 

to-day  relating  to  my  recent  South  Polar  Kxpedi- 
tion  arc  the  only  phonograph  or  talking  machine 
records  I  have  ever  made  for  public  sale,  and  I 
agree  to  make  records  for  public  sale  hereafter,  on 
the  subject  of  my  Expedition  towards  the  South 
Pole,  only  for  your  company. 

Faithfully  yours, 


JOBBERS’  AND  DEALERS’ 

DISCOUNTS  AND  NET  PRICES 

EDISON  PHONOGRAPHS 

Records,  Accessories  and  Parts 


NATIONAL  PHONOGRAPH  CO, 

ORANGE,  N.  J. 


Index 


Past  and  Present  Models  of  Gem  Phonographs 


^  Embossed  Cabinet  Top.  Crane  Socket  in  Swing 
Arm.  Starling  Button  on  end  of  Body.  In  1902  this  machine 
was  equipped  with  a  Model  B  Reproducer  and  Recorder 
omitted  from  equipment.  Lift  Lever  or  ' 
inch  Black  Japanned  Tin  Horn. 


awing  rtrm.  uornmnation  Gears  for  playing  both 
two  ami  four  minute  Records.  Model  K  Reproducer.  Eight- 
Petal  Polygonal  Horn  finished  In  Maroon. 


Edison  Gem  Phonograph 


Edison  Standard  Phonograph 

Two-Minute  Type 

Straight  Horns 


Specially  Decorated  - 


Mahogany  Cabinet  and  Mahogany  Finished  hi 


machines  are  ordered  with  any  ONE  kind  of  Horn  in  lots  of  five  or  multiples  thereof. 


Edison  Idelia  Phonograph 


Effective  May  15,  1910 


Edison  Amberola  Phonograph  ! 

LIST 

DiscountLERNc« 

JOBBERS 

Oak  Cabinet,  Mission  or  Golden  Oak  Finish 

200.00 

40% 

120.00 

50% 

100.00 

Mahogany  Cabinet,  Dull  or  Plano  Finish  ----- 
Circassian  Walnut  Cabinet  ------- 

250.00 

Edison  Alva  Phonograph 

Combination  Type 

Straight  Horna 


Oak  Cabinet  and  Oak  Finished  H< 


peclally  Decor 


Mahogany  Cabinet  and  Mahogany  Finished  Horn 

“  “  "  “  “  14  Specially  Decora 


Horns,  Horn  Cranes  and  Horn  Connections  esJUV'mw'  .<,.<> 


Recording  Horn  I 

For  making  Records  at  Home — 26x6x1  Inches  |  2-°0  ]  -  150  |  •  •  •'■  |  1-25 

An  allowance  of  25  cents  per  horn  is  made  to  Jobbers  when  horns  of  any  ONE  kind  are  ordered  in 
quantities  of  five  or  multiples  of  five. 


Horns,  Horn  Cranes  and  Horn  Connections  sheet  no.  „ 

CONTINUED  Effective  Hay  .5,  1910 


Shaving  Machines  and  Phonograph  Cabinets 

Universal  Shaving  Machines 

Phonograph  Cabinets 


Balmoral 


Miscellaneous 


‘Music  Master”  Wooden  Cvernet  Horns 


INDEX 

Gem  Phonograph,  Model  B...... . 

Gem  Phonograph,  Model  C . 

Gem  Phonograph,  Model  D . 

Fireside  Phonograph,  Model  A... 
Standard  Phonograph,  Model  B. . 
Standard  Phonograph,  Model  C. . 
Standard  Phonograph,  Model  D.. 

Home  Phonograph,  Model  13 . 

Home  Phonograph,  Model  C . 

Home  Phonograph,  Model  D . 

Triumph  Phonograph,  Model  II.. 
Triumph  Phonograph,  Model  C.. 
Triumph  Phonograph,  Model  I).. 
Ambcrola  Phonograph,  Model  A. 

Edison  Recorder . . 

Edison  Reproducer,  Model  C _ 

Edison  Reproducer,  Model  II.... 
Edison  Reproducer,  Model  K.... 

Gem  Attachment  . 

Standard  Attachment . 

Home,  Triumph,  Concert  and  all  1 
graph  Attachments . 


\ 


Notice  to  the  Trade 

In  ordering  parts,  always  give  type 
and  serial  number  of  machine,  in  addition 
to  the  catalogue  numbers  of  the  parts 
wanted. 

Dealers  are  urged  to  order  parts  from 
their  Jobbers  whenever  possible.  If  this 
cannot  be  done,  and  it  is  desired  to  order 
direct  from  the  factory,  such  orders  must 
be  accompanied  by  remittance  to  cover 
cost.  Postage  must  also  be  added  if  order 
is  to  be  filled  by  mail.  Orders  for  parts 
are  too  small  to  open  ledger  accounts. 

The  parts  shown  in  this  catalogue  are 
not  given  in  their  true  proportion  to  each 
other;  some  are  larger,  others  smaller. 


EDISON  GEM  PHONOGRAPH,  MODEL  “B’ 


EDISON  GEM  PHONOGRAPH,  MODEL  “B” 

^JP^ORDERING  PARTS,  GIVE  SERIAL  NUMBER  OF  MACHINE 


in  Assembled.. . 


“  "  '  Lift  Pin  oml  Head. . 

Speaker  Locating  Pin . 

Feed  Nut  and 'spring  Assembled . . 

::  fcJ’a'ST:.::::::::-. 


Cylinder,  including  Pulley 
Cylinder  Pulley  and  Gear.. . 


Winding  Shaft  and  Pinion . 

Shaft  Spring . 

“  Washer . . 

Spring  Shaft,  ‘ Assembled 
th  Spring,  Hatchet  and  First 

Spring  Shaft,  Assembled 


1073.  Winding  Hatchet  Pawl  Stud . 


..  ...Jing  Hale  net.  rnwi  aim 
. „ .  ..  Spring  Retaining  Washer . . 

113s!  Winding  ltatchct  Pawl,  fo 


1130.  Winding  Hatchet  Pawl  Spring, 


I.  Winding  Hatchet  Pawl  Spring  Stud 

I.  Winding  Gear y  .^.  •  •  . . 

).  First  Shaft  with  Pinion  and  Second 


i.  Second  Gear . . . . 
1.  Second  Shaft. .. 


1228.  Third  Gear . 

1008.  “  “  SctScr 

2009.  Driving  Pulley 


Set  Screw . 

Tightening  Arm  with  Pulley . . 

“  Pulley . 

«  "  Stud . 

"  Spring^..  | . 

Arm  Stud . . 


2028.  Governor,  Assembled  without 


.  Governor  Disc  ami  Sleeve . . 

“  Hall  and  Spring . '-() 

“  Spring  Screw . 0-_> 

«»  "  “  Washer...  .0o 

"  Carrier  Collars  and  Wire  .25 

“  “  Set  Screw . (15 

“  Shaft  and  Pinion .  ,00 

«  <<  Pivot  Hearing.  .  U  •#> 


1117.  Starting  Lever  with  Friction  and 

Starting  Hod  Post . 

1 1  •*«.  Starting  Lever  Friction . . . 

“  Hod  Post.... 

Lever  Stud . . 


EDISON  STANDARD  PHONOGRAPH,  MODEL  “B’ 


SPECIAL  PARTS  OF  MODEL  “C”  PHONOGRAPHS 


GEM  PHONOGRAPH  MODEL  “C” 


EDISON  AMBEROLA  PHONOGRAPH 


EDISON  AMBEROLA  PHONOGRAPH 


EDISON  AMBEROLA  PHONOGRAPH 


.  Spring  Barrel  Cover . . 

.  Barrel  Double  Sleeve  mid!  look?3  * 


'•  “  Gear  and  Ratchet  Pin'/. 

.  Barrel  Gear . 


in2o?*  r'*  "  >  Dowo1  Pin. 7.7.  *. ! .* ! 

I07-O.  First  Shaft  with  Pinion  and 

_  Second  Gear . . 

10730.  First  Shaft . 

S00*#.  C;,cl*r'vi.t!1  Hrst  Pinion*  * ! .* 

-‘03.  First  Shaft  Buslung . 

r.  ”  ,  “  -  “  Set  Screw _ 

10/20.  Second  Shaft  with  Pinion  and 

1  bird  ( icar .  j 


10713.  Second  Shaft.*.*. 


“  Set  Screw.. 

J <32.  Third  Gear  and  Hub . 

o-oo  ‘  o  U  ”  SetScrew . 

-‘03.  Second  Shaft  Bushing . 

in-on*  m  •  * .  7!  Set  Screw 


0712.  Third  Shaft... 


ocn?’  ir°l,rtI*  Gear  n»d  ifub! .  i 
ga.*  Third  Sha ft  Bushfng5.'^,*/ 
Pulley  End . . . 


-  .mru .Shaft  Bisiiing  ScV  Screw,  '°5 

_  Pinion  End .  '  or. 

: 

.093.  Governor,  Assent.- without  Shaft.  2.25 


vurnvr  coimrs  ami  N  iro 

Set  Screw . 

Spring  Collar  Set  Screw 
Balls  and  Springs . 


I  20390. 
82. 
20019. 


*  b 


-Continued  from  Page  24 

Speed  Adjusting  lever .  $( 

Speed  Adjusting  Screw  and  Knob, 

Assembled . . 

Sjjced  Indicator  and  Huh.  Assent.. 


-Asscliihlcii 

peed  Indicator  and  Huh.  Ai 
"  “  Hub  Set  Set- 

a* . " . 

'!  Tightening  Arm  am!  Pnilev 

Asm-imI.Ii-.I .  ' 

iwt  Tightening  Arm  and  Hub.’.’ 
"  “  Pulley 


10722. 
j  ..jj'j;' 


.  \\  haling  Crnnk,  Assembled .  apu 


CABINET  PARTS 

I.  Cabinet  Cover  St  ay  Arm,  Assam . 


Cabinet  Cover  Lock .' 

"  “  “  Strike.... 

..  „  Escutcheon. 

;;  Hinge. “f;::”” 

::  “  Cushions  (Pel 

Drawer  .Stop 


Xmii;::. 

f  rawer  stop . 

Knob  with  Screw. 


t>  ,  „  ,  Knob  with  Serov 

fefe|p'.Co:nplc,c’ 

FseiKclicn,,  .. 


EDISON  AMBEROLA  PHONOGRAPH-Continued 


CABINET  PARTS 


PARTS  OF  PHONOGRAPH  ATTACHMENTS  FOR  PLAYING 
FOUR-MINUTE  RECORDS 


'  Compound  Goars,  Largo  mul  Sii'mli?  A 
,,  ,  ,  Sot  Screw . . . 


F  HOME,  TRIUMPH,  CONCERN 
-L  ELECTRIC  PHONOGRAPH  ’’ 
ATTACHMENTS 
(Not  Illustrated) 


PARTS  OF  STANDARD  ATTACHMENT  ' 
Gear  Guard  tN°‘  ,llu,lr,l,",> 


",  “  ^  ^  Set  Screw . |o,!j  a  , 

"  \\  l’ivot  Hearing . .  .  .  .  .  .  .  4ftt “  • 

Screw  ”  “  op  Center  Set  \  Main  SI 

2Si<oC1S 


Mmn  Shaft  Pulley  Set  Screw .  *  ‘ 

"  “  Pin . “ 

tiChfingo  Gear  with  Stud . “ 

Clutch  Casing  with  Gear,’  Locating  Pii 
rate  dingi’in  and  Spring,’.! ! !  ’ 

Food  Scow, n„IPta.S!,™gSm:';.V: 

”  ”  Thrust  Collar  with  Stop . . 


•A 


PRINTED  MATERIAL—  NON-EDISON  COMPANIES 


American  Scenic  Company 

"Thomas  Crahan's  Artistic  Glimpses  of  the  Wonder  World."  1900. 

S.  R.  Bailey  &  Company 

"The  Bailey  Electric  Victoria  Phaeton."  1910. 

Battery  Supplies  Company 

"Gladstone-Lalande  Batteries."  1903.  [With  attached  circular.] 

A.B.  Dick  Company 

"The  Edison  Mimeograph."  Form  62.  1910. 

Electric  Storage  Battery  Company 

"The  Electric  Storage  Battery  Co.,  Sole  Manufacturer  of  the  'Chloride  Accumulator.'" 
1901. 

Federal  Storage  Battery  Car  Company 

"Beach  Cars  Equipped  With  Edison  Storage  Batteries."  Ca.  1910. 

"Bulletin  No.  3."  Ca.  1910. 

Freid  Engineering  Company 

"The  Freid  Gravity  Dry  Process  Separators  for  Separating  and  Concentrating  Ore 
Values."  N.D.  [With  two  attached  sheets.] 

International  Textbook  Company  (International  Correspondence  Schools) 

"Languages:  I.C.S.  System  with  Phonograph."  1903.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 
"Back  Talk  by  the  I.C.S.  Language  System  with  Repeating  Phonograph."  1904.  [From 
Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 

"Lessons  in  Speaking,  Reading,  and  Writing  the  English  Language  for  Foreigners." 
1904.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 

H.  Wolke,  Inventor  [Herman  Wolke] 

"Newly  Planned  and  Constructed  Compound  and  Variable  Speed  Turbine."  Ca.  1903. 
"Something  New  in  the  Toy  Line:  Automatic  Dancing  Doll  and  Display  Stand."  Ca. 
1904. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
American  Scenic  Company 


"Thomas  Crahan's  Artistic  Glimpses  of  the  Wonder  World."  1 900. 


"  -  ■ 


Primary  Printed  Series 
S.  R.  Bailey  &  Company 


"The  Bailey  Electric  Victoria  Phaeton."  1910. 


= Bailey 
Electric 
Victoria 
Phaeton 


—  Bailey 
Electric 
Vehicles 

1910 


The 

Edison 

Battery 

Cars 


-  S.  R.  Bailey  &  Company,  Inc. 
Amesbury,  Mass.,  U.  S.  A. 


The  Bailey  Electric 


The  Bailey  Electric 


SMBailey  Electric 
Victoria  Phaeton 

The  Bailey  Electric  Victoria  Phaeton 
is  a  characteristic  product  of  this  old 
and  noted  company.  For  more  than 
fifty  years  their  vehicle  products  have 
been  known  for  beauty  of  design,  in¬ 
genious  mechanical  construction  and 
superlative  grade  in  handicraft  and 
materials. 

The  two  generations  of  skill  in  hand¬ 
ling  the  ingredients  of  light  draft  have 
been  applied  to  the  electric  automo¬ 
bile  problem,  and  five  years  to  this 
one  vehicle. 

The  makers  believe  it  to  be  the  per¬ 
fect  type  for  city  and  suburban  use. 


Price,  $2350.00  to  $2600.00 


Victoria  Phaeton 

Page  Two 


General  Description 

This  Victoria  is  the  lightest  electric  automobile 
ever  made  of  its  type  and  size.  The  very  large 
battery  capacity  and  sturdy  high  voltage  motor 
make  the  total  weight  only  2,000  pounds,  but  the 
weight  of  the  vehicle  alone,  i.  e.,  less  motor, 
battery,  and  countershaft,  is  only  825  pounds. 

The  Weight  is  carried  low.  The  frame,  while 
gracefully  curved,  is  in  effect  a  “drop”  frame. 
The  battery  is  hung,  by  3  point  suspension,  un¬ 
der  the  floor  and  is  easily  accessible. 

The  Motor  is  of  special  design  (60  or  48  volts), 
and  of  .high  efficiency.  Light  weight  in  this 
detail  is  sacrificed  to  durability. 

Stowage  The  motor  is  placed  low  in.  the  frame 
and  well  in  the  rear  so  that  the  entire  space 
under  the  seat  is  available  for  stowage.  Consider 
this. 

Steering  A  regular  wheel  steer  is  used,  safe, 
sensible,  and  sure  —  just  like  that  of  the  com¬ 
mon  gasoline  car. 

Lamps  These  lamps,  by  means  of  an  ingenious 
switch  of  our  own,  may  be  increased  and  de¬ 
creased  (turned  up  or  down)  in  brilliancy. 


Victoria  Phaeion 

Page  Three 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Battery  Supplies  Company 


"Gladstone-Lalande  Batteries."  1 903.  [With  attached  circular.] 


IMPORTANT  NOTICE 


SOME  TIME  subsequent  to  November  i,  1903,  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  commenced  to 
paste  a  printed  restriction  upon  the  jars  of  batteries  sold  by  them  to  the  effect  that  purchasers  of 
batteries  bearing  this  notice,  must  thereafter  buy  from  the  Ejiison  Manufacturing  Company  all  renewals 
required  for  such  batteries. 

This  notice  was  not  put  upon  the  batteries  until  subsequent  to  November  I,  1903, 
and  we  desire  it  to  be  distinctly  understood  that  this  restriction  does  not  apply  to  Edison 
Primary  Batteries  sold  prior  to  the  last-mentioned  date,  November  I,  1903,  but  that  the 
owners  of  all  batteries  which  were  sold  prior  to  the  last-mentioned  date,  November  1, 1903, 
or  which  have  been  sold  subsequently  without  this  notice,  have  a  perfect  right  to  buy  their 
renewal  parts  from  the  Battery  Supplies  Company  or  its  authorized  agents. 

We  furthermore  desire  it  to  be  distinctly  understood  that  we  do  not  wish  to  sell  renewal  parts  to  be 
used  in  batteries  bought  from  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Company  with  the  foregoing  restriction  since 
November  I,  1903. 

We.  further  call  attention  to  the  fact  that  such  a  restriction  places  the  purchaser  at 
the  mercy  of  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Company,  enabling  them  for  all  time  to  charge 
excessive  prices  for  renewal  parts  required  for  batteries  purchased  with  this  restriction. 

This  restriction  is  one  that  the  Battery  Supplies  Company  could  also  insist  upon  in  regard  to  the  sale 
of  renewal  parts  for  the  Gladstone-Lalande  Batteries,  but  it  has  refrained  from  so  doing  in  the  interest  of  the 
purchasing  public.  BATTERY  SUPPLIES  COMPANY, 

Dated  December  5,  1 QOJ.  '  J.  W.  Gladstone,  Proprietor. 


Description  of  the  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

HE  NEW  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery  which  we  now  are  placing  on  the  market  is  a 
modification  of  the  original  Lalande  &  Chaperon  Battery  which  was  first  invented  about 
twenty  years  ago. 

It  is  remarkable  that  Lalande  in  his  United  States  patent  of  1883  anticipated  all  the 
present  forms  of  caustic  soda  batteries  (using  copper  oxide  as  a  depolarizer)  which  are  now 
on  the  market.  A  reference  to  this  patent  shows  one  illustration  of  a  perforated  metal 
receptacle  in  which  granulated  or  powdered  copper  oxide  is  held,  whereas  another  illustration  shows  a 
compressed  agglomerated  plate  of  copper  oxide  removably  held  in  a  supporting  frame.  It  therefore  follows 
that  the  Lalande  &  Chaperon  patent  of  1883  broadly  covered  all  caustic  soda  batteries  now  on  the  market, 
and  that  the  only  advantages  that  can  be  claimed  for  any  of  them,  over  the  battery  as  originally  invented  by 
Lalande  &  Chaperon,  are  minor  details  of  construction. 

One  single  exception  to  this  broad  generalization  must,  however,  be  made.  A  patent  was  taken  out 
by  Lalande  on  August  2,  1892,  the  essential  feature  of  which  was  the  use  of  a  plate  of  compressed  solidified 
copper  oxide  having  its  surface  reduced  to  the  metallic  state.  Previous  to  this  time  the  copper  oxide  plates  used 
in  these  batteries  did  not  have  the  surface  reduced  to  metallic  copper,  and  the  result  was  that  it  was  necessary  to 
short  circuit  such  batteries  for  a,  period  of  from  fifteen  to  thirty  minutes  before  a  moderate  current  could  be 
obtained. 

Lalande  appreciated  the  fact  that  this  was  a  most  serious  objection  to  that  form  of 
Lalande  Battery  in  which  the  copper  oxide  was  used  in  the  form  of  compressed  solidified 
plates,  and  after  a  series'of  experiments,  he  succeeded  in  reducing  the  surface  of  the  oxide 
plate  to  the  metallic  state,  which  immensely  increases  the  surface  contact  with  the  underlying 
portion  of  the  compressed  plate  of  copper  oxide.  (See  figure  1.) 


heads  on  each  side  o 


This  important  patent  is  now  owned  by  ns,  together  with  three  new  patents  covering 
onstruction  of  the  new  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery. 

A  brief  description  of  this  cell  may  not  be  out  of  place  at  this  point.  The  distinctive 
feature  of  this  new  battery  is  the  method  of  holding  the  copper  oxide  plate,  which  is 
held  in  position  by  two  perforated  flat  copper  spring  clamps,  covering  about  one- 
third  of  each  face  of  the  plate.  One  of  these  clamps  is  riveted  to  the  two  sides  of 
the  U-shaped  hanger  (see  figure  2)  and  the  other  clamp,  “C,”  is  detachable  so  as 
to  allow  the  oxide  plate  to  be  easily  removed  and  another  similar  oxide  plate  inserted. 
This  detachable  clamp,  “  C,”  is  removed  from  the  copper  hanger  by  tapping  one  or 
both  of  the  curved  extensions  with  a  piece  of  wood  or  metal,  in  the  direction 
from  below,  so  as  to  make  the  clamp  move  slightly  upward,  which  will  allow  the  rive't- 
)f  the  hanger  “H”  to  pass  through  the  eyelet-holes  at  each  end  of  the  clamp  “C”  (figure  3). 


The  exhausted  oxide  plate  will  then  be  automatically  ejected  from  the  hanger  by  the  pressure  of  the  fixed  spring 
clamp  riveted  to  the  other  side  of  the  hanger  which  bears  against  the  flat  surface  of  the  oxide  plate.  A  new 


oxide  plate  can  then  be  placed  in  position  and  the  detachable  clamp  “  C  ”  fitted  to  the  frame  by  reversing  the 
method  of  procedure  outlined  above. 


The  great  advantage  of  this  construction  will  be  seen  at  a  glance,  as  it  is  not  necessary  to  soil  the  fingers 
by  unscrewing  thumb  nuts  covered  with  the  solution,  nor  to  clean  out  narrow  channelled  or  grooved  sides 
constituting  the  contact  parts  of  some  styles  of  batteries  in  use  at  the  present  time.  The  wide  surfaces  of 


contact  presented  by  the  perforated  spring  clamps  of  the  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery  renders  it  unnecessary  for 
any  cleaning  or  sandpapering  to  be  done  when  recharging  these  batteries. 


The  zinc  plates  used  in  the  Gladstone-Lalande  Batteries  are  made  of  an  alloy 
of  the  purest  zinc  and  mercury,  and  are  suspended  in  such  a  position  that  the  zinc  plates 
are  entirely  immersed  in  the  solution.  In  some  models  of  these  batteries  the  two  zinc 


plates  are  cast  on  separate  amalgamated  metallic  stems  (figure  4),  which  are  bolted  to  the  knob  on 
the  cover,  whereas  in  others  the  two  zinc  plates  are  cast  on  the  two  projecting  ends  of  a  U-shaped 
hanger  furnished  with  threaded  stem,  which  is  clamped  to  the  cover.  The  advantage  of  entirely 
immersing  the  zinc  plates  in  the  solution  was  emphasized  by  Lalande  in  his  English  patent  of  1884. 

The  solution  used  is  a  20  per  cent,  solution  of  the  very  highest  grade  of  caustic  soda  that 
can  be  obtained,  and  a  layer  of  pure  mineral  oil  is  used  on  the  top  of  the  solution  to  prevent 
creeping  and  evaporation. 

In  the  construction  of  the  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery  all  the  objectionable  features  possessed 
by  other  caustic  soda  batteries  are  eliminated,  and  the  method  of  recharging  the  battery  has 
been  simplified  so  that  this  can  be  done  in  about  one-tenth  of  the  time  and  without  the  trouble 
which  it  takes  to  recharge  any  other  battery  of  this  general  design  which  is  now  on  the  market. 

The  quality  of  the  raw  materials  used  in  the  manufacture  of  the  batteries  and  renewal  parts  is  of  the 
very  highest  grade,  and  special  attention  is  given  that  everything  manufactured  by  us  shall  be  thoroughly  up 
to  the  standard.  We  are  making  five  styles  of  batteries,  four  of  which  are  suitable  for  stationary  work,  and 
one  style  specially  for  portable  work. 

A  description  of  each  individual  cell  appears  on  the  page  opposite  to  the  price  list  and  illustration  showing 
same,  and  also  some  information  as  to  the  special  uses  to  which  these  cells  should  be  put,  and  the  approximate 
number  of  cells  to  be  used  on  each  class  of  work. 

The  great  advantages  possessed  by  this  battery  over  all  others  are: 

Constancy  of  current; 

Absence  of  local  action  when  the  battery  is  idle; 

Extremely  low  internal  resistance,  thereby  allowing  a  high  voltage  to  be  maintained  at  the  terminals  of 
the  battery; 

Simplicity  in  renewing. 


Description  Gladstone-  Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  G10 

THIS  BATTERY  is  furnished  with  vitrified  porcelain  jar  and  cover.  It  can  be  made  liquid-tight  by  the 
use  of  a  piece  of  adhesive  tape  about  inch  wide,  which  should  be  affixed  to  the  edge  of  the  cover  and 
lap  over  about  2/&  inch  of  the  top  part  of  the  wall  of  the  jar.  The  two  zinc  plates  in  this  cell  are  cast  on 
a  U-shaped  hanger  having  a  threaded  stem,  which  passes  through  a  hole  in  the  cover,  to  which  it  is  rigidly 
fastened  by  a  jamb  nut  and  wing  nut.  The  size  over  all  is  4^  inches  diameter  by  6%  inches  high. 

Special  Uses  for  Model  Gio  Ballcrics 

Gas  and  Gasoline  Stationary  Engines.  Use  6  cells  with  suitable  spark  coil.  '  ■  - 

Gasoline  Engine  Launches.  Use  6  or  7  cells  (taped)  with  suitable  spark  coil. 

Annunciators  for  hotels  and  office  buildings.  Use  6  to  9  cells. 

Long  Distance  Telephones  in  constant  use.  Use  5  to  7  cells. 

Railroad  Crossing  Bell  Signals.  Use  about  10  cells. 


Price  List  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  GIO 


E.  M.  F.  Open  Circuit . 95  volt 

E.  M.  F.  Closed  Circuit . 7  volt 

Capacity  100  ampere  hours 

Knieboog  Gio  Complete  Battery  with  charge  .  .  ’. . $1.50 

Renewal  Charges 

Kniedicht  G11  Complete  Renewal  . . per  set  .72 


Separate  Parts 


Kniefall  G12  One  Oxide  Plate . 24 

Kniefalles  G13  One  double  Zinc  Plate . 28 

Kniegurt  G14  One  can  Caustic  Soda  .  IJ 

Kniegurtes  G15  One  bottle  Paraffine  Oil . 05 


Description  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  G30 

THIS  BATTERY  is  furnished  with  enameled  steel  jar  and  a  porcelain  cover  having  a  groove  round  the 
inner  edge  into  which  a  soft  rubber  ring  fits  so  as  to  make  the  cell  liquid-tight.  There  is  a  brass  stud  in 
the  cover  having  a  pin-hole  opening  in  the  top  to  allow  any  gas  that  may  be  generated  to  escape.  The 
two  zinc  plates  in  this  cell  are  cast  on  a  U-shaped  hanger  having  a  threaded  stem  which  passes  through  a  hole 
in  the  cover,  to  which  it  is  rigidly  fastened  by  a  jamb  nut  and  wing  nut.  The  size  over  all  is  inches 
diameter  by_  8  inches  high. 

Special  Uses  for  Model  G30  Batteries 

Gasoline  Launches.  Use  6  cells  with  suitable  spark  coil. 

Portable  Gasoline  Agricultural  Engines.  Use  6  cells  with  suitable  spark  coil. 

CAUTION — These  batteries  with  enameled  steel  jars  should  not  be  used  on  sea  going  launches,  as 
the  sea  air  and  sea  water  vigorously  attack  any  slight  imperfection  in  the  enamel  and  rapidly  corrode  the  steel 
shell  underneath  the  enamel,  ultimately  eating  a  hole  through  same.  For  sea  going  launches  the  Gladstone- 
Lalande  .Battery  with  porcelain  jar  G36  should  be  used.  The  only  difference  in  this  cell  is  that  a  porcelain  jar 
is  used  instead  of  an  enameled  steel  jar  and  that  no  rubber  ring  is  required,  as  it  can  be  rendered  liquid-tight  by 
the  use  of  a  piece  of  adhesive  tape,  as  described  on  page  6. 


T 


Price  List  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  G30,  WITH  ENAMELED  STEEL  JAR 


E.  M.  F.  Open  Circuit  .  .  .  .  .95  volt 

E.  M.  F.  Closed  Circuit . 7  volt 


Capacity  ijo  ampere  hours 

Knielbank  G30  Complete  Battery  (as  above)  with  charge  .......  $2.50 


Renewal  Charges 

Knielde  G31  Complete  Renewal . per  set  .89 

Separate  Parts 

Knieschlng  G32  One  Oxide  Plate . .31 

Kniespat  G33  .  One  double  Zinc  Plate . .35 

Kniestuhl  G34  One  can  Caustic  Soda . 17 

Knietief  G3J  One  bottle  Paraffine  Oil  . . -  ....  .06 


Knietiefes  G36  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery,  with  porcelain  jar  (with  charge)  .  $2.20 


Description  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  G50 

THIS  BATTERY  is  furnished  with  vitrified  porcelain  jar  and  cover.  The  two  zinc  plates  are  cast  on 
separate  stems,  and  are  bolted  together  with  a  bolt  equipped  with  wing  nuts,  which  passes  through  a 
horizontal  hole  in  the  knob  on  the  cover.  The  size  over  all  is  7%  inches  diameter  by  ioj£  inches  high. 

Special  Uses  for  Model  G40  Batteries 

Gas  and  Gasoline  Stationary  Engines.  Use  4  or  5  cells  with  suitable  spark  coil. 

Annunciators  for  large  hotels  and  office  buildings.  Use  j  to  8  cells. 

Railroad  Crossing  Bell  Signals.  Use  8  to  10  cells. 

Fire  Alarm  and  Police  Telegraph. 

Local  and  Main  Line  Telegraphs. 

Fan  Motors  and  Turn  Tables. 

The  advantage  of  using  the  G50  cell  over  the  Gao  cell  consists  in  the  fact  that  the  capacity  (life)  of 
the  G50  cell  is  double  that  of  the  Gao  cell ;  consequently  the  G50  cell  will  last  twice  as  long  as  the  Gao  cell 
on  the  same  class  of  work  before  requiring  to  be  recharged.  The  internal  resistance  of  the  G50  cell  is  also 
considerably  less  than  that  of  the  Gao  cell ;  therefore  a  smaller  number  of  Gjo  cells  is  required  in  most 
instances  than  where  the  Gao  cell  is  used. 


Price  List  Gladstone-Lalande 

MODEL  G50 


E.  M.  F.  Open  Circuit . gj  volt 

E.  M.  F.  Closed  Circuit  ...  .7  volt 

Capacity  300  ampere  hours 

Knievormig  Gjo  Complete  Battery  with  charge  .  • . $1. 

Renewal  Charges 

Kniewelle  G  j  1  Complete  Renewal . per  set 

Separate  Parts 

Knoflook  Gja  One  Oxide  Plate . 

Kniffes  Gj3  Two  Zinc  Plates  (aj  cents  each) . .  . 

Knokkels  G54  One  can  Caustic  Soda  . 

Knolkool  G5J  One  bottle  Paraffine  Oil 


These  renewal  charges]  can  also  be  used  in  Lalande  Cells,  Types  R  and 


Description  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  GGO 


THIS  BATTERY  is  furnished  with  vitrified  porcelain  jar  and  cover.  The  two  zinc  plates  are  cast  on 
separate  stems,  and  are  bolted  together  with  a  bolt  equipped  with  wing  nuts,  which  passes  through  a 
horizontal  hole  in  the  knob  on  the  cover.  The  size  over  all  is  inches  diameter  by  12^  inches  high. 


Special  Uses  for  Model  G60  Batteries 

These  batteries  are  expressly  designed  for  railroad  semaphore  signal  work  and  are  much  more  efficient 
than  any  battery  that  has  been  placed  on  the  market  up  to  the  present  time. 

It  is  customary  to  use  about  sixteen  cells  of  this  battery  for  operating  electric  motor  semaphore  signals. 
These  batteries  are  also  equally  suitable  for  use  with  electro-gas  signals. 


Price  List  Gladstone-Lalande  Battery 

MODEL  G60 


E.  M.  F.  Open  Circuit . 95  volt 

E.  M.  F.  Closed  Circuit  ...  .7  volt 

Capacity  300  ampere  hours 

Knikstag  G60  Complete  Battery  with  charge . $3-^5 

Renewal  Charges 

Knipbeugel  G61  Complete  Renewal . per  set  1.46 

Separate  Parts 

Knipboon  G62  Two  Oxide  Plates  (31  cents  each) . 62 

Knollhuf  G63  Two  Zinc' Plates  (25  cents  each) . 50 

Knipkunst  G64  One  can  Caustic  Soda  . .  .  .28 

Knipluis  G6j  One  bottle  Paraffine  Oil . 06 


[ATTACHMENT] 


BATTERY  SUPPLIES  COMPANY, 


I  AVENUES, 


Newark,  n. 


December  9th,  1903. 


Dear  Sirs: 


Under  separate  cover  we  are  sending  you  our  catalogue  of  the 
new  Glad  stone -Lalande  Batteries,  which  we  are  now  placing  upon  the  market. 

The  distinguishing  feature  in  these  new  batteries  is  the  method 
employed  for  holding  the  copper  oxide  plate,  which  is  held  by  its  flat 
surfaces  between  two  spring  clamps,  thereby  enabling  it  to  be  changed 
very  readily. 

In  reference  to  the  notice  on  page  2  of  our  catalogue,  we  do 
not  believe  that  the  attention  of  the  trade  has  been  specially  drawn  to 
the  labels  containing  restrictive  notices  which  are  pasted  upon  the  bat¬ 
teries  recently  sold  by  the  Edison  Manufacturing  Company,  nor  do  we 
believe  that  purchasers  of  batteries  bearing  these  restrictive  notices 
purchase,  .same  with  the  knowledge,  that  not  only  do  they  bind  themselves 
during  the  life  of  the  patent,  but  long  after  the  expiration  of  same, 
and  in  fact  as  long  as  such  batteries  are  in  use. 

We  of  course  cannot  hold  ourselves  responsible  for  the  use  by 
you  of  our  renewals,  in  batteries  having  such  restrictions,  as  we  sell 
our  renewals  for  use  in  all  batteries  purchased  without  restrictions. 
Including  our  own  cells . 


co. 


SEC'O  W-c  11 191,3 


Yours  truly, 

BATTERY  SUPPLIES  COMPANY 


Primary  Printed  Series 
A.B.  Dick  Company 


"The  Edison  Mimeograph."  Form  62. 1910. 


INTRODUCTORY 


THE  TYPE  OF  MIMEOGRAPH  DESCRIBED 


“STANDARD” 


Over  300,000  users  furnish  indis¬ 
putable  testimony  of  the  value  of 
Edison’s  Mimeographs. 

For  a  quarter  of  a  century,  in  which 
duplicating  machines  have  come  and 
gone,  the  Edison  Mimeograph  has 
remained  supreme  and  alone  as  the 
most  practical  duplicating  machine 
adapted  to  all  uses  and  purposes,  and 
tells  its  own  story. 

Recognized  as  the  "standard  dupli¬ 
cating  machine"  in  every  civilized 
country  on  the  face  of  the  globe,  there 
can  be  no  doubt  that,  where  a  dupli¬ 
cating  device  is  required,  the  "Edison” 
meets  all  requirements. 

Notwithstanding  this,  no  effort  and 
expense  have  been  spared  to  continu¬ 
ally  improve  this  invaluable  device 
and  make  it  better. 

The  Standard  Mimeograph  is 
designed  for  the  reproduction  of  hand¬ 
writing,  drawings,  maps,  music,  and 


all  work  the  original  of  which  can  be 
made  with  a  pen  or  a  pencil. 

It  is  not  intended  for  reproducing 
typewriting.  (For  information  regarding 
Mimeographs  for  reproducing  typewriting,  ask 
for  catalogs  of  the  No.  61,  No.  62  and  No.  63 

graph,  and  No.  76  Rotary  Mimeograph  — 1910 
model— which  has  an  automatic  self-inking 

The  aim  of  the  manufacturers  of 
the  Standard  Mimeograph  has  been  to 
produce  a  duplicating  device  that  was 
simple  in  its  operation,  practically 
indestructible,  unaffected  by  tempera¬ 
ture  or  climatic  conditions,  portable, 
cleanly  in  operation,  adapted  to  any 
kind  of  paper,  capable  of  a  large 
number  of  copies,  rapid  in  operation, 
and  reproducing  exact  facsimiles  of 
the  original,  plain  and  distinct. 

The  Standard  Mimeograph  meets 
all  of  these  requirements. 

It  will  reproduce  1,000  copies  per 
hour,  which  so  perfectly  imitate  the 
original  that  the  difference  is  scarcely 
perceptible. 

The  machine  is  made  of  mahogany 
with  nickel-plated  trimmings,  hand¬ 
somely  polished  and  artistically 
finished,  and  kept  in  a  hardwood  case 
which  is  of  itself  an  ornamental  piece 
of  cabinet-work. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Electric  Storage  Battery  Company 


"The  Electric  Storage  Battery  Co.,  Sole  Manufacturer  of  the  'Chloride 
Accumulator.'"  1901. 


:  ElECTRIfSTORAGE  BATTERY  CO 


SOLE  MANUFACTURER  OP  THE 


“Cblortbe 
Bccumu  later' 

3 


'  r  ■  aBNERAL  OFFICES  / 

Allegheny  Avenue  and  19th  Street,  Philadelphia 


,-5-% 

1901 


a 


HE  Electric  Storage  Battery  Company  has  ac¬ 
quired  all  the  patents  and  patent  rights  concern¬ 


ing  the  manufacture  of  electric  storage  batteries, 


heretofore  owned  or  controlled  by 


/  The  General  Electric  Company, 

''  The  Edison  Electric  Light  Company, 
The  Thomson-Houston  Electric 
Company, 

The  Brush  Electric  Company, 

The  Accumulator  Company, 

The  Consolidated  Electric  Storage 
Company, 

The  General  Electric  Launch  Company, 
The  Bradbury-Stone  Electric  Storage 
Company, 

The  Hopedale  Electric  Company, 

The  Pumpelly-Sorley  Battery  Company, 
The  Plante  Company, 

•  and 

<  The  Aceumulatoren-Fabrik  Aktien- 
;■  Gesellschaft, 

'^thereby  seedring  to  itself  the  sole  right  to  supply  in 
he  United  States' and  Canada  storage  batteries  of  all 
exvarious  important  types  heretofore  developed. 

‘  Vl  %'!  '  r  • 

i 

W* 


THE  [LEtTRICSTORAGE  BATTERY  CD. 

“dbioiube 


Storage  Batteries 


'TT'HE  acquisition  five  years  ago  by  The  Electric 
Battery  Company  of  all  the  basic  patents  an 
rights  underlying  the  manufacture  of  storage  b 
and  the  securing  since  then  of  patents  and  patent  ri 
new  and  valuable  types,  enable  this  Company  to  furn 
adapted  to  every  requirement  for  standard  or  special  u 
The  alliance  existing  between  The  Electric  Stori 
tery  Company  and  the  largest  manufacturers  of  stor 
teries  in  England,  Germany  and  France,  secures  to  tli 
pany  the  fruitful  experience  of  the  highest  eugineerin 
available  in  this  special  field  of  electrical  manufacture. 


the  highest  efficiency,  the  Ion 
mechanical  methods  of  constructii 
The  Electric  Storage  Battery 
covering  the  applications  of  boost 
•  lations,  and  has  developed  types 
meet  the  requirements  of  the  vari 
storage  batteries  are  operated. 


31 

ELEMENTS  OF  TYPE  "H” 

Size  of  Plates,  15#  inches  by  30&  inches. 


21 

23 

25 

31 

33  35  37 

39 

43  46  47 

49 

6! 

55 

67 

59 

01 

03|  Osl  67 

09 

71 

76 

400 

440 

480 

520 

J60 

600 

640  080  720 

760 

800 

840  880  920 

900 

1000 

1040 

1080 

1200 

1240  1280  1320 

~^o 

- 

JUO 

072 

— 

728 

784 

840 

890  952  1008 

1004 

1120 

1176  1232  1288 

1400 

1612 

1080 

1736  1792  1848 

1004 

1900 

2072 

“ 

880 

960 

1040 

1120 

1200 

1280J 1360  ,440 

1620 

1600 

1080  1760  1840 

1920 

2000i 

2080 

2100 

2240 

2320 

2400 

2480  2660  2640 

2720 

2880 

2060 

1600 

noo 

3040 

3840 

4000 

4640, 

4800 

4960  6120  6280 

64401 

5000 

400 

440 

660 

H 

64o|  68o|  720 

700 

!H 

84oj  88o|  920 

1000 

108°l 

1120 

1200 

1360 

1440 

2«  28  20*  31%  33%  36  36*  38*  40*  42  43 %  43%  47 %  49  60*  62*  54*  66  67*  M%  31%  63  04*  06*  08*  70  71*  73* 

21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21*  21* 

42*  42*  42*  42*  42*  42*  42*  42*  42*  43*  43*  48*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43*  43* 


(See  Page  19.) 


Packing  Charges. 

In  addition  to  the  prices  for  Elements  and  Jars  the  following 
charges  will  be  made  for  cases  and  packing. 

“B”  and  “  B.  T.”  Elements,  2  cents  each. 

"  C”  and  "  C.  T.”  Elements;  4  "  " 

“  P.  T.”  Elements,  10  cents  each. 

"D”  Elements,  10  cents  each. 

•!E"- Elements,  15  .  “  " 

"  F  ”  Elements,  25  "  " 

”  F  ”  Plates  (knocked  down),  3  cents  per  plate; 

“G ’’Plates  ”  “  5  . 

”H”  Plates  '''  ”  g:  "  ,  '• 

Portable  Batteries  up  to  100  pounds  weight,  25  cents  each  ; 
100  pounds  and  over,  50  cents  each.. 

Rubber  Jars,  5  cents  each. 

No  charge  for  packing  Glass  Jars. 

The  minimum  charge  on  any  one  order,  25  cents. 


PRICES. 


Trade  Discounts  furnished  on  application. 

When  ordering  note  the  following : 

(1.)  Prices  of  Elements  do  not  include  Rubber  Jars,  Glass 
Jars,  Tanks,  Electrolyte  or  Connectors,  which  are  additional. 

(2.)  Prices  are  for  delivery  F.  0.  B.  cars  at  works,  Alle¬ 
gheny  Avenue  and  Nineteenth  St.,  Philadelphia,  or  Camden, 
N.  J. 

(3.)  Carboys  will  be  allowed  for  in  full  when  returned  to 
our  works,  in  good  condition,  charges  prepaid. 

We  are  not  liable  for  damage  to  goods  in  transit;  our 
responsibility  ceases  when  we  deliver  the  material  in  good 
order  to  the  Transportation  Company;  all  claims  for  dam¬ 
age  in  transit  should  be  made  against  the  carrier. 

Sundry  Supplies. 

Electrolyte  (Battery  Fluid) . $3.00  per  100  lbs. 

Hydrometers . 1.50  each. 

Sealing  Compound . 50  per  lb. 

Bolt  Connectors,  Type  E  and  F  .  .  .  ...  .24  each. 

”  “  ’’  B,  CandD.  .  .  ;  .15  ” 

Binding  Posts  for  Portable  Cells . 40  per  set  of  two. 


Renewals. 


‘Cbloribe  Hccumulators”  for  Various 
Purposes. 


Chloride  Accumulators  are  made  of  various  capacities, 
and  are  used  for  many  different  classes  of  work,  practically 
including  the  entire  field  of  applied  electricity. 

Following  is  a  list  of  some  of  the  applications  of  the 
Chloride  Accumulator : 

Central  station  lighting 
Central  station  power 
Trolley  regulation 
Isolated  lighting 

Street  car  traction 

Electric  locomotives 
Electric  launches 
Electric  vehicles 

Electric  elevator  regulation 

Yacht  lighting  Train  lighting 

Carriage  lighting 
Fan  motors 

Electric  bells 
Telegraph 

Telephone 

Fire-alarm 

Phonographs 

Kinetoscopes 

Electric  pianos 

Sewing  machine  motors 
Heat  regulation 

Dental,  medical,  surgical  and  laboratory  work 
Railroad  switch  and  signal  apparatus 


The  Electric  Storage  Battery  Co 

GENERAL  OFFICES! 

Allegheny  Avenue  and  19th  Street, 
PHILADELPHIA. 

■  •  SALES  offices: 

t  PHILADELPHIA,  NEW  YORK, 

Allegheny  Ave.  and  19th  St,  100  Broadway. 

f  BOSTON,  CHICAGO, 

I  so  State  Street.  Marquette  Building. 

I  BALTIMORE,  ST.  LOUIS, 

J  Equitable  Building.  Walnwrlght  Building. 

5  SAN  FRANCISCO,  CLEVELAND, 

j  Nevada  Block.  New  England  Building. 


This  List  Supersedes  All  Previous  Issues 

Prices  Subject  to  Change 
Without  Notice 

We  are  not  liable  for  damage  to  goods 
In  transit;  our  responsibility  ceases  when 
we  deliver  the  material  in  good  order  to  the 
Transportation  Company)  all  claims  for  dam¬ 
age  in  transit  should  be  made  against  the 
carrier. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Federal  Storage  Battery  Car  Company 

"Beach  Cars  Equipped  With  Edison  Storage  Batteries."  Ca.  1910. 


"Bulletin  No.  3."  Ca.  1910. 


f  pnrn 

iIhhi 

i  Pi 

I  C)  l™l 

r  mm 

I1 — 1 

mmmkmmmmmmmgmm 


BEACH  TRUCK  USED  IN  SINGLE  TRUCK  CAR 


inj^Vnick  Journal*,  Bnll^Bcnrlng 'Motor ^Journals, 
oscillation  ordinarily,  experienced  fn  single  truck  c 


END  VIEW  OF  BEACH  CAR 

Double  Truck  Type  1 01 


CAR  PERFORMANCE 

BEACH  CAR,  No.  1 

iT  SUCCESSFUL. STORAGE  BATTERY  CAR  PRODUCED- 


BEACH  CAR 

Double  Truck  Type  101 


!  over  drip, 
platforms  s 


the  seats. 


m 


fwiv 


Double  Truck  Type  101 

There  Is  proof  positive  on  record  that  the  Beach  Arched  Roof  is  the  plot 
The  attractiveness,  strength  and  lightness  of  this  roof  is  obvious.  Thl 
trie  arches,  and  is  a  much  stronger  roof  than  possible  in  monitor  form,-,.; 
affords,  by  automatic  ventilators  In  the.'top,  a  uniform  and  adequate 
the  double  sash  and  high  window,  riot  possible  with  tho  old  form  roof.,  Th 
cal,  rustproofed  (In  black)  steel  tubes,*  which  servo  as  grab  rails  Instead  < 
tlcal  tubes  are,  In  turn,  supported  by  tho  longitudinal  lattice 'steel  girder, 


permits 


supports 


INTERIOR  OF  BEACH  CAR 

Double  Truck  Type  101 


INTERIOR  OF  BEACH  CAR 


ONE  OF  THE  TRUCKS  USED  ON  BEACH 
DOUBLE  TRUCK  CAR 

Type  101 


THE  TRUCK 

USED  WITH  DOUBLE  TRUCK  CAR 

Type  101 

In  these  trucks  an  entirely  new  method  ot  design  is  followed.  The  axles  are  of  Chrome  steel  I 
beam  sections,  each  forged  with  3%  In.  ends  Inserted  Into  the  bearings,  which  are  of  the  “Rollway”  type, 
and.  which  are  In  the  hub  of  the  wheel;  these  bearings  eliminate  friction  to- a  large  extent  and  are  inex¬ 
pensive  to  maintain.  The  axles  do  not  rotate,  each  wheel  rotating  independently  of.  the  other,  thereby 
eliminating  all  wheel  slipping,  for  example,  on  a  tangent  track  because  of  the  varying  diameter  of  all  car 
wheels  anil  particularly  at  curves  because  of  the; independent  action  of  each  wheel.  By  this,  lnstead_of  the 
old  method  whereby  the  wheels  are  rigid  with  the  axle  and  the  axle  is  driven,  much  oKthe  friction  loss 
is  eliminated,  less  power.  Is  consumed,  and,  incidentally,  rail  corrugation  Is  overcome. 

Oxyacetylene  welding  is  used  throughout  thls^ truck; 'there' are. ho  boi{8  or  rivets.  - 

As  usual  in  maximum  traction. trucks,  the  Beach  Maxlmum^Tractloh '.Truck  carries  the  load.'princl** 
jpally  on  the  driving  or  large  wheels,  and  each  driving  wheel  Is  driven  independently  by  a  10  H.  P. 


I  ■■  '  ■ 


BULLETIN  No.  3 


ESTIMATED  CONSTRUCTION  AND  OPERATING  COSTS 
BEACH  BATTERY  CAR  SYSTEM  COMPARED  WITH  TROLLEY  SYSTEM. 


Primary  Printed  Series 
Freid  Engineering  Company 


"The  Freid  Gravity  Dry  Process  Separators  for  Separating  and 
Concentrating  Ore  Values."  N.d.  [With  two  attached  sheets.] 


SEPARATORS 


MANEFAGTDRp  BY  j| 
FREIB  ENerKEE®IN.fi_.GJMP-ANY, 
7  0KANGE,  sh,  f\ 


EREID  ENGINBEB 


ORANGE.  N.  J 


Primary  Printed  Series 
International  Textbook  Company 
(International  Correspondence  Schools) 

"Languages:  I.C.S.  System  with  Phonograph."  1903.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat. 
44,494.] 

"Back  Talk  by  the  I.C.S.  Language  System  with  Repeating  Phonograph." 
1904.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 

"Lessons  in  Speaking,  Reading,  and  Writing  the  English  Language  for 
Foreigners."  1904.  [From  Scrapbook,  Cat.  44,494.] 


the 

Student 

Learns 


Synopsis  of  I.  C.  S.  French  Course 


i 


“Back  Talk” 


I?:v3 


THE  ENGLISH  LANGUAGE 

FOR  FOREIGNERS; 

French  Vous  poitvez,  en  peu  ,'de 
temps,  apprendre  chez  vous 
h  parler,  h  dcriie  et  &  lire  1’ Anglais. 

German  3t)v  fount  idjitcll,  an  Saufe, 
„  .  cnnlifd)  fprcdicu,  fefcn  linb 

fdjrctEeit  icrncit.  Scfjt  Scitc  9. , 
Spanish  Ud.  puede  aprender  d  hablar, 
leer  y  escribir  el  ingldis  rapi- 
damente  y  d  domicilio.  Vdase  la  pagina. 
Italian  Voi  potete  imparare  a.  par- 
lare,  leggere  e  scrivere 
Inglese  a  casa.  Vedi  pagina. 

Polish  Mozesz  .si?  pr$dko  nauczyfi 
w  domu  mdwiC,  czytad  1  pisad 
po  angielsku.  Patrz  stronicf.  '  • 

Lithuanian  Greitai  igmoksi  kal- 
bdti;  skaityti  ir  raSyti 
angliskai  namic.  Paziflrek  ant  puslapio.' 
Slovak  Mozete  sa  dorria  rychle  na- 
ucit  pfsaf,  cltaC  a  hovorii: 
anglicky.  Cftajte  stranu. 
Ruthenian  Moskcui  jioua  iiaii'm- 

THCL  i  onopilTII,  'IIITaVlI 
i  imcuTii  no  umvmnicu.  ^mm  crop. 


INTERNATIONAL  TEXTBOOK  COMPANY 


1 


THE  FIELD  FOR  I.  C.  S. 
ENGLISH  COURSES 


38ic  man  (Sitglifd)  lernt 


SBcuu  man  in  bat  fficrcinigtcn 
Stnatcu  UoilurirtS  foittmcn  wilt,  unit) 
wait  cugtifd)  fButtcu.  Sljr  brandjt 
cilicit  Scfjrcr  bcr  nicijt  Did  foftct,  bcr 
Cud]  nad)  bcr  7trBeit  iHiterrid)tcn  Joint, 
*  uiib  bcr  gcbutbig  ift  mib  nic  Biifc  wirb 
menu  3f)r  S-ctjtcr  wadjt. 

Sic  3ntcrii«tionnt  (Sorccfpoubcuj 
®rf)iilcu 

Don  Scranton,  f|5a.,  tjaBctt  cincn  fot» 
d)cn  Scijrcr,  unb  liefern  itjn  Gud)  ins 
fianS  inn  Bci  Gild)  jit  Bfcificu.  Set 
Gbifoit  iprjonograpt)  ift  biefer  Cctjrcr. 
Gt  cntrjiitt  bic  tcibf)aftc  ©tiinnic  beS 
ScljrctS,  bic  man  nad)  ffleticBcn  ait 
pber  ausbrcljctt  famt,  wfitjrcnb  wan  bic 
ilticrfcfjungcu  in  feiner  cigcncii  SOtnttcr* 
fpradic  auS  ben  SctjrBiidjcnt  tieft. 

Set  fpt)onograpr),  bic  ffStotofolic 
unb  bic  2cljr6fid)cr  finb  an  belt  ©ci= 
ten  6,  6  unb  7  aBgcBitbet. 

SBertangt  cine  frcic  2cftion  non 
bent  bcr  Gud)  biefeS  SiHiibfd)rci6cu 
eiidjalibigt.  Surd)  uufer  Stjftcw  mi'ifit 
,  Sfjr  imbcbiiigt  (crncn,  b'enn  3t)r  fount 
bic-  SBortcr  on  bent  ^tjonograpljcn  [o 
oft  loicbcrljotcu  Bis  SBr  fie  gctaiifig 
iiadj[prcd)cit  fount. 


Como  se  Aprende  Ingles 


Es  necesario  que  Ud.  aprenda 
inglds  si  quiere  tener  dxito  en  los 
Estados  Unidos.  Ud.  necesita  un 
maestro  que  cueste  poco  dincro,  que 
le  ensefie  despuds  del  trabajo  cuando 
Ud.  tenga  tiempo  y  que  tenga  pacien-* 
cia  y  no  se  enoje  por  Ips  errores 
que  Ud.  cometa. 

LAS  ESCUELAS  INTERNAC10NALES  DE 
CORRESPONDENCIA- 
de  Scranton,  Pa.,  tienen  ese  maestro 
de  inglds  y  se  lo  enviardn  d  Ud.  para 
que  viva  en  su  casa.  El  maestro  so 
llama  el  fondgrafo  Edison,  y  contiene 
le  voz  viviente  del  profesor,  la  cual 
puede  Ud.  escuchar  <5  hacer  callnr  & 
voluntad,  al  paso  que  lee  la  traduccidn 
en  su  propio  idioma  en  los  textos’. 

El  fondgrafo,  los  registros  y 
textos  se  describen  en  las  pdginas 
6,  6,  y  7. 

Pidale  una  leccidn  de  prueba  al 
que  le  presente  esta  circular.  Ud. 
no  puede  menos  que  aprender  por 
nuestro  sistema,  pues  las  palabras  se 
repiten  en  el  fondgrafo  una  y  otra 
vez  hasta  que  pueda  pronunciarlas 
facilmente. 


Come  apprendere  I’lnglese 


E’necessario  apprendere  l’Inglese 
se  volete  aver  successo  negli  Stati 
Uniti.  Richiedcte  un  maestro  che 
costa  poco,  pub  istruirvi  dopo  il  la- 
voro,  quando  avete  tempo,  cd  uno  che 
sarit  paziente  e  mai  si  adira  ai  vostri 
sbagli. 

IE  SCUOLE 

1NTERNAZI0NAU  Dl  CORRISPONDENZA 
di  Scranton,  Pa.,  hanno  un  tale 
maestro  Inglese,  e  ve  lo  forniscono 
nella  vostra  casa  a  vivere  con ,  voi. 
II  fonografo  Edison  b  il  maestro. 
Esso  contiene  la  voce  vivente  del 
Professore,  che  potete  portare  su  e 
giii  a  vostro  piacere  mentre  leggete 
le  traduzioni  nel  vostro  proprio  lin- 
guaggio  nel  libro  di  testo. 

Il  fonografo,  ricordi  e  libri  di  testo 
sqno  mos-trati  sulle  pagine.  6,  6,  e  7. 

Cercatc  di  nitre  una  Icziouc  di 
firuova gratuila  da  chi  presenta  questa 
circolare.  Non  potete  fallire  di  ap¬ 
prendere  da  questo  sistema,  perchb 
le  parole  possono  essere  ripetute  sul 
fonografo  fino  a  che  le  parlate  scor- 
revolmente. 


\ 


Jak  uczyc  sie  po  angiclsku 


Koniccznie  musisz  si?  uczyc  po 
angielskti,  jezcli  chcesz  zrobic  po- 
stfp  w  Stanach  Zjeduoczonych.  Po- 
trzebujcsz  nauczyciela,  ktdryby  nie 
by}  drogi,  nujgt  ci?  uczyd  po  robocie 
kiedy  masz  czas,  ktdryby  by}  cier- 
pliwy  i  nigdy  si?  nie  pogniewat  gdy 
zrobisz  omylkp. 

THE  INTERNATIONAL 
CORRESPONDENCE  SCHOOLS 
w  Scranton,  Pa'.,  majg  takiego  an- 
gielskiego  nauczyciela  i  niogg  po¬ 
sted  ci  go  do  domu,  aby  wraz  z  tobg 
mieszkal.  Fonograf  Edysona  jest 
tym  nauczycielem.  On  ma  w  sobie 
zywy  glos.  profesora,  ktdrego  mo- 
iesz  siuchad  kiedy  ci  si?  podoba, 
czytajgc  rdwnoczednie  z  ksiqzki-  we 
swoim  wlasnym  jpzyku  tldmaczenie 
tego,  co  on  tndwi. 

Fonograf,  rekordy  i  ksigzki  sg 
przedstawione  na  stronicach  6,  6  i  7. 

PoproS  aby  ci  da}  posiucbad  jedng 
bezplatng  lekcyp,  ten  ktdryci  wrpczy 
ten  cyrkularz.  W  taki  sposdb-.jak 
my,  uczymy, '.musisz  sip  nauczyd’an- 
gielskiego  jpzyka,  bo  slo.wa  mozesz 
powtarzad  na  fonografie  tak  dingo, 
dopdki  sip  nie'  nauczysz  wymawiac 
je  plynnie. 


INTERNATIONAL 
CORRESPONDENCE  SCHOOLS 


Primary  Printed  Series 
H.  Wolke,  Inventor  [Herman  Wolke] 

"Newly  Planned  and  Constructed  Compound  and  Variable  Speed  Turbine." 
Ca.  1903. 

"Something  New  in  the  Toy  Line:  Automatic  Dancing  Doll  and  Display 
Stand."  Ca.  1904. 


Some  Timely  Statements 

And  COMMERCIALLY 

CONSIDERED  FACTS 


i  Compound  nnd  Variable  Speod 

j  TURBINE 


BY 

H.  WOLKE,  Inventor 


PUBLICATION  AND  MICROFILM 
COPYING  RESTRICTIONS 


Reel  duplication  of  the  whole  or  of 
any  part  of  this  film  is  prohibited. 
In  lieu  of  transcripts,  however, 
enlarged  photocopies  of  selected 
items  contained  on  these  reels 
may  be  made  in  order  to  facilitate 
research. 


A  Note  on  the  Sources 

The  pages  which  have  been 
filmed  are  the  best  copies 
available.  Every  technical 
effort  possible  has  been 
made  to  ensure  legibility. 


219 


FINANCIAL  CONTRIBUTORS 


PRIVATE  FOUNDATIONS 
The  Alfred  P.  Sloan  Foundation 
Charles  Edison  Fund 
The  Hyde  and  Watson  Foundation 
National  Trust  for  the  Humanities 
Geraldine  R.  Dodge  Foundation 


PUBLIC  FOUNDATIONS 
National  Science  Foundation 
National  Endowment  for  the 
Humanities 

National  Historical  Publications  and 
Records  Commission 


PRIVATE  CORPORATIONS  AND  INDIVIDUALS 


Alabama  Power  Company 

Anonymous 

AT&T 

Atlantic  Electric 

Association  of  Edison  Illuminating 
Companies 

Battelle  Memorial  Institute 
The  Boston  Edison  Foundation 
Cabot  Corporation  Foundation,  Inc. 
Carolina  Power  &  Light  Company 
Consolidated  Edison  Company  of  New 
York,  Inc. 

Consumers  Power  Company 
Cooper  Industries 
Corning  Incorporated 
Duke  Power  Company 
Entergy  Corporation  (Middle  South 
Electric  System) 

Exxon  Corporation 

Florida  Power  &  Light  Company 

General  Electric  Foundation 

Gould  Inc.  Foundation 

Gulf  States  Utilities  Company 

David  and  Nina  Heitz 

Hess  Foundation,  Inc. 

Idaho  Power  Company 


IMO  Industries 

International  Brotherhood  of  Electrical 
Workers 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stanley  H.  Katz 
Matsushita  Electric  Industrial  Co.,  Ltd. 
Midwest  Resources,  Inc. 

Minnesota  Power 
New  Jersey  Bell 
New  York  State  Electric  &  Gas 
Corporation 

North  American  Philips  Corporation 
Philadelphia  Electric  Company 
Philips  Lighting  B.V. 

Public  Service  Electric  and  Gas  Company 

RCA  Corporation 

Robert  Bosch  GmbH 

Rochester  Gas  and  Electric  Corporation 

San  Diego  Gas  and  Electric 

Savannah  Electric  and  Power  Company 

Schering-Plough  Foundation 

Texas  Utilities  Company 

Thonms  &  Betts  Corporation 

Thomson  Grand  Public 

Transamerica  Delaval  Inc. 

Westinghouse  Foundation 
Wisconsin  Public  Service  Corporation 


BOARD  OF  SPONSORS 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New 
Jersey 

Francis  L.  Lawrence 
Joseph  J.  Seneca 
Richard  F.  Foley 
David  M.  Oshinsky 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Howard  L.  Green 


National  Park  Service 
John  Maounis 
Maryanne  Gerbauckas 
Roger  Durham 
George  Tselos 
Smithsonian  Institution 
Bernard  Finn 
Arthur  P.  Molella 


EDITORIAL  ADVISORY  BOARD 

James  Brittain,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technology 
R.  Frank  Colson,  University  of  Southampton 
Louis  Galambos,  Johns  Hopkins  University 
Susan  Hockey,  University  of  Alberta 
Thomas  Parke  Hughes,  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Peter  Robinson,  Oxford  University 

Philip  Scranton,  Georgia  Institute  of  Technoiogy/Hagjey  Museum  and  Library 
Merritt  Roe  Smith,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  PAPERS 


Robert  A.  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 

Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Associate  Director  and  Coeditor 

Paul  B.  Israel 

Managing  Editor,  Book  Edition 
Helen  Endick 

Assistant  Director  for  Administration 


Associate  Editors 
Theresa  M.  Collins 
Lisa  Giteiman 
Keith  A.  Nier 

Research  Associates 

Gregoiy  Jankunis 
Lorie  Stock 


Assistant  Editors 
Louis  Carlat 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 


Secretary 
Grace  Kurkowski 


Amy  Cohen 
Bethany  Jankunis 
Laura  Konrad 
Vishal  Nayak 


Student  Assistants 


Jessica  Rosenberg 
Stacey  Saeig 
Wojtek  Szymkowiak 
Matthew  Wosniak 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers 
at 

Rutgers,  The  State  University 
endorsed  by 

National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission 
18  June  1981 

Copyright  ©  1999  by  Rutgers,  The  State  University 

All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  including  any  portion  of  the  guide  and  index  or  of 
the  microfilm  may  be  reproduced,  stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted  in  any  form  by  any 
means — graphic,  electronic,  mechanical,  or  chemical,  includingphotocopying,  recordingor  taping, 
or  information  storage  and  retrieval  systems— without  written  permission  of  Rutgers,  The  State 
University,  New  Brunswick,  New  Jersey. 

The  original  documents  hi  this  edition  are  from  the  archives  at  the  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
at  West  Orange,  New  Jersey. 


ISBN  0-89093-703-6 


CX  6dU>oru  (\hp£M> 


A  SELECTIVE  MICROFILM  EDITION 

PART  IV 
(1899-1910) 


Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Lisa  Gitelman 
Gregory  Jankunis 
David  W.  Hutchings 
Leslie  Fields 


Editors 


Theresa  M.  Collins 
Gregory  Field 
Aldo  E.  Salerno 
Karen  A.  Detig 
Lorie  Stock 


Robert  Rosenberg 
Director  and  Editor 


Sponsors 

Rutgers,  The  State  University  Of  New  Jersey 
National  Park  Service,  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Smithsonian  Institution 


University  Publications  of  America 
Bethesda,  MD 
1999 


Edison  signature  used  with  permission  of  McGraw-Edison  Company